Coffs Harbour City Council

16 June 2021

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

The above meeting will be held in the Council Administration Building

Cnr Coff and Castle Streets, Coffs Harbour on:

 

Thursday, 24 June 2021

 

The meeting commences at 5.00pm and your attendance is requested.

 

 

AGENDA

 

1.         Opening of Ordinary Meeting

2.         Acknowledgment of Country

3.         Public Forum

4.         Disclosure of Interest

5.         Apologies

6.         Leaves of Absence

7.         Mayoral Minute

8.         Confirmation of Minutes

9.         Rescission Motion

10.      Notices of Motion – General

11.      General Manager’s Reports

12.      Notices of Motion – Business Services

13.      Directorate Reports – Business Services

14.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Communities

15.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Communities

16.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Infrastructure

17.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Infrastructure

18.      Questions On Notice

19.      Matters of an Urgent Nature

20.      Consideration of Confidential Items (if any)

21.      Close of Ordinary Meeting

 

 

Chris Chapman

Acting General Manager

 

 


Order of Business

 

 

General Manager's Reports

GM21/08         2017-2022 Delivery Program (Year 5), 2021/22 Operational Plan, 2021/22 Delivery Program Budgets and 2021/22 Fees and Charges................ 3

GM21/09         Making of Rates and Charges 2021/22...................................................... 330

Directorate Reports - Business Services

BS21/31          2021-2022 Environmental Levy Grants Program................................. 342

BS21/32          Bank and Investment Balances for May 2021....................................... 352

BS21/33          Sale of Land - Writing off of Rates......................................................... 373

Directorate Reports - Sustainable Communities

SC21/31          Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program - Post Exhibition............................................................................................................. 376

SC21/32          Planning Proposal for an Additional Permitted Use (Storage and Hire of Shipping Containers) - Lot 13 DP 1109077, Hulberts Road Toormina - Version 1 Pre-Exhibition......................................................... 508

SC21/33          Development Application No. 0712/20 - Service Station And Takeaway Food And Drink Premises, Including Demolition of Existing Structures - Lot 1 DP 521554, 19-25 Clarence Street, Woolgoolga 563

SC21/34          Draft Jetty Memorial Theatre Strategic Plan - Pre-Exhibition.. 622

SC21/35          Remote Rescue Tubes Project - Trial - Review Report................... 650

Directorate Reports - Sustainable Infrastructure

SI21/10           Duke Street, Coffs Harbour Traffic Changes................................... 676

SI21/12           Draft Brelsford Park Masterplan.......................................................... 683


GM21/08      2017-2022 Delivery Program (Year 5), 2021/22 Operational Plan, 2021/22 Delivery Program Budgets and 2021/22 Fees and Charges

Author:                        Senior Corporate Planner

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      D.2 We have effective use of public resources.

Attachments:              ATT1  GM21/08  2017-22 Delivery Program (Year Five)

ATT2  GM21/08  2021-22 Operational Plan

ATT3  GM21/08  2021-22 Delivery Program Budgets

ATT4  GM21/08  2021-22 Fees and Charges

ATT5  GM21/08  Summary of Variations Made to Draft Documents

ATT6  GM21/08  CONFIDENTIAL Submissions

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(e) of the Local Government Act as it contains information that would, if disclosed, prejudice the maintenance of law.  

 

Executive Summary

Council endorsed the Draft 2017-2022 Delivery Program (Year 5), Draft 2021/22 Operational Plan, Draft Delivery Program Budget 2021/22 and Draft 2021/22 Fees and Charges on 13 May 2021 and the documents were placed on public exhibition for 28 days.  A total of three community submissions were received and considered in Council’s review of the draft documents.

 

The revised Delivery Program, Operational Plan, Budgets and Fees and Charges are now presented for consideration.  If adopted, these documents will be implemented from 1 July 2021.  There has been a number of changes made as a result of new information received during the exhibition period due to further refinements and resolutions from Council meetings.  These variations have been detailed in Attachment 5. In summary, the impacts are:

 

-      Deterioration in Consolidated Operating Deficit by $372,356

-      Increase to Capital Expenditure by $16,706,389

-      Increase to Capital Expenditure funding from Grants and Contributions by $9,988,597

-      Increase to Capital Expenditure funding from Reserves by $5,261,109

-      Increase to Capital Expenditure funded from Cash by $1,456,683

 

These documents are now presented to Council for adoption.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Adopts the 2017-2022 Delivery Program (Year 5) (Attachment 1), 2021/22 Operational Plan (Attachment 2), 2021/22 Delivery Program Budgets (Attachment 3); and 2021/22 Fees and Charges (Attachment 4).

2.       Inform persons who made submissions of Council’s decision.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Under the Integrated Planning and Reporting (IPR) provisions of the Local Government Act, Council is required to prepare a four-year Delivery Program outlining the activities it will pursue to help achieve the objectives of the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.  A subsidiary of the Delivery Program is the Operational Plan, which details the actions to be undertaken in a single financial year.  They are supported by financial estimates, annual budgets and a one-year schedule of Council Fees and Charges.  The IPR documents are informed by Council’s long-term Resourcing Strategy.  Due to COVID-19, changes were made to Integrated Planning and Reporting requirements for 2020/21 by the NSW Government and the 2020 Local Government Elections were postponed to September 2021.  Subsequently, Council’s existing Delivery Program is now a five-year program through until 30 June 2022.

 

On 13 May 2021, Council resolved to place the Draft 2017-2022 Delivery Program (Year 5), Draft 2021/22 Operational Plan, Draft Delivery Program Budget 2021/22 and Draft 2021/22 Fees and Charges on public exhibition for 28 days.  The draft documents were placed on public exhibition from 14 May to 11 June 2021 and three submissions were received.

 

After considering community submissions, Council is required to adopt the final suite of IPR documents by 30 June each year, for implementation from 1 July 2021.

Issues:

·     COVID-19 Impacts

COVID-19 impacts are in addition to economic and social impacts felt from bushfires, floods and drought during the 2019/20 year and the 2020/21 year.  Council’s revenue streams have been impacted by the decisions made to support the community in response to COVID-19.  During the previous year, COVID-19 impacted a number of actions in the 2020/21 Operational Plan.  The documents being presented to Council, represent the organisation’s best efforts in defining what activities and programs Council is able to progress, and the Council response to the evolving situation within the resources available.

·     Significant Expenditure 2021/22

Council continues to focus on asset renewal whilst also striving to position itself to take advantage of the construction of new infrastructure where funding opportunities become available.  The 2021/22 Operational Plan, proposes budget allocations for works across a range of asset categories and regionally significant infrastructure projects.

·     Budget Impact on Ratepayers

-     Impact on Residential Ratepayers

In September 2020, IPART set a 2.0% rate peg increase in ‘General Income’ for 2021/22.  Accordingly, the ‘average’ residential property can expect a total rates and charges increase (including annual access charges and water usage charges) of approximately $79.82 per annum (or $1.54 per week) which is a 2.1% increase from 2020/21.

 

The following table shows the impact on the total rates and charges payable in 2021/22 for the ‘average’ residential property.

 

The ‘average’ residential property has been based on a land valuation of $244,600 and this valuation has been used in the determination of both the residential ordinary rates and the environmental levy.

 

Rates and Access Charges

2020/21 ($)

2021/22 ($)

Increase ($)

Increase (%)

Residential Ordinary Rate

1,238.94 

1,261.38 

22.44 

1.8 

Environmental Levy

45.28 

46.17 

0.89 

2.0 

Sewerage Access Charge

922.00 

958.00 

36.00 

3.9 

Water Access Charge

149.00 

152.00 

3.00 

2.0 

Water Usage (250 KL pa)

795.00 

812.50 

17.50 

2.2 

Domestic Waste Service

695.00 

695.00 

7.00 

0.0 

Stormwater Management

25.00 

25.00 

0.00 

0.0 

Total Rates and Access Charges

3,870.23 

3,950.05 

79.82 

2.1 

Increase per Week

  

  

1.54 

 

 

The following comments should be considered in conjunction with the above information:

1.     The Rate Peg % does not apply to Sewer, Water, Waste or Stormwater charges.

2.     Water charges include 250 KL of water usage for a year.

 

·     Financial Estimates

Variations on the previous financial estimates are contained within Attachment 5. In summary, the impacts are:

 

-    Deterioration in Consolidated Operating Deficit by $372,356

-    Increase to Capital Expenditure by $16,706,389

-    Increase to Capital Expenditure funding from Grants and Contributions by $9,988,597

-    Increase to Capital Expenditure funding from Reserves by $5,261,109

-    Increase to Capital Expenditure funded from Cash by $1,456,683

 

The 2021/22 budget result forecasts an estimated underlying deficit before capital revenue, of $3,174,000.  This is comprised of estimated results of $8.510 million deficit for the General Fund, $3.227 million surplus for the Water Fund and $2.109 million surplus for the Sewer Fund.  A review of the financial estimates for each fund is as follows:

 

-     General Fund

The draft financial estimates for Council’s General Fund project the following accrual results:

 

Year

Financial Estimate after Capital Revenue ($)

 

Financial Estimate before Capital Revenue ($)

 

2021/22

48,484,000

Surplus

(8,510,000)

Deficit

 

Operational incomes and expenditures are tightly budgeted and have been subject to constant scrutiny in recent years.

 

There are significant capital works planned which are funded from rate variations, trading operations, grants, loans, S7.11 contributions, reserves, etc.

 

Council's revenues are gradually increasing and savings are being realised to meet appropriate expenditure levels in relation to operations, particularly infrastructure maintenance, asset renewals and capital works.

 

At its meeting of 22 April 2021, Council resolved to consider the following capital items within the 2021/22 Delivery Program which have been included in the current Budget result:

 

Council Agenda Item

Description

Funds sought 2021/22

Funds sought 2022/23

SC21/14

New Permanent Museum Exhibition

         $734,606

           $1,151,719

 

The capital funding for the museum exhibition has been included in the budget.

 

Further, at its meeting of 22 April 2021, Council resolved as follows:

 

“3.   Prior to allocating funds for the exhibitions, provide an updated end cost budget for the CCS project including all required expenses to have the project fully operational.”

 

The end cost budget for the construction of the Cultural and Civic Space project is as previously reported to Council and as presented within the resource centre as $81.265 million.  Costs over and above this amount to have the project full operational can be detailed as follows:

 

Item required to have project fully operational

Current Costs

Future Costs

Additional Costs

Included in forward Budgets

Building Operating Costs

$831k

$831k *

nil

Yes

Annual Staff Costs for Rigby House, Administration Building and Museum

$30.6m

$31.4m

$800k **

Yes

Library Museum Gallery Additional Annual Operating Costs

Nil

$200k

$200k

Yes

Library Museum Gallery Additional One Off Capital Costs

Nil

$415k

$415k

Yes in 2021/22

Library Museum Gallery Additional Collection Capital Costs

$172k

$244k

$72k

Yes

 

*   It is estimated the operating cost of the new facility will be less than the current operating cost of the current three facilities being replaced.  The same figure has been used in the forward budgets as a conservative budget measure.

**  These additional costs are solely related to an increase in level of service in the Library Museum and Gallery and the associated staff cost.

 

Additional Annual costs included in the forward budgets for the project total $1.07 million.  Additional one off capital costs included in the 2021/22 budget for the Library Museum and Gallery is $415k excluding the inclusion of the exhibition funding of $734,606 allocated in 2021/22 and $1,151,719 allocated in 2022/23.

 

-     Water and Sewerage Funds

Both the Water and Sewer Funds have undertaken substantial programs of capital works in recent years.  These works have been essential to maintain the integrity of the infrastructure and liveability of our city.  These programs have been funded by a combination of loan funds, developer contributions, reserve funds and grants.

 

Water and Sewer charges have been held to reasonable increases in recent years, despite the significant loan repayments that require to be serviced.  The Delivery Program provides for operating surpluses in the Sewer and Water Funds. Details are set out below:

 

§ Water Fund

Year

Financial Estimate
($)

 

Financial Estimate before Capital Revenue ($)

 

2021/22

5,922,000

Surplus

3,227,000

Surplus

§ Sewer Fund

Year

Financial Estimate
($)

 

Financial Estimate before Capital Revenue ($)

 

2020/21

4,694,000

Surplus

2,109,000

Surplus

 

-     Pensioner Rebates

Council will write off about $3.39 million in pensioner rates and charges in 2021/22.  Of this, Council voluntarily forgoes approximately $650,000.  Council is required to forgo the remaining $2.74 million under State Government legislation.

 

The amount Council is reimbursed by the State is approximately $1.507 million, leaving an overall cost to Council of approximately $1.233 million.

 

-     Environmental Levy for 2021/22

The Environmental Levy (being a Special Rate) is calculated with a ‘base amount’ to raise approximately 47% of the levy with the balance raised as an ad valorem rate applied to land values.  The purpose of the Environmental Levy is to fund environmental works, and it is levied on all rateable land.

 

-     Proposed Loan Borrowings for 2021/22

On 25 February 2021, Council resolved to allocate an additional $4,245,000 in loan borrowings for the Cultural and Civic Space Project.  This Council resolution brings the total external loan borrowings for the Cultural and Civic Space project to $50,265,000 in 2021/22.

 

Council resolved on 11 February 2021 to allocate an additional $4,165,000 via external loan funding for the construction of the Wiigulga Sports Complex, an integrated sport and community facility, located on the northern western end of the township of Woolgoolga.  The project is jointly funded by all three levels of Government.

 

It is also proposed that Council borrow $2,840,400 via an external loan to assist in funding the Centenary Drive, Woolgoolga intersection upgrade.

 

2021/22 Fees and Charges

Council’s fees and charges have increased by an average of approximately 2.00%, reflecting increases in staff delivery and administrative costs.  The 2021/22 Fees and Charges document is available as Attachment 4.

Options:

This report aims to facilitate the structured roll-out of Council programs of the 2021/22 Operational Plan and enable compliance with legislative requirements. At this time, the following options are available to Council:

 

1.    Adopt the recommendation provided to Council; this will enable the documents to be finalised within the legislated timeframe.

2.    Amend the recommendation provided to Council; depending on the nature of the amendment this may impact on the structure and content of the documents and Council’s ability to finalise the budget planning process according to the set timeframe.

3.    Reject the recommendation provided to Council; this will impact on Council’s ability to finalise the budget planning process according to schedule.  Failure to adopt the final Delivery Program, Operational Plan, Budget, and Fees and Charges documents by 30 June 2021 would represent a breach of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Option 1 is recommended.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental impacts associated with the preparation of this report, however, the documents provide a foundation to support the maintenance and enhancement of Council programs to protect the Coffs Harbour LGA environment.

•     Social

Consistent with the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan, the documents include a range of strategies to enhance the social development of the Coffs Harbour LGA.

•     Civic Leadership

The documents are key components of the Integrated Planning and Reporting framework which enables Council to identify and respond to community aspirations and co-ordinate the provision of appropriate works and services to help achieve the city’s strategic objectives.  The documents have been informed by the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Council has undertaken a number of initiatives to assist the community recovery due to COVID-19, flooding and bushfires and will continue to monitor the needs of the community and provide assistance where it is able to without a detrimental impact on essential service provision.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The development and implementation of the Delivery Program, Operational Plan, Budgets and Fees and Charges documents are accommodated within Council’s budget structure.  This expenditure is monitored through Council’s monthly and quarterly budget reviews.

Risk Analysis:

The draft Delivery Program, Operational Plan, Budgets and Fees and Charges documents are a legislative requirement and were placed on public exhibition prior to their final adoption by Council.  This provided an opportunity for community engagement in the review of these documents and reduces Council’s risk, by giving the community an opportunity to provide public submissions on Council’s proposed activities.

Consultation:

The Draft Delivery Program 2017-2022, 2021/22 Draft Operational Plan, 2021/22 Draft Budget and 2021/22 Draft Fees and Charges were placed on public exhibition for a 28-day period from Friday 14 May until Friday 11 June 2021.

 

The draft documents could be accessed via the Have Your Say section of Council’s website:  www.coffsharbour.nsw.gov.au.  Printed copies were also displayed at Council’s Administration Centre and at the three branches of the City Library (Coffs Harbour, Woolgoolga and Toormina).

 

The public exhibition process was promoted on Council’s website and in the media.  All promotional material encouraged the community to consider the draft documents and provide feedback to Council.  Community submissions could be made online or by mail.

 

During the public exhibition period Council received three submissions as follows:

 

-     Request for Council to confirm if the annual park run at Park Beach Reserve can continue free of charge.

Comment:  Whilst Council is unable to waive this annual Licence Fee, the fee has been paid in full from the Donations by Council Program in the current financial year.

-     Request for Council to contribute $2.1 million (50% of the cost of $4.2 million) for the Jetty Memorial Theatre expansion.

Comment:  At this point in time, Council has not included additional funds for the Jetty Memorial Theatre expansion, however it has been identified as a project to be delivered (subject to grant funding).

-     Request for Council to allocate $100,000 for an officer to explore Council’s role in social and affordable housing.

Comment:  No funding has been included in the 21/22 budgets. In accordance with Council’s resolution of 13 May 2021, investigations into Council’s role in affordable housing / social housing is underway and will be reported back to Council.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Sections 404 and 405 of the Local Government Act 1993 detail requirements in relation to a Council’s Delivery Program and Operational Plan.

 

Additional requirements for the Operational Plan are set out in Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 – Clause 201 (relating to the content of Council’s annual statement of revenue policy) and Clause 203 (relating to reporting requirements for budget review statements and estimates revisions).

Implementation Date / Priority:

Subject to Council approval, the finalised documents will be posted on Council’s website by 30 June 2021.

Conclusion:

The public exhibition of the draft 2017-2022 Delivery Program (Year 5) and supporting documents has concluded.  Community submissions have been considered during the subsequent review of the draft documents.

 

The revised documents represent a considered and responsible strategy that will enable Council to continue to meet the needs of the community in the Coffs Harbour local government area, while maintaining the long-term financial sustainability of the organisation.

 

It is recommended that Council adopt the 2017-2022 Delivery Program (Year 5), 2021/22 Operational Plan, Delivery Program Budgets 2021/22, and 2021/22 Fees and Charges, in line with the timeframes and legislative requirements set out in the Integrated Planning and Reporting provisions of the Local Government Act.

 

 


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GM21/09      Making of Rates and Charges 2021/22

Author:                        Section Leader Financial Support

Authoriser:                  Section Leader Financial Support

MyCoffs:                      B.1 A thriving and sustainable local economy

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

The rates and annual charges for 2021/22 have to be formally ‘made’ under Section 535 of the Local Government Act, 1993, by Council resolution.  The rates and charges are required to be made by 1 August of each year.

 

The Ordinary Rate structure detailed in this report incorporates an increase in Council’s General Income of 2% for 2021/22, being the rate peg approved by IPART.

 

This report seeks adoption of Rates and Charges which are required to achieve income yields in support of Council’s 2021/22 Operational Plan.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Make an Ordinary Rate - Residential, pursuant to Section 494 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of (0.34439 cents) in the dollar with a Base Amount of $419.00 for all rateable land in the Coffs Harbour LGA categorised as ‘Residential’.

2.       Make an Ordinary Rate – Business, pursuant to Section 494 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of (0.86783 cents) in the dollar with a minimum rate of $661.00 for all rateable land in the Coffs Harbour LGA categorised as ‘Business’ except land under the sub-category of Business named ‘City Centre Business’.

3.       Make an Ordinary Rate – City Centre Business, pursuant to Section 494 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of (0.89102 cents) in the dollar with a minimum rate of $661.00 for all rateable land in the Coffs Harbour LGA sub-categorised as ‘City Centre Business’.

4.       Make an Ordinary Rate – Farmland, pursuant to Section 494 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of (0.34439 cents) in the dollar and a Base Amount of $419.00 for all rateable land in the Coffs Harbour LGA categorised as ‘Farmland’.

5.       Make a Special Rate – Environmental, pursuant to Section 495 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 on all rateable land in the Coffs Harbour LGA of (0.00972 cents) in the dollar with a Base Amount of $22.39.

6.       Make an Annual Charge for Domestic Waste Service – Occupied, pursuant to Section 496 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 on all occupied rateable land, categorised Residential or Farmland, to which a domestic waste service is (or able to be) provided.

The amount of the annual charge will be the amount derived by applying the formula: C = S x UD

Where 'C' equals the annual charge, 'S' equals the number of general waste bins provided to the parcel of land or lot in a strata plan for collection or the number of separate occupations, or one (1), whichever is the greater, and 'UD' (Unit Price Domestic Waste) is $695.00.

Subsidiary (or extra) Domestic Waste Services pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 will incur the following annual charges per service:

6.1     Domestic General Waste Service - $312.00

6.2     Domestic Recycling Service - $115.00

6.3     Domestic Recycle Upgrade Service - $42.00

6.4     Domestic Organic Waste Service - $198.00

6.5     Domestic Supply of Bins Service - $125.00

6.6     Domestic Bin Reinstatement Fee - $105.00 per bin

7.       Make an Annual Charge for Domestic Waste – Vacant Land, pursuant to Section 496 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $176.00, on all vacant rateable land categorised Residential and Farmland, to which a domestic waste service is available.

8.       Make an Annual Charge for Non-Domestic Waste – Occupied, pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act for 2021/2022 on all occupied rateable land categorised Business or sub-categorised City Centre Business, to which a waste collection service is provided (or is able to be provided).

The amount of the annual charge will be the amount derived by applying the formula:
C = S x UB, where 'C' equals the annual charge, 'S' equals the number of general waste bins provided to the parcel of land or lot in a strata plan for collection or the number of separate occupations, or one (1) whichever is the greater and 'UB' (Unit
Price - Non Domestic) is $695.00.

Subsidiary (or extra) Non-Domestic Waste Services pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 will incur the following annual charges per service:

8.1     Non-Domestic General Waste Service - $312.00

8.2     Non-Domestic Recycling Service - $115.00

8.3     Non-Domestic Recycle Upgrade Service - $42.00

8.4     Non-Domestic Organic Waste Service - $198.00

8.5     Non-Domestic Supply of Bins Service - $125.00

8.6     Non-Domestic Bin Reinstatement Fee - $105.00 per bin

9.       Make an Annual Charge for Non-Domestic Waste – Vacant Land, pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $176.00, on all vacant rateable land categorised Business or sub-categorised City Centre Business to which a non-domestic waste service is available.

10.     Make an Annual Charge for Non-Rateable (Non-Domestic) Waste Service, pursuant to Section 496(2) of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 on all occupied non-rateable properties to which a waste collection service is provided.

The amount of the annual charge will be the amount derived by applying the formula:

C = S x UN, where 'C' equals the annual charge, 'S' equals the number of general waste bins provided for collection or the number of separate occupations, or one (1) whichever is the greater and 'UN' (Unit Price Non-Rateable) is $695.00.

Subsidiary (or extra) Non-Rateable (Non-Domestic) Waste Services pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 will incur the following annual charges per service:

10.1   Non-Rateable General Waste Service - $312.00

10.2   Non-Rateable Recycling Service - $115.00

10.3   Non-Rateable Recycle Upgrade Service - $42.00

10.4   Non-Rateable Organic Waste Service - $198.00

10.5   Non-Rateable Supply of Bins Service - $125.00

10.6   Non-Rateable Bin Reinstatement Fee - $105.00 per bin

11.     Make an Annual Charge – Sewerage Access Charge, pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 on all rateable land categorised Residential or Farmland, EXCEPT land prescribed under Section 552 (3) (a) and (b) of the Local Government Act.

The amount of the annual charge will be $958.00 per occupation or $661.00 for vacant land.

 

12.     Make an Annual Charge – Sewerage Access Charge, pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 on all rateable land categorised Business or within the Business subcategory ‘City Centre Business’ EXCEPT land prescribed under Section 552(3) (a) and (b) of the Local Government Act.

The amount of the annual charge will be:

For vacant land - $661.00.

For occupied land the charge will be calculated using the formula:

SDF x MF x AC factor (with a minimum charge of $661.00).

Where:      SDF = Sewer Discharge Factor

MF = Meter Factor (refer to table 1 below)

AC factor = $938.00 (charge for 2021/2022).

Where no Council water service is installed on an occupied property (and able to be connected to the sewerage system) a Meter Factor (MF) equal to one (1) and a Sewer Discharge Factor (SDF) equal to 95% will be assumed for the calculation of the annual sewer access charge (i.e. 1 x 95% x $938.00 = $891.10).

Table 1 - Meter Charge Factors - Annual Sewer Access Charge (Non-Residential)

Meter Size

(in mm)

Charge

Factor

Meter Size

(in mm)

Charge

Factor

Meter Size

(in mm)

Charge

Factor

15

1.00

40

4.00

100

25.00

20

1.00

50

6.30

150

56.30

25

1.60

65

10.60

200

100.00

32

2.60

80

16.00

Fire Service

Nil

 

13.     Make an Annual Charge – Private Sewer Pump Station Management Charge, pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 on all rateable land.

The amount of the annual charge will be $147.00 per private sewer pump station.

14.     Make an Annual Fee for On-site Sewage Administration (low risk systems), pursuant to Section 608 of the Local Government Act for 2021/2022 on each property on which an on-site sewage management system(s) is installed.

The amount of the fee will be the amount derived by applying the formula:

C = OS x UPL where 'C' equals the annual fee, 'OS' equals the number of on-site sewage management systems and 'UPL' (Unit Price) is $36.50 for low risk on-site sewage systems.

15.     Make an Annual Fee for On-site Sewage Administration (medium risk systems), pursuant to Section 608 of the Local Government Act for 2021/2022 on each property on which an on-site sewage management system is installed.

The amount of the fee will be the amount derived by applying the formula:

C = OS x UPM here 'C' equals the annual fee, 'OS' equals the number of on-site sewage management systems and 'UPM' (Unit Price) is $73.00 for medium risk on-site sewage systems.

16.     Make an Annual Fee for On-site Sewage Administration (high risk systems), pursuant to Section 608 of the Local Government Act for 2021/2022 on each property on which an on-site sewage management system is installed.

The amount of the fee will be the amount derived by applying the formula:

C = OS x UPH where 'C' equals the annual fee, 'OS' equals the number of on-site sewage management systems and 'UPH' (Unit Price) is $219.00 for high risk on-site sewage systems.

17.     Make an Annual Charge – Water Access Charge, pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 on all rateable land categorised Residential or Farmland EXCEPT: Land prescribed under Section 552(2) of the Local Government Act (or) Farmland rated properties using water for a commercial farming purpose.

The amounts of the annual charge will be:

17.1.  For vacant land or land comprising a single residential dwelling or a lot within a strata plan - $152.00.

17.2.  For land on which is erected a building or buildings adapted for two or more separate occupations, including (but not limited to) a dual occupancy or residential flat building(s) not being part of a strata plan, the amount derived by applying the formula AC = T x $152.00 where 'AC' equals the Annual Charge, 'T' equals the number of separate occupations.

18.     Make an Annual Charge – Water Access Charges, pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 on all rateable land categorised Business (and sub-category City Centre Business) or Farmland except: Land prescribed under Section 552(2) of the Local Government Act (or) Farmland rated properties using water for a residential purpose.

The amount of the annual charges will be:

18.1.  For vacant land or occupied land that is not connected to the water supply - $152.00.

18.2.  For land not included in (1) above the amount is derived by applying the formula: AC = MF x $152.00 where 'AC' equals the Annual Charge, 'MF' equals the aggregate of the charge factors for all meters on the property (see table 2 below for charge factors), and $152.00 is the unit price.

Table 2 – Meter Charge Factors - Water Access Charge (Non-Residential)

Meter Size

(in mm)

Charge

Factor

Meter Size

(in mm)

Charge

Factor

Meter Size

(in mm)

Charge

Factor

15

1.00

40

4.00

100

25.00

20

1.00

50

6.30

150

56.30

25

1.60

65

10.60

200

100.00

32

2.60

80

16.00

Fire Service

1.00

 

19.     Make an Annual Charge - Water Backflow Charge, pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $16.50 per testable backflow device on rateable properties under the category of Residential or Farmland in respect of land prescribed under Section 552(1).

20.     Make an Annual Charge - Water Backflow Charge, pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $66.00 for the first testable backflow device and $16.50 for any additional testable backflow device(s) on rateable properties under the category of Business or sub-category of City Centre Business in respect of land prescribed under Section 552(1).

21.     Make an Annual Charge for Recycled Water Access and Licencing Charge, pursuant to section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022, of $447.00 per year - to be equivalent to 3x the potable Residential Water Access Charge

22.     Make an Annual Charge for Effluent Removal, pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $557.00 for each system able to be connected to the sewerage system (properties with this charge applied may also be charged an annual sewer access charge).

23.     Make an Annual Charge for Effluent Removal, pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $557.00 for each system not yet on Council’s subsidised pump-out service and not able to be connected to the sewerage system.

24.     Make an Annual Charge for Effluent Removal (Special), pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $958.00 for each system not able to be connected to the sewerage system.  A subsidised effluent pump-out service is provided with this charge.

25.     Make an Annual Charge for Trade Waste, pursuant to Section 501 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022.  This annual charge is based on the number of trade waste generators at each property.

Table three shows the annual charge applicable for a particular number of trade waste generators at a property.

Table 3 – Annual Charge for Trade Waste

Number of Trade

Waste Generators

Annual Trade

Waste Charge

1

   $226.00

2 to 4

   $452.00

5 to 9

 $1,073.50

10 to 14

$2,090.50

15 to 19

$3,107.50

20 to 24

$4,068.00

25 to 29

$4,972.00

30 to 34

$5,876.00

>34

$6,780.00

Dump Point

  $455.00

 

26.     Make a Water Usage Charge for a property of a Residential nature, pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $3.25 per kilolitre for each kilolitre of water registered, up to a daily average of one (1) kilolitre per occupation for the period read; this is to be known as the Tier 1 (or Step 1) water usage charge.

27.     Make a Water Usage Charge for a property of a Residential nature, pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $4.88 per kilolitre for each kilolitre of water registered, over a daily average of one (1) kilolitre per occupation for the period read; this is to be known as the Tier 2 (or Step 2) water usage charge.

28.     Make a Water Usage Charge (Raw Water Supply), pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $1.63 per kilolitre for each kilolitre of water registered, up to a daily average of one (1) kilolitre per occupation supplied for the period read, this is to be known as the Tier 1 (or Step 1) raw water usage charge.

29.     Make a Water Usage Charge (Raw Water Supply), pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $2.44 per kilolitre for each kilolitre of water registered, over a daily average of one (1) kilolitre per occupation supplied for the period read, this is to be known as the Tier 2 (or Step 2) raw water usage charge.

30.     Make a Water Usage Charge, pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $3.25 per kilolitre for each kilolitre of water registered on any meter fitted to any Non-Residential property.

31.     Make a Water Usage Charge, pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $9.75 per kilolitre for each kilolitre of water registered on any meter fitted for providing a fire service at a property.

32.     Make a Recycled Water Usage Charge, pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $0.00 per kilolitre, for usage up to their allocated supply volume for non-rateable, non-commercial and sporting bodies who can demonstrate a not-for-profit operating model.

33.     Make a Recycled Water Usage Charge, pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $0.20 per kilolitre – up to the allocated supply volume for all other users.  

34.     Make a Recycled Water Usage Charge, pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $2.00 per kilolitre, for usage which is in excess of the allocated supply volume for all users, including non-rateable, non-commercial and sporting bodies.

35.     Make a Sewer Usage Charge, pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022 of $2.41 per kilolitre.  Sewerage discharge is based on water usage and varies depending on Sewer Discharge Factors (SDF) allocated to individual water meters on individual properties. Usage is generally determined with the use of meters, which in certain circumstances may not be directly connected to Council’s water supply.

36.     Make a Trade Waste Usage Charge (for compliant trade waste discharge – Charge Category 2 generators), pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for the 2021/2022 charge period of $1.99 per kilolitre.

37.     Make a Trade Waste Usage Charge (for non-compliant trade waste discharge – Charge Category 1 generators), pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for the 2021/2022 charge period of $1.99 per kilolitre.

38.     Make a Trade Waste Usage Charge (for non-compliant trade waste discharge – Charge Category 2 generators), pursuant to Section 502 of the Local Government Act, for the 2021/2022 charge period of $18.15 per kilolitre.

39.     Make an Annual Stormwater Management Service Charge, pursuant to Section 496A of the Local Government Act, for 2021/2022, to be applied against rateable properties categorised as Business or Residential within Council’s stormwater catchments.  The amount of the annual charges will be:

39.1.  Residential properties (not being strata units) - a flat charge of $25.00 will apply.

39.2.  For Residential Strata Units - a flat charge of $12.50 will apply.

39.3.  For Business properties (not being strata units) the charge is based on total (estimated) impervious land area using the following criteria:

Divide the total impervious land area by 350 square metres.  This will result in an amount which, (rounded up to the nearest whole number) is multiplied by $25.00.  This annual charge will therefore be an amount divisible by $25.00 with the minimum charge being $25.00 for properties having a land area of 350 square metres or less.

39.4.  For Business Strata Units (in a complex containing only business units) - the charge is determined by a method similar to that detailed in point (III) above, except that the total land area charge for the strata complex (being a multiple of the $25.00 charge) is further apportioned to individual strata units within the complex using the unit entitlement recorded for each unit.  A minimum charge of $5.00 per strata unit applies to calculated charges less than this amount.

39.5.  For Business Strata Units (in a mixed complex containing residential units) – the charge for these units will be the same as residential strata units being a flat charge of $12.50.

40.     Make an Interest Charge of 6.0%, pursuant to Section 566 of the Local Government Act, for the period 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022 being the maximum amount determined by the Minister for Local Government; calculated daily on a simple basis, on overdue rates and charges (EXCEPT water, sewer and trade waste usage charges).

 

Report

Description of Item:

The rates and annual charges for 2021/22 have to be formally ‘made’ under Section 535 of the Local Government Act, 1993, by Council resolution.  The rates and charges are required to be made by 1 August each year.

 

The Ordinary Rate structure detailed in this report incorporates an increase in Council’s General Income of 2% for 2021/22, being the rate peg approved by IPART.

 

The following Rates and Charges are proposed to be ‘made’ for 2021/22:

 

1.    Ordinary (General) Rates (Section 494)

·   Residential – 0.34439 cents in the dollar with a Base amount of $419.00

·   Business – 0.86783 cents in the dollar with a Minimum of $661.00

·   Business (City Centre Business) – 0.89102 cents in the dollar with a Minimum of $661.00

·   Farmland – 0.34439 cents in the dollar with a Base amount of $419.00

 

2.    Environmental (Special) Rate (Section 495)

·   Environmental – 0.00972 cents in the dollar with a Base Amount of $22.39.

 

3.    Waste Management Charges (Sections 496, 496(2) and 501)

·   Domestic Waste – Occupied - $695.00 per service

·   Domestic Waste – Subsidiary General Waste Charge - $312.00 per service

·   Domestic Waste – Subsidiary Recycling Charge - $115.00 per service

·   Domestic Waste – Subsidiary Recycling Upgrade Charge - $42.00 per upgrade

·   Domestic Waste – Subsidiary Organic Waste Charge - $198.00 per service

·   Domestic Waste – Supply of Bins Charge - $125.00 per service

·   Domestic Waste – Bins Reinstatement Fee - $105.00 per bin

·   Domestic Waste – Vacant Land - $176.00 per assessment

·   Non-Domestic Waste – Occupied - $695.00 per service

·   Non-Domestic Waste – Subsidiary General Waste Charge - $312.00 per service

·   Non-Domestic Waste – Subsidiary Recycling Charge - $115.00 per service

·   Non-Domestic Waste – Subsidiary Recycling Upgrade Charge - $42.00 per upgrade

·   Non-Domestic Waste - Subsidiary Organic Waste Charge - $198.00 per service

·   Non-Domestic Waste - Supply of Bins Charge - $125.00 per service

·   Non-Domestic Waste - Bin Reinstatement Fee - $105.00 per bin

·   Non-Domestic Waste - Vacant Land - $176.00 per assessment

·   Non-Domestic Waste (Non-Rateable) - $695.00 per service

·   Non-Domestic Waste (Non-Rateable) - Subsidiary General Waste Charge - $312.00 per service

·   Non-Domestic Waste (Non-Rateable) - Subsidiary Recycling Charge - $115.00 per service

·   Non-Domestic Waste (Non-Rateable) - Subsidiary Recycling Upgrade Charge - $42.00 per upgrade

·   Non-Domestic Waste (Non-Rateable) - Subsidiary Organic Waste Charge - $198.00 per service

·   Non-Domestic Waste (Non-Rateable) - Supply of Bins Charge - $125.00 per service

·   Non-Domestic Waste (Non-Rateable) -  Bin Reinstatement Fee - $105.00 per bin

 

4.    Sewerage Access Charges (Sections 501 and 502)

·   Residential Properties - $958.00 per occupation

·   Non-Residential Properties - Calculated using the formula: SDF x MF x AC (with a minimum charge of $661.00)

 

Where:     SDF = Sewer Discharge Factor

MF = Meter Factor (see table below)

AC Factor = Access Charge = $938.00

 

Meter Size

(in mm)

Meter

Factor

Meter Size

(in mm)

Meter

Factor

Meter Size

(in mm)

Meter

Factor

15

1.00

40

4.00

100

25.00

20

1.00

50

6.30

150

56.30

25

1.60

65

10.60

200

100.00

32

2.60

80

16.00

Fire Service

Nil

 

5.    Sewerage Access Charges – Vacant Properties (Section 552)

·   Residential Vacant - $661.00 per assessment

·   Non-Residential Vacant - $661.00 per assessment

 

6.    Private Pump Station Annual Management Charge (Section 501)

·   $147.00 per sewer pump station

 

7.    Onsite Sewage Administration Fee (Section 608)

·   $36.50 per system (low risk)

·   $73.00 per system (medium risk)

·   $219.00 per system (high risk)

 

8.    Water Access Charges (Sections 501 and 552)

·   Residential Properties - $152.00 per occupation

·   Non-Residential Properties - $152.00 per meter factor (MF) (see table below)    

·   Water Backflow Charge (Residential) - $16.50 per testable backflow device

·   Water Backflow Charge (Non-Residential) - $66.00 for the first testable backflow device then $16.50 for any additional testable devices.

 

Meter Size

(in mm)

Meter

Factor

Meter Size

(in mm)

Meter

Factor

Meter Size

(in mm)

Meter

Factor

15

1.00

40

4.00

100

25.00

20

1.00

50

6.30

150

56.30

25

1.60

65

10.60

200

100.00

32

2.60

80

16.00

Fire Service

1.00

 

9.    Water Access Charges – Vacant Properties (Section 552)

·   Residential Vacant - $152.00 per assessment

·   Non-Residential Vacant - $152.00 per assessment

 

10.  Recycled Water Access Charges – (Section 501)

·   $447.00 per year - to be equivalent to 3x the potable Residential Water Access Charge

 

11.  Effluent Service Charge (Section 501)

·   $557.00 per service

 

12.  Effluent Service Charge (Special) (Section 501)

·   $958.00 per service

 

13.  Trade Waste Annual Charge: (based on number of trade waste generators) (Section 501)

·   1 generator - $226.00

·   2 to 4 generators - $452.00

·   5 to 9 generators - $1,073.50

·   10 to 14 generators - $2,090.50

·   15 to 19 generators - $3,107.50

·   20 to 24 generators - $4,068.00

·   25 to 29 generators - $4,972.00

·   30 to 34 generators - $5,876.00

·   > 34 generators - $6,780.00

·   Dump Point - $455.00

 

14.  Water Usage Charges – Residential / Non-Rateable (Residential nature) (Section 502)

·   Tier 1 (up to 1KL per day, averaged over reading period) - $3.25 per kilolitre

·   Tier 2 (over 1KL per day) - $4.88 per kilolitre

 

15.  Water Usage Charges – Non-Residential / Non-Rateable (Section 502)

·   $3.25 per kilolitre for all water used

 

16.  Water Usage Charges – Raw Water Supply (Section 502)

·   Tier 1 (up to 1KL per day, averaged over reading period) - $1.63 per kilolitre

·   Tier 2 (over 1KL per day) - $2.44 per kilolitre

 

17.  Water Usage Charges – Fire Service (Section 502)

·   $9.75 per kilolitre for all water used (except for usage, supported by evidence related to firefighting)

 

18.  Recycled Water Charges – (Section 502)

·   $0.00 per kilolitre, for usage up to their allocated supply volume for non-rateable, non-commercial and sporting bodies who can demonstrate a not-for-profit operating model.

·   $0.20 per kilolitre, up to the allocated supply volume for all other users.  

·   $2.00 per kilolitre, for usage which is in excess of the allocated supply volume for all users, including non-rateable, non-commercial and sporting bodies

 

19.  Sewer Usage Charges – Non-Residential / Non-Rateable (Section 502)

·   Sewer Discharge Factor (SDF) x $2.41 per kilolitre (based on water usage)

 

20.  Trade Waste Usage Charges – Non-Residential / Non-Rateable (Section 502)

Non-Compliant trade waste discharge for Charge Category 1 generators

·   Trade Waste Discharge Factor (TWDF) x $1.99 per KL (based on water usage)

 

Compliant trade waste discharge for Charge Category 2 generators

·   Trade Waste Discharge Factor (TWDF) x $1.99 per KL (based on water usage)

 

Non-Compliant trade waste discharge for Charge Category 2 generators

·   Trade Waste Discharge Factor (TWDF) x $18.15 per KL (based on water usage)

 

21.  Stormwater Service Charges (Section 496A)

·   Residential Properties (except strata units) - $25.00 per property

·   Residential Strata Units - $12.50 per property

·   Business Properties – per property (amounts based on land area @ $25.00 per 350 sq. m)

·   Business Strata Units (mixed development with residential units) - $12.50 per property

·   Business Strata Units (in a complex having business units only) – $12.50 per property (amounts based on land area and unit entitlement) – Minimum charge of $5.00 applies to each unit.

 

22.  Interest on overdue rates and charges (Section 566)

·   Council will apply an interest rate of 6.0% from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022 (as determined by the Minister for Local Government) calculated daily on a simple basis, on overdue rates and charges.

Issues:

This report seeks adoption of Rates and Charges that are required to achieve income yields in support of Council’s 2021/22 Operational Plan.

Options:

This report is to enable Council to ‘make’ its Rates and Charges for 2021/22 under Section 535 of the Local Government Act, 1993 so they can be levied and issued within required timeframes.  At this time, the following options are available to Council:

 

1.    Adopt the recommendation provided to Council, which this will enable Council to levy the Rates and Charges for 2021/22 as specified.

2.    Amend the recommendation provided to Council and then adopt. Depending on the nature of the amendment, this may have an impact on revenue yields.

3.    Reject the recommendation provided to Council.  If the proposed Rates and Charges for 2021/22 detailed in this report are not ‘made’ by Council adoption, another report detailing an alternate structure will need to be considered by Council before the end of July 2021 to enable rate notices for 2021/22 to be issued within the required timeframe.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no related environmental implications for Council.

•     Social

There are no related social implications for Council.

•     Civic Leadership

Rates and Charges are an essential component of Council's revenue platform which fund works and services aimed at achieving the objectives of the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Council’s Rates and Charges must be adopted by Council so that rate notices and usage accounts can be issued in 2021/22.  Failure to issue such accounts would detrimentally affect Council’s ability to fund expenditure and deliver services.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The Rates and Charges detailed in this report will generate anticipated income for 2021/22 in support of Council’s ongoing financial strategy through the Long Term Financial Plan to achieve financial sustainability.

Risk Analysis:

Rates and Charges are required by legislation to be adopted (made) by Council before being levied for 2021/22.  Failure to levy these rates and charges would detrimentally affect Council’s ability to deliver essential services.

Consultation:

The rates and charges in this report have been considered as part of the preparation and adoption of Council’s 2021/22 Operational Plan.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Each year Council is required to adopt its rates and charges.  The adoption of a budget structure is a requirement under the Local Government Act 1993.

Implementation Date / Priority:

The rates and charges detailed in this report will apply to the 2021/22 financial year.

Conclusion:

This report summarises the Rates and Charges to be ‘made’ for 2021/22 pursuant to Sections 494-496, 501-502 and 608 of the Local Government Act 1993 in support of Council’s ongoing financial strategy through the Long Term Financial Plan to achieve financial sustainability.

 

 


BS21/31       2021-2022 Environmental Levy Grants Program

Author:                        Grants Administration Officer

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

MyCoffs:                      C.2 A natural environment sustained for the future

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

This report provides Council with the recommended projects for the 2021/22 Environmental Levy Grants Program (ELGP) for inclusion in the 2021/22 Operational Plan.  The Environmental Levy funding allocated for the 2021/22 Environmental Levy Grants Program pool is $366,149, being 25% of the total Environmental Levy funding pool.

 

Council received 19 submissions for the 2021/22 Environmental Levy Grants Program with 18 submissions recommended by the Environmental Levy Grants Program Panel to receive funding.

 

Recommendation:

That Council approves the following projects to be funded from the 2021/22 Environmental Levy Grants Program pool:

 

Applicant

Project Name

Amount ($)

Jetty Dunecare

Restore and Enhance the Natural Environment of Boambee Beach North

25,000

Jetty Dunecare

Restore and Enhance the Natural Environment of Jetty Foreshores

25,000

Jetty Dunecare

Pre-empting the Sleeping Invader - Glory Lily @ Boambee Beach

25,000

Coffs Harbour and District Local Aboriginal Land Council

Improving Our Coast – Part 2

25,000

Nana Glen Landcare Group

Rehabilitating the Coldwater Creek Travelling Stock Reserve (TSR39744) – Phase 2

15,000

Coffs Harbour Regional Landcare

Growing Our Future 2021/2022

24,695

Coffs Harbour Regional Landcare

Improving Land Management Practices in the Coffs LGA

15,000

University of New England

Ecohealth website for Coffs coastal catchments

20,000

Envite

Boambee East/Toormina Koala Corridor Improvement

20,000

Envite

Upper Bonville Riparian Restoration Action Stage 2

20,000

Envite

Coffs Harbour Native Seedbank Network

16,012

Jaliigirr Biodiversity Alliance

Surveying Platypus Populations in the Orara Valley Using eDNA Technology

20,000

Jaliigirr Biodiversity Alliance

Canine Scent Detectives and Genetics Analysis Promoting Koala Population Health in Jaliigirr Corridors – Stage 2

20,000

Applicant

Project Name

Amount ($)

Sandy Beach Action Group

Revegetation of Sandy Beach Reserve Stage 4

7,000

Southern Cross University

Catchment Scale Dissolved Metals Export into Coffs Coast Estuaries

25,000

Southern Cross University

Further Investigating Trace Metal Pollution in Sandy Beach

25,000

Southern Cross University

Valuation of Water Quality Regulation Services by Shellfish in Woolgoolga Lake

20,000

Woolgoolga Lake Working Group

Caring for our Waterways – Stage 2

18,442

Total

366,149

 

Report

Description of Item:

Council invited submissions for funding from the 2021/22 Environmental Levy Grants Program between Friday 12 March 2021 and Friday 16 April 2021.  A total of 19 submissions were received requesting total funding of $429,066.

 

The majority of applications are recommended with the full amount requested.  Eight applications are recommended with reduced funding, and one application was not recommended by the panel.

 

The Environmental Levy Grants Program Panel’s recommended 2021/22 Environmental Levy Grants Program allocations are shown in the table below.

 

Applicant

Project Name

Amount Requested $

Amount Recommended $

Jetty Dunecare

Restore and Enhance the Natural Environment of Boambee Beach North

25,000

25,000

Jetty Dunecare

Restore and Enhance the Natural Environment of Jetty Foreshores

25,000

25,000

Jetty Dunecare

Pre-empting the Sleeping Invader - Glory Lily @ Boambee Beach

25,000

25,000

Coffs Harbour and District Local Aboriginal Land Council

Improving Our Coast – Part 2

25,000

25,000

Nana Glen Landcare Group

Rehabilitating the Coldwater Creek Travelling Stock Reserve (TSR39744) – Phase 2

15,000

15,000

Coffs Harbour Regional Landcare

Growing Our Future 2021/2022

24,695

24,695

Coffs Harbour Regional Landcare

Improving Land Management Practices in the Coffs LGA

 25,000

15,000

University of New England

Ecohealth website for Coffs coastal catchments

24,000

 

20,000

Envite

Boambee East/Toormina Koala Corridor Improvement

24,966

20,000

Envite

Upper Bonville Riparian Restoration Action Stage 2

24,985

20,000

Envite

Coffs Harbour Native Seedbank Network

16,012

16,012

Jaliigirr Biodiversity Alliance

Surveying Platypus Populations in the Orara Valley Using eDNA Technology

25,000

20,000

Jaliigirr Biodiversity Alliance

Canine Scent Detectives and Genetics Analysis Promoting Koala Population Health in Jaliigirr Corridors – Stage 2

25,000

20,000

Sandy Beach Action Group

Revegetation of Sandy Beach Reserve Stage 4

7,000

7,000

Southern Cross University

Catchment Scale Dissolved Metals Export into Coffs Coast Estuaries

25,000

25,000

Southern Cross University

Further Investigating Trace Metal Pollution in Sandy Beach

25,000

25,000

Southern Cross University

Valuation of Water Quality Regulation Services by Shellfish in Woolgoolga Lake

25,000

20,000

Woolgoolga Lake Working Group

Caring for our Waterways – Stage 2

24,659

18,442

Total amount requested and recommended

411,317

366,149

Funding source - Environmental Levy Grants Program (25% pool)

366,149

 

Remaining funds to be rolled over for use in future rounds

0

 

 

 

Projects not recommended

Amount Requested  $

Coffs Harbour Regional Landcare

Keeping Coffs Harbour Cane Toad Free

17,749

Total amount requested for projects not recommended

17,749

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Details of the 19 submissions are provided as follows:

 

1.    Jetty Dunecare Group – Restore and Enhance the Natural Environment of Boambee Beach North

 

This project will restore and protect the biodiversity of 35ha of native vegetation on Boambee Beach North.  This will be achieved by undertaking primary weeding in areas yet attended to.  Repeated follow up and maintenance of areas previously worked will continue.  Fox and feral cat monitoring and control will be ongoing as well as community education.  The work will be undertaken by bush regeneration contractors and volunteers of the Jetty Dunecare Group who began working to restore this area 9 years ago.  This work not only reduces the degrading impacts of invasive species, but also helps to engender community stewardship for the local natural environment.

 

Requested amount:                       $25,000

Panel recommended amount:      $25,000

 

2.    Jetty Dunecare Group – Restore and Enhance the Natural Environment of Jetty Foreshores

 

This project will restore, enhance and protect the biodiversity and visual amenity of the 18 hectares of native vegetation along the Coffs Harbour Jetty foreshores and Coffs Creek entrance south side, an area that contains endangered ecological communities and a threatened plant species.  This will be achieved through bush regeneration works (including primary weeding in new areas and maintenance of existing areas) by both contractors and volunteers.

 

Requested amount:                       $25,000

Panel recommended amount:      $25,000

 

3.    Jetty Dunecare Group – Pre-empting the Sleeping Invader – Glory Lily @ Boambee Beach

 

This project's major focus will be to continue the effective management of Glory Lily behind Boambee Beach especially in areas where woody weeds have been and will be removed as this species has the capacity to undermine restoration efforts.  The project will capitalise on previous experience and achievements while focusing on areas yet to be managed.  Continued restoration efforts will combine a strategic spray regime with manual follow up post woody weed control.  This will improve connectivity of north and south Boambee and enhance integrity and resilience of the entire site (from Coffs Harbour to Sawtell).

 

Requested amount:                       $25,000

Panel recommended amount:      $25,000

 

4.    Coffs Harbour and District Local Aboriginal Lands Council – Improving Our Coast – Part 2

 

This project aims to build upon the rehabilitation undertaken by the Darrunda Wajaarr Rangers from the previous grant round of 15 ha of coastal vegetation within Moonee Beach Nature Reserve and Coffs Coast Regional Park.  The project will continue to enhance Endangered Ecological Communities’ (EEC’s) Littoral Rainforest and Themeda headland grasslands and threatened species Zieria prostrata, Pultenaea maritima, Thesium austral and Sophora tomentosa, with restoration continuing at 5 high priority work sites: Back Sandy Midden Site, Look-at-Me-Now Headland, Norman Hill, Sapphire SEPP and Charlesworth Bay.

 

Requested amount:                       $25,000

Panel recommended amount:      $25,000

 

 

5.    Nana Glen Landcare Group – Rehabilitating the Coldwater Creek Travelling Stock Reserve (TSR39744) – Phase 2

 

With previous and existing phases funded by the Environmental Levy Grants Program, work continues on the Coldwater Creek Travelling Stock Reserve which is 5.4 hectares of wet sclerophyll forest at Nana Glen in the iconic Orara Valley.  Fire and floods have severely impacted this site, with significant weed growth continuing, and track erosion in the lower portion of the block.  This phase of the project seeks to create a better space for community activity (such as workshops), to continue the bush regeneration, and for assistance with the material cost of installing the signage in and around the site.

 

Requested amount:                       $15,000

Panel recommended amount:      $15,000

 

6.    Coffs Harbour Regional Landcare – Growing Our Future 2021/22

 

This project will fund the employment of a suitably qualified and experienced Nursery Coordinator. Employing the coordinator has meant that strong volunteer support, quality plant production, functional & safe nursery infrastructure, community education and good expert advice has been realised.  The benefits of having a supply of good quality local plant species for restoration projects means that stakeholders can be assured that local restoration projects using these plants will enhance and protect the diversity of our natural environment.  Regional Landcare has started engaging more with schools with the Community nursery providing a good opportunity to provide support and assist with their sustainability projects.

 

Requested amount:                       $24,695

Panel recommended amount:      $24,695

 

7.    Coffs Harbour Regional Landcare – Improving Land Management Practices in the Coffs LGA

 

This project will engage small landholders that hold two to twenty hectares in the Coffs Harbour LGA.  Small 'lifestyle' property owners and new landholders who have bought property in the area for a ‘sea/tree change’ often lack the knowledge, resources and understanding of their responsibilities to manage Natural Resource Management issues on their properties.  The project will aim to educate landholders on best practice land management including biosecurity, erosion mitigation, nutrient run-off and waterway health, natural area restoration, habitat connectivity and enhancing biodiversity.

 

Requested amount:                       $25,000

Panel recommended amount:      $15,000

 

8.    University of New England – Ecohealth Website for Coffs Coastal Catchments

 

This project will deliver a publically available website hosted by UNE that will provide current reporting of water quality and other Ecohealth monitoring variables in Coffs Harbour coastal catchments.  An access-controlled part of the website will give Council access to all Ecohealth data for easy interrogation and export.  The community-centred website will allow the community to see how water quality is tracking in their catchments, use digital media and interactive maps to explain key water quality issues in their catchments, and showcase Council's investment to improve water quality.  Citizen scientists will be able to establish their own sites and compare their water quality values to national and state guidelines.

 

Requested amount:                       $24,000

Panel recommended amount:      $20,000

 

 

 

9.    Envite – Boambee East/Toormina Koala Corridor Improvement

 

Envite has continued conservation efforts in Council parkland adjacent to Dunlop Drive, Armstrong Drive, Platts Close, Hogbin Drive and Lindsays Road totalling an area of approximately forty-one hectares.  The project proposed on this occasion will include the additional site of Linden Lagoon, working closely with a newly formed local Landcare group.  The Toormina-Boambee area has been identified as primary Koala Habitat in our LGA and a major link to existing Koala populations in Bongil-Bongil National Park.  However, weed species present a major threat to biodiversity within Council managed lands and in some cases act as a barrier for Koala movement.  The community engagement aspect of this project will see local residents invited to participate in workshop/field day activities identifying potential threats to Koala habitat.

 

Requested amount:                       $24,966

Panel recommended amount:      $20,000

 

10.  Envite – Upper Bonville Riparian Restoration Action Stage 2

 

Following the success of Stage 1 of the restoration of Upper Bonville Creek, this proposal seeks to expand the project to additional properties in the estuary catchment system tributaries in rural residential areas in the south of our LGA. Stage 1 landholders have actively participated to improve the riparian condition with assistance from professional bush regenerators, continued assistance will ensure the secondary follow up works are maintained.  Revegetation of 600 trees will be undertaken, sourced from landholders as in-kind. Planting will contribute to stable stream banks, erosion reduction, improved water quality and health and connectivity of riparian corridors.

 

Requested amount:                       $24,985

Panel recommended amount:      $20,000

 

11.  Envite – Coffs Harbour Native Seedbank Network

 

The continuation and expansion of this project will allow for a dedicated service to collect, store and distribute seed to the community.  This local seed will be collected in the wild (in situ) and then stored and made available to propagators to germinate for community revegetation projects, including Eucalyptus seed and other orthodox native seeds species.  Orthodox seeds can be dried to low moisture content without loss of viability and kept at low temperatures without damage for five to twenty-five years.  Native trees targeted for seed collection predominantly for community revegetation projects including core koala food and habitat trees, flying fox habitat rehabilitation project, Orara River Rehabilitation project and fire affected landscapes.  All collections will be endemic to the Coffs Harbour LGA.

 

Requested amount:                       $16,012

Panel recommended amount:      $16,012

 

12.  Jaliigirr Biodiversity Alliance – Surveying Platypus Populations in the Orara Valley Using eDNA Technology

 

This project will utilise innovative science and citizen scientists to investigate and quantify the impacts of bushfires and other threatening processes on platypus populations in the Orara Valley.  Using baseline pre-fire data, approximately thirty sites will be selected across both fire-impacts and control areas of similar habitat.  Local citizen scientists will be engaged and trained in correct water sampling methodology and provided with sampling kits to collect samples from designated sites and return for lab analysis.  The changes in site occupancy in fire-affected compared to control areas will allow the group to quantify impacts and understand the conservation status of populations throughout the region.

 

Requested amount:                       $25,000

Panel recommended amount:      $20,000

 

13.  Jaliigirr Biodiversity Alliance – Canine Scent Detectives Promoting Koala Population Health in Jaliigirr Corridors – Stage 2

 

The project aims to build on the 2020-21 project, which surveyed koala activity and collected fresh koala scats for future genetic analysis in the Sawtell-Toormina-Boambee area.  The project will undertake a detailed survey of koala activity in an area known to support an important but fragmented koala population.  This project will undertake genetic processing of collected scat material to determine the number of scats with suitable DNA quality.  The individual DNA profiling and population analysis can be used to determine the comparative health and genetic diversity of the peri-urban populations and whether there is genetic flow through these linkages.  The information collected will assist Council to better identify and manage this population and the corridors that link them.

 

Requested amount:                       $25,000

Panel recommended amount:      $20,000

 

14.  Sandy Beach Action Group – Revegetation of Sandy Beach Reserve Stage 4

 

This project is a continuation of works to spray and revegetate an 800 square metre section of the Sandy Beach Reserve from the east side of the shared path to the fence.  Considerable work has already been undertaken by the Sandy Beach community following receipt of previous Environmental Levy Grants.  The project will involve the engagement of the community to revegetate the site with tube stock plants and spread mulch and the engagement of a contractor for the spraying of weeds.

 

Requested amount:                       $7,000

Panel recommended amount:      $7,000

 

15.  Southern Cross University – Catchment Scale Dissolved Metals Export into Coffs Coast Estuaries

 

In this project, the University will investigate dissolved metal loads in multiple creeks from Pine Creek in the south to Upper Corindi Creek in the north, expanding on previous site specific investigations.  The sites chosen will have a range of dominant land uses including forest, urban and horticulture.  It is likely that sites with more upstream intensive horticulture will have higher levels of dissolved metals.  The objective of this work is to identify and quantify dissolved metals exports into a habitat protected estuary in Coffs Coast Region over varying hydrological regimes.  The results of the study will then be used to provide science-based recommendations for the management of multiple dissolved metals sources related to different land-uses.

 

Requested amount:                       $25,000

Panel recommended amount:      $25,000

 

16.  Southern Cross University – Further Investigating Trace Metal Pollution in Sandy Beach

 

Recent studies found significant metals concentrations in groundwater and treated sewage used for irrigation in Sandy Beach.  This project will analyse dissolved isotopes and biological tissue for metals concentrations which will add understanding to the fates of metals after introduction to the catchment surface waters.  Outcomes of this research may reveal if aquatic organisms in receiving waters downstream are at hazard to human consumers and pathways of metal transport from introduction to downstream export.

 

Requested amount:                       $25,000

Panel recommended amount:      $25,000

 

17.  Southern Cross University – Valuation of Water Quality Regulation Services by Shellfish in Woolgoolga Lake

 

Coastal lakes and estuaries are a major repository for nutrient laden run-off, this can lead to poor water quality and a variety of associated environmental problems.  However, shellfish reefs in healthy estuaries can buffer the effect by removing dissolved nutrients, bacteria and reducing algal blooms through their suspension feeding activities.  Woolgoolga Lake contains a remnant population of large leaf oysters and Sydney Rock oysters, which have significant filter feeding capacity.  This project aims to quantify nutrient reduction by shellfish at a local scale and use this to value the water quality improvement services provided by the current shellfish population, then predict the benefits of shellfish reef restoration for maintaining healthy coastal ecosystems into the future.

 

Requested amount:                       $25,000

Panel recommended amount:      $20,000

 

18.  Woolgoolga Lake Working Group – Caring for Our Waterways – Stage 2

 

This project will partner with Council laboratories to collect appropriate beach water samples across the local government area to reinvigorate best practice beach and waterway testing and information dissemination and report to the State-wide Beachwatch Program.  The process will include the identification of priority areas through a whole of ecosystem approach, with a focus on identifying invertebrates, bi-valves, and fish populations in the Woolgoolga Lake catchment.  As a continuation of the current program, this project will increase monthly water testing to six sites and collaborate with Woolgoolga High School teachers and students to consolidate student learning and engagement.

 

Requested amount:                       $24,659

Panel recommended amount:      $18,442

 

19.  Coffs Harbour Regional Landcare – Keeping Coffs Harbour Cane Toad Free

 

Cane Toads have so far not established a breeding population in the Coffs Harbour area, however the risk is very high as populations are established in the Clarence Valley and are moving south.  There is also a very high risk of Cane Toads being unknowingly transported into the region from the north.  The aim of this project is to reduce the risk of Cane Toad incursions into Coffs Harbour by raising community awareness of Cane Toads including accurate identification and the development of a coordinated rapid response protocol for locating and controlling all reported Cane Toad sightings.  This will include training and coordinating teams of volunteers on search methods, control and trapping techniques, who can then be mobilised quickly as Cane Toad incursions occur.

 

Requested amount:                       $17,749

Panel recommended amount:      $Nil

 

This project received a lower score than other submissions during the panel’s review process and is not recommended to receive funding for this round.

Issues:

This is the final year for Council’s current (extended) Delivery Program.

Options:

The options available to Council in relation to the recommended projects for the 2021/22 Environmental Levy Grants Program are:

 

1.    Adopt the recommendation provided to Council by the Environmental Levy Grants Program Panel.  Adopting the recommendation will result in the projects scored by the Panel based on Environmental Levy Grants Program assessment criteria and ranked according to average scores being allocated funding.

2.    Council may amend the recommended projects, which may result in Council selecting or rejecting projects not consistent with the merit based assessment of the panel.

Option 1 is recommended.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

The Environmental Levy (EL) Program funds a combination of major Council strategic projects and initiatives and community based projects, which collectively deliver on the environmental objectives in the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.  All recommended projects will result in beneficial outcomes for the environment of the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area (LGA) and some may have positive flow-on impacts outside the LGA.

•     Social

Determination of successful projects is based on assessment criteria which includes the following:

 

-     Generate a community benefit;

-     Be community based, and

-     Protect and/or rehabilitate the natural environment.

•     Civic Leadership

Council’s EL Program seeks to promote sound environmental practices and promotes leadership and involvement in key environmental issues, which aligns with MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan theme - A natural environment sustained for the future.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The EL Program is funded through a special rate. A 25% pool has been allocated for the Environmental Levy Grants Program.  The EL Program funds environmental projects that would not otherwise be undertaken within Council’s operational funding.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

It is budgeted that $1,564,595 will be available for the EL Program in 2021/22.  This includes income from the 2021/22 EL Special Rate and a contribution from the Water Fund of $100,000 towards the Orara River rehabilitation works and Environmental Health and Water Quality Research initiatives.  A 25% pool of $366,149 has been allocated for the Environmental Levy Grants Program in 2021/22.

 

All recommended projects are able to be funded.

Risk Analysis:

Each of the projects has individual risk profiles which will be considered by the project owners.

Consultation:

The Environmental Levy Grants Program panel which currently includes a Councillor as Chair, two community representatives, a Council staff member and an interagency member is an advisory panel of Council.  The panel met on 17 May 2021 to consider the submissions and to recommend the projects for the program.  The recommended program is included in this report.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The Environmental Levy Grants Program panel reviews all submissions before the program is finalised.  Assessment of submissions is undertaken in accordance with Council’s Environmental Levy Policy, which states that submissions are scored on the following criteria:

 

·     protect and/or rehabilitate the natural environment;

·     strategic integration;

·     generate a community benefit and be community-based;

·     provide potential to attract outside funding sources; and

·     improve aesthetic quality of our natural environment and / or raise community awareness or education.

 

To be eligible submissions must:

 

·     address one or more identified key strategies in the Council’s MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan (‘A natural environment sustained for the future’ theme); and

·     work on private land must prove a 'public benefit' rather than only benefiting an individual or group.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Successful applicants will be notified in writing in June after the 2021/22 Environmental Levy Grants Program is formally adopted by Council.

Conclusion:

This report provides Council with the recommended projects for the 2021/22 Environmental Levy Grants Program for consideration and approval.

 


BS21/32       Bank and Investment Balances for May 2021

Author:                        Section Leader Financial Planning

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

MyCoffs:                      D.2 We have effective use of public resources.

Attachments:              ATT1  BS21/32   Investment Performance Report for the Month Ended 31 May 2021  

 

Executive Summary

Council’s Bank Balances and Investments as at 31 May 2021 totalled $256,001,780.32.  Council receives independent advice and invests surplus funds in accordance with Council’s Investment Policy to maximise investment income and preserve capital to assist with funding requirements for projects listed under the Delivery Program and associated Operational Plans.

 

Recommendation:

That Council note the bank balances and investments totalling $256,001,780.32 (including from loans, Developer Contributions and other avenues that form the restricted accounts and are committed for future works) as at 31 May 2021.

 

Report

Description of Item:

A copy of the state of Bank Balances and Investments as at 31 May 2021 is attached.  Also included is a summary of Council’s Socially Responsible Investment Performance.  It should be noted that Council is required to account for investments in accordance with the Australian International Financial Reporting Standards.  Term deposits are shown at face value and all other investment balances at the end of each month reflect market value movements, which would be inclusive of accrued interest.

 

Interest when paid, say quarterly, would result in reductions in the market value of the investments.  The Investment Report reflects the above requirements and reflects the interest earned (or accrued) on each investment, based on the acquisition price.

 

The bank balances and investment total of $256,001,780.32 as at 31 May 2021 is allocated between Council’s external restrictions, internal restrictions and unrestricted funds.

 

The balance of Council’s cash, cash equivalents and investments as at 30 June 2020 was attributable to external restrictions, internal restrictions and unrestricted funds as follows:

 

Fund

$000

External Restrictions

127,904

Internal Restrictions

88,300

Unrestricted

9,024

Total

225,228

 

Final calculations to determine external and internal restrictions are carried out during End of Financial Year Financial Statement preparation.

 

External restrictions account for over 56% of the cash, cash equivalent and investments held by Council; comprising of Developer Contributions, unexpended grants, unexpended loans, Water fund reserves, Sewer fund reserves and the Domestic Waste Management reserve as reported in Council’s Annual Financial Statements.

 

The below graph provides a breakdown of the bank and investment balances by Fund as at 31 May 2021.

 

 

The following line graph shows the rolling trend of Council’s bank balance and investment totals for a period of 13 months to 31 May 2021.  Of particular note this month is the receipt of the initial $25 million airport lease premium.

 

 

 

 

Reports written by Laminar Group Pty Ltd (Council’s investment portfolio advisors), which examine economic and financial markets data for May 2021 are available in the Councillors’ Resource Centre.

Issues:

There are no issues associated with this report.

Options:

As this report is for noting only, an options analysis is not required.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Included in the monthly report is a summary of Council’s Socially Responsible Investment Performance (refer Attachment 1).

•     Social

There are no perceived current or future social impacts from the information contained in this report.

•     Civic Leadership

Council invests surplus funds to maximise investment income and preserve capital to assist with funding requirements for projects listed under the Delivery Program and associated Operational Plans.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Council’s investments are held according to the requirements stated within Council’s Investment Policy and the returns are acceptable in relation thereto.  In the long term, earnings from investments can vary due to economic conditions and financial markets.  Council constructs its investment portfolio with consideration of current conditions and to comply with the Office of Local Government Investment Policy Guidelines.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

As at 31 May 2021, it is noted that the total bank and investment balance was $256,001,780.32 comprising restricted and unrestricted General, Trust, Water and Sewer Funds’ cash and investments.

Risk Analysis:

The likelihood of risks associated with New South Wales Local Government’s investing funds is now remote due to the conservative nature of investments permitted under statutory requirements.  The risk of capital not being returned in relation to each individual investment Council owns is indicated in the attachment.  Council officers have considered the risk to its portfolio in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Council has portfolio policy limits and risk management related strategy that provide protection against exposure to investment related risks.  Council also has maximum holding limits based on credit quality and counterparty limits and there is not considered to be a significant increase in these risks at this point in time.

 

The main risks for Council’s investment portfolio are liquidity and credit risk, both of which are being managed under the advice of Laminar Group Pty Ltd. Liquidity risk is the risk that the Council is unable to redeem the investment at a fair price within a timely period and thereby incurs additional costs (or in the worst case is unable to execute its spending plans).  Credit risk is the risk of loss of principal stemming from a financial institutions failure to repay that principal when that principal is due.  Council is compensated for assuming credit risk by way of interest payments from the financial institutions issuing the investment security.

 

Credit risk is rated by various rating agencies.  Investment securities in Council’s current portfolio are rated by either Standard and Poors or Fitch, with the majority of the portfolio rated by Standard and Poors.  Standard and Poors credit ratings and an explanation of their ratings are as follows:

 

Rating

Ratings Explanation

AAA

Extremely strong capacity to meet financial commitments.  Highest Rating.

AA

Very strong capacity to meet financial commitments.

A

Strong capacity to meet financial commitments, but somewhat susceptible to adverse economic conditions and changes in circumstances.

BBB

Adequate capacity to meet financial commitments, but more subject to adverse economic conditions.

BBB-

Considered lowest investment grade by market participants.

BB+

Considered highest speculative grade by market participants.

BB

Less vulnerable in the near term but faces major ongoing uncertainties to adverse business, financial and economic conditions.

B

More vulnerable to adverse business, financial and economic conditions but currently has the capacity to meet financial commitments.

CCC

Currently vulnerable and dependent on favourable business, financial and economic conditions to meet financial commitments.

CC

Currently highly vulnerable.

C

Currently highly vulnerable obligations and other defined circumstances.

D

Payment default on financial commitments.

 

Ratings from ‘AA’ to ‘CCC’ may be modified by the addition of a plus (+) or minus (-) sign to show relative standing within the major rating categories.

 

Types of investment securities by credit risk ranking from highest to lowest are as follows:

 

·     Deposits/Covered Bonds – these share first ranking

·     Senior debt – Floating Rate Notes/Fixed Coupon Bonds.

·     Subordinated debt

·     Hybrids

·     Preference shares

·     Equity shares (common shares).

 

Subordinated debt, hybrids, preference and equity shares are not a permitted investment under the current Ministerial Order.  Term deposits of $250,000 or less per financial institution are covered under the Commonwealth Government Deposit Guarantee Scheme and therefore by default have the same credit rating as the Commonwealth Government, i.e. AAA.

 

All credit unions, building societies and mutual banks are Authorised Deposit-taking Institutions (ADIs) and are regulated in the same way as all other Australian banks.  ADIs are regulated by the Australian Securities and Investment Commission under the Corporations Act 2001, and by the Australian Prudential Regulatory Authority under the Banking Act 1959.

Consultation:

Council’s investment advisors, Laminar Group Pty Ltd have been consulted in the preparation of this report.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Council funds have been invested in accordance with Council’s Investment Policy (POL‑049), which was adopted on 24 August 2017.

Local Government Act 1993 – Section 625.

Local Government Act 1993 – Investment Order (dated 12 January 2011).

Local Government General Regulation 2005.

The Trustee Amendment (Discretionary Investments) Act 1997 – Sections 14A(2), 14C(1) and 14C(2).

Implementation Date / Priority:

Nil.

Conclusion:

Council should consider the information provided in the report and the Councillors’ Resource Centre and the recommendation provided.

 

 

 


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BS21/33       Sale of Land - Writing off of Rates

Author:                        Team Leader Revenue

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

MyCoffs:                      D.2 We have effective use of public resources.

Attachments:              ATT1  BS21/33   CONFIDENTIAL Sale of Land - Writing off of Rates

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(b) of the Local Government Act as it contains discussion in relation to the personal hardship of a resident or ratepayer.  

 

Executive Summary

Within the Coffs Harbour LGA there are 14 properties that were small parcels of closed roads that had over 10 years of outstanding rates and charges in the amount of $133,957.11 as at August 2019.

 

In accordance with Council’s resolution these properties were auctioned in June 2020.  Of the 14 properties, one settled prior to auction, 11 settled in June 2020, one in late September and one passed in at auction.

 

Council’s approval is requested to abandon $57,483.93, the amount of rate balances outstanding, where the sale proceeds were insufficient to satisfy all outstanding rates and charges incurred in connection with the sale of land for unpaid rates and charges under Sections 718 and 719 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Recommendation:

That Council approves writing off the amount of $57,483.93 for rates and charges balances that remain outstanding after completion of the sale of land process of 14 properties auctioned in June 2020.

 

Report

Description of Item:

At its meeting held on 13 June 2019, Council considered a report and resolved (Resolution No. 2019/89) to commence sale of land proceedings to recover unpaid rates and charges on 14 properties.  Following further unsuccessful attempts to contact the property owners to recover the outstanding rates, at a subsequent meeting held on 22 August 2019, Council resolved (Resolution No. 2019/131) to sell the properties for unpaid rates by public auction.

 

Under Section 718 of the Local Government Act 1993 (the Act):

 

The council must apply any purchase money received by in on the sale of land for unpaid rates and charges in or towards payment of the following purposes and in the following order –

(a)    Firstly, the expense of the council incurred in connection with the sale,

 

(b)    Secondly, any rate or charge in respect of the land due to the council, or any other rating authority, and any debt in respect of the land (being a debt of which the council has notice) due to the Crown as a consequence of the sale on an equal footing.

 

At the conclusion of the public auction, and once settlement of purchased properties occurred, sale proceeds were applied to the expenses incurred by Council in connection with the land sale, which included advertising, real estate agent fees and legal expenses.  The remaining funds were then allocated to the overdue rates and charges associated with the property sold.

 

Any surplus funds are required to be returned to the ratepayer.  If the ratepayer cannot be located, the surplus funds will be sent to the Office of State Revenue as unclaimed monies.  Any property debts remaining can be written off through a resolution of Council.

Issues:

The properties detailed in Confidential Attachment 1 have sold for less than the rates, charges and debts incurred in connection to the land sale and as a result.

 

However, Section 719 of the Act states:

 

If the purchase money is insufficient to satisfy all rates, charges and debts referred to in section 718(b) –

(a)   the amount available is to be divided between the rates, charges and debts in proportion to the amounts owing on each, and

 

(b)   the rates, charges and debts are taken to have been fully satisfied.

 

As there is no further debt recovery action available, Council staff seek approval to write off the outstanding rates and charges balances.

Options:

The only viable option available to Council is to adopt the recommendation in accordance with Section 719(b) of the Act.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental impacts from this report.

•     Social

In undertaking the sale of land process, Council staff ensured that all effected residents, including adjoining owners, were treated fairly.

•     Civic Leadership

Rates and charges are an essential component of Council’s revenue which fund works and services aimed at achieving the objectives of the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Overdue outstanding rates and charges reduce cash flow for Council.  The settlement of the unpaid rates, through sale of the property at public auction, allowed Council to recover the outstanding debt.  The sold land parcels now become properties where rate revenue will be recoverable in future, thereby contributing to the funding of Council’s service delivery to the community.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

There are no significant current Delivery Program or Operational Plan implications.

Risk Analysis:

There are no risks in writing off the remaining outstanding balances in accordance with the Act.

Consultation:

No consultation is required as writing off the remaining outstanding balances is an administrative process under the Act.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

-     Debt Recovery Policy

-     Sale of Land to Recover Unpaid Rates and Charges Policy

-     Local Government Act 1993

Implementation Date / Priority:

The write off of the outstanding rates and charges will occur by 30 June 2021.

Conclusion:

This report seeks Council approval for the outstanding rates and charges not recoverable from the sale of land process to be written off in the 2020/21 financial year.

 

 


SC21/31       Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program - Post Exhibition

Author:                        Coast and Environment Officer

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      C.2 A natural environment sustained for the future

Attachments:              ATT1  SC21/31   Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program

ATT2  SC21/31   CONFIDENTIAL Submissions

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(e) of the Local Government Act as it contains information that would, if disclosed, prejudice the maintenance of law.  

 

Executive Summary

The objective of this report is to seek Council’s adoption of the Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program (Attachment 1) and to write to the Minister for Local Government seeking certification under the Coastal Management Act 2016.

The Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program has been prepared under the Coastal Management Act 2016, with the primary purpose being to set out the long-term strategy for the coordinated management of land within the coastal zone in order to meet local needs.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Adopt the Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program (Attachment 1).

2.       Submit the Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program to the Minister for Local Government seeking certification under the Coastal Management Act 2016.

3.       Inform those whom made a submission of Council’s decision.

 

Report

Description of Item:

At the Ordinary Meeting of 14 March 2019, it was resolved that Council:

1.   Endorse the draft Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program (Attachment 1) and place it on exhibition for a period of at least 28 days seeking feedback to enable Council’s final determination on this matter.

2.   Note that a further report will be brought back to Council for consideration following the public exhibition of the draft Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program.

The purpose of this report is to bring the final Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program (CMP) back to Council as per item two and seek Council’s adoption, and endorsement to seek certification under the Coastal Management Act 2016.

The Bonville and Pine Creek CMP has been developed in accordance with the NSW Coastal Management Act 2016 and the NSW Coastal Management Manual.

Council received grant funding though the NSW Government's Coastal and Estuary Grants Program to prepare the Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program which was matched with funds from Council.

The Bonville and Pine Creek CMP considers all four coastal management areas as described in the Coastal Management Act 2016: coastal wetlands and littoral rainforests, coastal vulnerability areas, coastal environment areas, and coastal use areas.

Throughout the development of the CMP, community and stakeholder consultation has been undertaken to identify the values and significance of the estuary to the community, and their desired outcomes for ongoing management. The CMP summarises the management issues and risks, and presents a series of management actions to mitigate these risks.

Thirty-one management options were identified, assessed, and ranked in accordance with the outcomes of a multi-criteria analysis of the feasibility and viability of each option. The top twelve options were then developed into detailed management actions for implementation.

A summary of the top twelve actions is as follows:

-     Estuary Entrance Behaviour Investigation

-     Implementation of DCP

-     Community Education Program

-     Community Conservation and Restoration Programs

-     Review LEP and DCP with respect to Intensive Agriculture / Horticulture

-     Coastal Inundation Monitoring

-     Climate Change Adaptation Plan

-     Bank Stability Projects

-     Condition Assessment of Coastal Protection Works

-     EcoHealth Monitoring Program

-     Stormwater Management Assets

-     Environmental Protection Works

There has been a delay in reporting the final document back to Council due the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment introducing new CMP stage 1 scoping study requirements and a new CMP assessment tool. The changes to the CMP assessment framework required some updates to components of the CMP structure and required re-engagement of consultants to undertake the work.

While there have been some changes to stage 1 of the CMP and updates to the overall document structure, the intent of the document and management actions are largely unchanged. Based on this, the CMP was not re-exhibited, however key stakeholders and relevant government agencies were invited to re-review the document prior to finalisation.

Issues:

The key issues identified for the estuary were:

-     land use changes;

-     vegetation clearing;

-     a potential decline of fish populations due to overfishing;

-     lack of knowledge on fish population leading to unrecorded decline in stocks;

-     sea level rise;

-     increased storm intensity and frequency; and

-     increased population leading to increased impacts.

Once implemented, the developed management actions seek to address these issues.

Options:

1.   Adopt the recommendation in this report and adopt the Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program (CMP) and pursue certification.

2.   Amend the recommendation in this report, noting that this CMP has been through a significant consultative process with government agencies, stakeholders and the community, and has been prepared through a detailed staged process adhering to the NSW Coastal Management Framework.

3.   Reject the recommendation.

This report recommends Option 1.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

The Bonville and Pine Creek estuary provides diverse habitat including rocky intertidal shores, sandflats, mangroves, saltmarsh, seagrass and riparian vegetation. Eight endangered ecological communities are present within the study area that provide vital wildlife corridors and habitat for threatened and migratory species. The CMP seeks to protect these ecological values.

•     Social

The Bonville and Pine Creek estuary is a valuable part of the landscape for the local community and provides many recreational opportunities.  The recreational and social values of the estuary came through strongly in the community survey which asked respondents to consider what features of the estuary were important. The CMP seeks to protect these social values.

•     Civic Leadership

Local Government, in partnership with other responsible agencies, has an essential role to play in managing the estuary. The CMP will guide all public authorities with respect to undertaking infrastructure, environmental rehabilitation and other works in the estuary.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Once the CMP is adopted and certified, Council will be able to seek funds from the NSW Government’s Coast and Estuary Grants Program for implementation at a two to one funding ratio.  The CMP actions have been through a multi-criteria analysis in order to rank the options which allows Council to prioritise works and allocate funding accordingly.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The CMP has been designed to feed into the Integrated Planning and Reporting (IP&R) Framework. The CMP identifies a Council funding requirement of $80,000 over three years.  This is currently unfunded.  The management actions proposed will be incorporated into Council’s IP&R framework including the operational plan and resourcing strategy.

Risk Analysis:

A detailed risk assessment for the estuary was conducted during the development of the CMP. Key threats identified as resulting in high risks include:

-     sea level rise;

-     increased storm intensity and frequency;

-     increased population leading to increased impacts;

-     vegetation clearing;

-     a potential decline in fish populations due to overfishing; and

-     lack of knowledge on fish population leading to unrecorded decline in stocks.

These threats encompass the key issues of development and human impacts, water quality, bank erosion, fishery impacts, aquatic habitats, and maintenance of the aesthetic attributes of the estuary. Once implemented, the developed management actions seek to address these risks.

Consultation:

The community has been provided with the opportunity to participate in the development of the CMP at a number of stages including two online surveys and one community workshop. Relevant agencies with responsibilities for implementing actions have also been consulted as has the Coffs Harbour Coast and Estuary Management Advisory Committee (CEMAC).

The CMP was publically exhibited from 27 March to 25 April 2019 and was advertised in local media, Councils Have Your Say Page and promoted on Council social media channels in accordance with Council’s Community Participation and Engagement Plan 2019, as follows:

Project Stage

Inform

Consult

Involve

Collaborate

Public Exhibition

x

x

 

 

Post Exhibition Report to Council

x

x

 

 

Post Endorsement Notification

x

 

 

 

At the conclusion of the public exhibition period, five Government agency submissions and zero public submissions were received by Council (Attachment 2). The submissions were analysed and the report modified as needed to address the issues.

Place Score:

In early 2019, Council undertook extensive community consultation using the Place Score place-making tool. This ‘place experience’ measurement tool enabled residents and visitors within the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area to share what they most value in their neighbourhood and then to rate how their neighbourhood is performing against such values. The 2019 Place Score report was presented to Council on 11 April 2019. The CMP will assist in managing what the community values in relation to the Bonville and Pine Creek area.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The Coastal Management Act 2016 provides the architecture for strategic management of coastal areas into the future and establishes requirements for the preparation of CMPs. Under the Coastal Management Act 2016, programs have a strong emphasis on implementation within the local government Integrated Planning and Reporting (IP&R) framework.

All public authorities are required to have regard to relevant CMPs when carrying out their functions (such as coastal planning, management) and when undertaking infrastructure and other works in coastal areas.

The Coastal Management Act 2016 makes reference to the State Environmental Planning Policy (Coastal Management) 2018 and Coastal Management Manual and requires that CMPs are prepared in accordance with the Manual. The Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program satisfies these requirements.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Implementation of this plan and access to grant funding can commence immediately after the CMP has been certified and published in the NSW Government Gazette.

Conclusion:

This report has provided Council with an overview of the Bonville and Pine Creek Coastal Management Program (Attachment 1) and seeks Council’s adoption and endorsement to pursue certification for the Program.

 


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SC21/32       Planning Proposal for an Additional Permitted Use (Storage and Hire of Shipping Containers) - Lot 13 DP 1109077, Hulberts Road Toormina - Version 1 Pre-Exhibition

Author:                        Planner / Urban Designer

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      B.1 A thriving and sustainable local economy

Attachments:              ATT1  SC21/32   Planning Proposal - Hulberts Road, Toormina - Version 1 Pre-Exhibition  

 

Executive Summary

A proponent-led application has been received by Council to amend Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 2013 for Lot 13 DP 1109077, Hulberts Road, Toormina to facilitate an additional permitted use on the land. The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement to initiate a planning proposal (Attachment 1) to amend Schedule 1 Additional Permitted Uses of Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 to allow the storage and hire of shipping containers to be permitted with development consent on the subject land.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Endorse and forward a planning proposal (Attachment 1) to amend Schedule 1 Additional Permitted Uses of Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 for Lot 13 DP 1109077, Hulberts Road, Toormina to the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment seeking determination pursuant to Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (Gateway Determination).

2.       Request that the Secretary of the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment issue written authorisation to Council to exercise delegation of the plan making functions under section 3.36(2) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 in respect of the planning proposal.

3.       Resolve to publicly exhibit the planning proposal and undertake government agency consultation based on the Gateway Determination issued by the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment.

4.       Note that a further report will be brought back to Council for consideration following public exhibition of the planning proposal.

5.       Inform the landowners of the subject land and their consultant of Council’s decision.

 

Report

Description of Item:

A proponent-led application has been received by Council to amend Schedule 1 Additional Permitted Uses of Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 for Lot 13 DP 1109077, Hulberts Road, Toormina to allow the storage and hire of shipping containers to be permitted with development consent on the subject land.

The application has merit, as the subject land is relatively unconstrained and Zone IN1 General Industrial is considered to be an appropriate location for such development. In this regard, a planning proposal has been prepared in accordance with Section 3.33 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (‘The Act’) to initiate an amendment to Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 (Attachment 1).

 

·        The Subject Land:

The application to amend Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 affects land at Hulberts Road (Lot 13 DP 1109077), Toormina (Figure 1).

Figure 1 – Subject Land

The subject land has an area of approximately 1.6 hectares and has been the subject of a number of approvals for industrial land uses over the past seventeen years. The land has been cleared and filled in accordance with Development Consent 0851/06DA for the construction of industrial units on the eastern portion of the site. The subject land is contained within Zone IN1 General Industrial under Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2: Land Use Zones – Coffs Harbour LEP 2013

Issues:

·        Additional Permitted Uses

Council is able to permit additional uses for specific sites within Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 (in addition to the land uses already identified in the land use table of the plan). Additional permitted uses are included in Schedule 1 of Coffs Harbour LEP 2013.

The NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment’s Draft LEP Practice Note on Schedule 1 Additional Permitted Uses states that Schedule 1 of an LEP should only be used in exceptional circumstances, where Council can demonstrate that there is no other acceptable solution to progress the matter.

The storage and hire of shipping containers does not meet any of the definitions for industrial land uses within the Standard Instrument – Principle LEP 2006. It is captured within the broad definition of a 'specialised retail premises’ (bulky goods), which is a prohibited land use in Zone IN1 General Industrial.

This issue was explored in developing the Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy 2020 – Chapter 8 Employment Lands. In this Chapter, it is recommended that specialised retail premises are limited within industrial areas, so as not to detract from commercial centres.

Specialised retail premises are permitted with development consent in Zone B2 Local Centre, B3 Commercial Core, B4 Mixed Use and B5 Business Development under Coffs Harbour LEP 2013. These zones are generally located in more visually prominent areas of the Coffs Harbour LGA and businesses within these commercial zones rely on visually presentable retail shop fronts to attract customers.

The proposal to utilise the subject land for the storage and hire of shipping containers is considered to be industrial in nature, particularly due to its visual representation, associated loading/unloading requirements and truck movements. The use is not deemed to be suitable for the commercial zones within the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area in which specialised retail premises are permitted with consent. It is for this reason that an ‘additional permitted use’ is recommended as the preferred solution and not the inclusion of specialised retail premises broadly within Zone IN1 General Industrial.

·        Amenity Impacts

Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy 2020 – Chapter 8 Employment Lands states that the ‘Hulberts Road Precinct’ has the potential to transition to Zone IN2 Light Industrial, due to its proximity to residential land and the dominance of lower-impact uses that would align with a light industrial zoning.

The subject land is within the ‘Hulberts Road Precinct’ and is considered to be suitable for the storage and hire of shipping containers due to the lands topography and surrounding vegetation/open space, which would minimise amenity impacts on nearby residential land uses.

Options:

Council has a number of options available in relation to this matter. They include:

1.   Resolve to adopt the recommendations of this report.

2.   Resolve to undertake an alternative approach.

Option 1 is recommended as the suitable course of action.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Environmental sustainability issues are summarised in the planning proposal (Attachment 1). Environmental sustainability issues are also required to be addressed as part of any future development application should the planning proposal be initiated.

•     Social

Social sustainability issues are addressed in the planning proposal (Attachment 1). The use of the subject land for the storage and hire of shipping containers is unlikely to result in any social impact, due to the lands topography and surrounding vegetation/open space, which would minimise amenity impacts on nearby residential land uses.

•     Civic Leadership

The planning proposal accords with relevant objectives and associated strategies of the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan, including B1.1 We champion business, events, innovation and technology to stimulate economic growth, investment and local jobs; and B1.2 We attract people to work, live and visit in the Coffs Harbour local government area.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The proposal will enable the establishment of a new business and thus will provide for local employment opportunities. The proposal will also provide for additional services and support for associated businesses (i.e. construction companies).

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The proposed amendment to Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 is a proponent-led application and therefore Council’s adopted fees and charges apply. In this regard, there are no implications for Council’s Delivery Program or Operational Plan as this process is funded by the applicant.

Risk Analysis:

The planning proposal (Attachment 1) addresses the constraints that affect the land, sufficient to allow Council to initiate the planning proposal to the next stage of the plan making process (Gateway Determination), which involves community and stakeholder consultation, thereby minimising risk to Council.

Consultation:

Should Council resolve to initiate the planning proposal and a Gateway Determination is subsequently issued by the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment, the proposal is required to be exhibited in accordance with the determination and relevant provisions of the Act. Consultation with government agencies and other stakeholders may also be required if specified within the determination. Consultation will be undertaken in accordance with Council’s Community Participation and Engagement Plan 2019, as follows:

Project Stage

Inform

Consult

Involve

Collaborate

Pre-lodgement Discussions

x

x

x

 

Initiate Planning Proposal

x

x

 

 

Public Exhibition

x

x

 

 

Post Exhibition Report to Council

x

x

 

 

Post Endorsement Notification

x

 

 

 

Place Score:

In early 2019, Council undertook extensive community consultation using the Place Score place-making tool. This ‘place experience’ measurement tool enabled residents and visitors within the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area to share what they most value in their neighbourhood and then to rate how their neighbourhood is performing against such values. The 2019 Place Score report was presented to Council on 11 April 2019.

Toormina received a Place Score of 58, which is below the NSW average of 72 for liveability. The Toormina community nominated ‘elements of natural environment’ as being the community’s most important attribute. This includes natural features, views, vegetation, topography, water and wildlife etc. The proposed amendment to Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 will provide a mechanism to allow a relatively low impact, light industrial land use that will interface with surrounding open space, hence protecting such highly valued attributes.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

This planning proposal has been prepared in accordance with the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Regulation 2000. A number of other relevant policies and statutory documents have also been considered in the preparation of the planning proposal.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Should Council resolve to initiate the planning proposal, Gateway Determination will subsequently be sought from the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment to enable the proposed LEP amendment to proceed to the next stage of the plan making process. The timeframe for the completion of this planning proposal is governed by the Act and thus is determined by the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment.

Conclusion:

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement to initiate a planning proposal (Attachment 1) to amend Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 to facilitate an additional permitted use (storage and hire of shipping containers) on Lot 13 DP 1109077, Hulberts Road, Toormina.

The proposed amendment to Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 has planning merit, as the subject land is relatively unconstrained and is located within an industrial zone, which is considered to be appropriate for such land use. The proposal accords with the North Coast Regional Plan 2036 and Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy 2020.

 


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SC21/33       Development Application No. 0712/20 - Service Station And Takeaway Food And Drink Premises, Including Demolition of Existing Structures - Lot 1 DP 521554, 19-25 Clarence Street, Woolgoolga

Author:                        Development Assessment Officer

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      B.2 A community achieving its potential

Attachments:              ATT1  SC21/33   Development Application No. 0712/20 - 4.15 Evaluation

ATT2  SC21/33   Development Application No. 0712/20 - Plans

ATT3  SC21/33   Development Application No. 0712/20 - Draft Conditions

ATT4  SC21/33   CONFIDENTIAL Development Application No. 0712/20 - Submissions

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(e) of the Local Government Act as it contains information that would, if disclosed, prejudice the maintenance of law.  

        

 

 

Executive Summary

This report provides an assessment of Development Application No. 0712/20 for a service station and takeaway food and drink premises, including demolition of existing structures at Lot 1 DP 521554, 19-25 Clarence Street, Woolgoolga.

At its meeting of 12 October 2017, Council adopted the ‘Development Applications - Consideration by Council Policy’, which outlined:

That development applications for approval involving substantial aspects of the following elements be referred to Council for determination:

-     Significant public interest and community input;

-     A proposed variation to the Local Environmental Plan that varies from the development standard by more than 10%;

-     Significant land use; and

-     Major environmental issues.

Following public exhibition of the application, Council received 136 submissions. Three of the submissions were in support of the proposal with the remainder of the submissions objecting to the proposal.  Accordingly, this matter is reported to Council for determination due to 'significant public interest and community input’.

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Approve Development Application No. 0712/20 for a service station and takeaway food and drink premises, including demolition of existing structures at Lot 1 DP 521554, 19-25 Clarence Street, Woolgoolga subject to the conditions in Attachment 3.

2.       Advise persons who made a submission on Development Application No. 0712/20 of Council’s decision.

 

REPORT:

Applicant:

BTC Properties Unit Trust

Landowner:

G & K Sidhu Pty Limited

Land:

Lot 1 DP 521554, 19-25 Clarence Street, Woolgoolga.

Zone:

B4 Mixed Use Zone

Description:

Service station and takeaway food and drink premises, including demolition of existing structures

Description of Item:

•     The Site

The site is legally described as Lot 1 DP 521554.  The street address is 19-25 Clarence Street, Woolgoolga. The site is located on the southern side of Clarence Street and the eastern side of Solitary Islands Way.

The site is irregular in shape, 5,798 square metres in area and currently developed as a motel (Pine Lodge Motel) with associated car parking.

A number of residential and commercial premises surround the site. The site is an area that has mixed uses.  Residential properties are located on the northern side of Clarence Street which is currently zoned R1 – General Residential.  Residential premises also exist on the southern side of Clarence Street (adjoining the subject site) which are currently zoned B4 – Mixed Use. Commercial properties exist to the east of the site along River Street comprising shops and a hotel (Sea View Tavern) which are also zoned B4 – Mixed Use.

•     The Development

The application seeks approval to construct a service station and takeaway food and drink premises, including demolition of existing structures. 

The proposed hours of operation are 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The proposal includes the following details:

-     Demolition of all existing structures on the site.

-     Erection of one petrol fuel canopy, comprising fuel bowsers.

-     Construction of a convenience store and refuse room, ancillary to the service station.

-     Construction of a take away food and drink premises at the north-eastern part of the site. The proposed take away food and drink premises consists of a restaurant and drive-through.

-     Excavation to accommodate the proposed buildings and underground fuel tanks and bunding.

-     Associated landscaping works.

-     Upgrade to Solitary Islands Way to provide for a deceleration lane for access into the site.

-     Construction of driveways, hardstand areas and at grade parking for car parking spaces.

-     Installation of pylon signs for business identification purposes.

Issues:

The main assessment issues for the proposed development are:

-     Traffic

-     Amenity impacts (visual, noise, odour)

-     Stormwater management

These issues are detailed in the Section 4.15 Evaluation Report as Attachment 1 to this report.

Options:

1.   Adopt the recommendation thereby granting approval to the application, subject to conditions.

2.   Refuse the application and list reasons for refusal.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

A complete assessment of potential environmental impacts is provided in the Section 4.15 Evaluation Report as Attachment 1 to this report.

•     Social

A complete assessment of potential social impacts is provided in the Section 4.15 Evaluation Report as Attachment 1 to this report.

•     Civic Leadership

The proposed development is considered to be consistent with the ‘MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan’ particularly the ‘A Place for Community’ theme, which requires amongst other things that development occur in a way that is environmentally, socially and economically responsible.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The proposed development is not expected to result in any significant broader economic implications.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

There are no implications for Council’s Delivery Program/adopted Operational Plan.

Risk Analysis:

A risk analysis has been undertaken and it is considered that approval of the development application as recommended, does not pose a significant risk to Council.

Consultation:

The development was advertised and notified in accordance with the requirements of the Coffs Harbour Community Participation and Engagement Plan between 13 May and 12 June 2020 and 136 submissions were received. Three of the submissions were in support of the proposal with the remainder of the submissions objecting to the proposal.

A full copy of all of the submissions is a confidential attachment to this report (Attachment 4) as the submissions may contain personal or private information or other considerations against disclosure as prescribed under the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The statutory instruments relevant to the development include the following:

-    Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2013

-    Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan 2015

-     State Environmental Planning Policy No 55 - Remediation of Land

-     State Environmental Planning Policy No. 33 – Hazardous and Offensive Development;

-     State Environmental Planning Policy No 64 - Advertising and Signage

-     State Environmental Planning Policy (Infrastructure) 2007;

-     State Environmental Planning Policy (Coastal Management) 2018

Implementation Date / Priority:

In the event that Council adopts the recommendation, a formal notice of determination will be issued for the development application. A formal notice of determination is valid for five years and the applicant can act on the development consent at any time within that period, subject to meeting any relevant conditions of the consent.

Conclusion:

A comprehensive assessment of the application has been undertaken in accordance with all statutory requirements and it is recommended that the application be approved subject to a number of standard conditions (Attachment 3).

 

 


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SC21/34       Draft Jetty Memorial Theatre Strategic Plan - Pre-Exhibition

Author:                        Section Leader Community Programs

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      A.1 A vibrant and inclusive place

Attachments:              ATT1  SC21/34   Draft Jetty Memorial Theatre Strategic Plan 2022-2026  

 

Executive Summary

The Jetty Memorial Theatre is a key cultural facility of Coffs Harbour City Council, delivering three core services; a central venue for the delivery of performing arts in the region, delivery of local community and commercial touring performances, and provision of an annual season program.

The Draft Jetty Memorial Theatre (JMT) Strategic Plan 2022-2026 has been developed to outline the strategic direction and guide ongoing operations for the theatre over the next five years with an aim to meet community and audience expectations, guide the theatre’s business plan and provide a blueprint for continued sustainability.

The plan includes goals, prioritised actions and activities for service enhancements and capital improvements in order to meet anticipated increasing service requirements, industry trends, all with the aim to deliver on the JMT’s vision and mission.

The purpose of this report is to seek Council approval to place the Draft JMT Strategic Plan 2022-2026 on public exhibition for a period of 28 days for broader community consultation.

 

Recommendation:

That Council place the Draft Jetty Memorial Theatre Strategic Plan 2022-2026 (Attachment 1) on public exhibition for a minimum period of 28 days.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Council’s Jetty Memorial Theatre (JMT) is located at 337 Harbour Drive, Coffs Harbour and currently provides an intimate 255 seat performing arts facility. The JMT was originally built in 1928 and has subsequently undergone numerous alterations and expansions and uses over time.

The JMT’s previous and first strategic plan was adopted by Council in December 2012.  This previous plan had the objective of finding a common ground to uniting all stakeholders. Over the past eight years, there have been significant improvements in the relationship between the community based users of the theatre and its management, and a stabilisation of its operations.

More recently, the Issues and Options Paper for Performing Arts Spaces (Indoor and Outdoor) adopted by Council in September 2020, provided a number of recommendations including to undertake a strategic plan update of the JMT.

Hawkridge Entertainment Services were engaged to update the JMT Strategic Plan. The Draft Plan (Attachment 1) was developed through consultation with key stakeholders, analysis of past financial and attendance records, review of external data to identify trends and patterns, and an analysis of an online survey. It aims to provide:

-     Clear direction for staff and the community on the JMT strategic priorities;

-     The actions and activities required to achieve stated goals;

-     The basis for resource planning and funding applications; and

-     Alignment with Council’s related plans and strategies.

The core offering for the JMT is a yearly program of performances/shows that is selected and programmed by JMT leadership. It is one of the only venues in Coffs Harbour to offer a regular series of performing arts-based shows/performances and the only to be professionally programmed. The JMT also offers a regular series of movie screenings, community arts organisations performances/shows and some commercial hiring.  In addition to the fees charged for hiring the venue, the JMT generates revenue through the activities in the theatre including offering a bar/kiosk, ticketing, marketing and technical service.

These activities contribute to Council’s overall commitment in providing performing arts services to the community. Maintaining the theatre, thereby enabling both community and commercial touring performances and provision of an annual season program, are important outcomes for the community.  This promotes both local and visitor connection, experience and appreciation for the performing arts industry, and a key attraction and contributor to the local cultural and tourism economies.

The existing services are well regarded and the venue is well supported by the local community. A recent survey of patrons showed that over 90% of patrons agreed with the statement that the JMT makes a contribution to their life that went beyond the cost of a ticket.

The Draft Jetty Memorial Theatre Strategic Plan 2022-2026 is recommended to Council for public exhibition to allow for broader community consultation.

Issues:

The Draft JMT Strategic Plan aligns with and builds upon key plans and reports adopted by Council, namely the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan (2017), Creative Coffs Cultural Strategic Plan 2017-2022, and the recent Issues and Options Paper for Performing Arts Spaces (Indoor and Outdoor) (2020), and aims to ensure that the theatre’s ongoing operations meet community and audience expectations, guide the theatre’s business plan and provide a blueprint for continued sustainability.

The key objectives of the Draft JMT Strategic Plan are to:

1.    Increase the overall utilisation of the JMT.

2.    Increase the attendance at all events, activities and performances.

3.    Increase the revenue from services offered including technical, ticketing and bar/kiosk.

The Draft JMT Strategic Plan acknowledges the vast improvement in the relationship between the community-based users of the theatre and its management and a stabilisation of its operation to provide a sound basis on which to develop this plan.  However, the recent impact from COVID restrictions including limitation of seating capacity, cancellation and postponing of local and touring performances has had a dramatic impact on revenue opportunity. As at the 29 March 2021, COVID restrictions in NSW were reduced enabling the theatre to operate at 100% capacity.

Council has also proposed an expansion of the JMT to provide a new rehearsal/community space, workshop plus set assembly area for the building of theatrical sets. The expansion project will also address current operational shortfalls by providing an expanded kiosk and foyer, additional toilet and shower amenities, and some additional car parking. The project has been endorsed by Council to be made shovel-ready for future external funding opportunities. The project cost is estimated at $4.2M and the development consent, cost plan and heritage assessment have all been completed.  However, the project is currently not funded. The strategic plan explores the opportunities of an expanded JMT and makes recommendations moving forward, should this project be realised in the future.

The Draft Plan proposes the following Vision, Mission and Values for the JMT:

-     Vision: The Jetty Memorial Theatre is the number one source of entertainment in Coffs Harbour delivering something for everyone.

-     Mission: We provide our audiences, performers, volunteers and staff the best experience by engaging, listening and producing quality entertainment for all.

-     Values: We have a passion for the performing arts; We respect all people; We engage our audience; We collaborate and partner; We are sustainable and We provide leadership.

Further direction is provided within the Draft Plan via the goals listed below:

1.       Engage the community in meaningful experiences through curatorial and programming choices.

2.       Build and strengthen community relationships and support efforts to increase the capacity and growth of cultural resources within the City.

3.       Develop diverse revenue streams.

4.       Sustain and strengthen the organisational capacity, human resources and infrastructure of the JMT.

5.       Strengthen internal and external communication.

6.       The expansion upgrade of the JMT will be completed and embraced by all.

Options:

There are two options open to Council outlined below, with Option 1 forming the basis of the recommendation to Council.

Option 1:    Adopt the recommendation of this report and approve the public exhibition of the Draft
Jetty Memorial Theatre Strategic Plan 2022-2026.

Option 2:    Amend the recommendation.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Public exhibition of the Draft JMT Strategic Plan has no identified adverse environmental impact.

•     Social

The Draft JMT Strategic Plan recognises the significant social and cultural value the Jetty Memorial Theatre holds for the local community and provides clear direction on management and development priorities over the next five years aimed at maximising community and the performing arts industry outcomes.

•     Civic Leadership

The Draft JMT Strategic Plan supports the following objectives within the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan:

-     We foster a sense of community, belonging, and diversity

-     We enrich cultural life through art, learning and cultural endeavour

-     We nurture mental health, wellbeing and social connection

-     We attract people to work, live and visit in the Coffs Harbour local government area

-     We undertake development that is environmentally, socially and economically responsible

-     We undertake effective engagement and are informed

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The Draft JMT Strategic Plan provides the basis to guide the operations of the theatre over coming years in a financially sustainable manner.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Public exhibition of the Draft JMT Strategic Plan has no immediate Delivery Program or Operational Plan implications.

The goals and actions identified in the Draft Plan have been developed with the assumption that no additional resourcing will be provided to deliver the actions.

The exception to this is the JMT Expansion project that, as noted previously, is subject to future funding.

Risk Analysis:

There are no perceived risks from the advancement of the Draft JMT Strategic Plan. The risks associated with not having a strategic plan in place are disorderly or inadequate service delivery, reduced accountability, uncertainty and discord within the community and reduced capacity to secure required operational and capital resources.

Consultation:

Consultation has been undertaken with staff, volunteers, the Jetty Memorial Theatre Section 355 Management Committee representatives, various stakeholders and a patron survey.

Submissions during the public exhibition period will be invited via Council’s Have Your Say page.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

-     Cultural Policy

-     Creative Coffs - Cultural Strategic Plan 2017-2022

-     Community & Cultural Facilities Plan 2021-2031

-     Performing Arts Spaces (Indoor and Outdoor) Issues and Options Paper (2020)

Implementation Date / Priority:

Public exhibition can commence following the Council resolution.

Conclusion:

This report recommends that Council places the Draft Jetty Memorial Theatre Strategic Plan 2022-2026 on public exhibition.

Council has invested resources in the Draft Plan prepared by Hawkridge Entertainment Services. It is considered that exhibition of the Draft Plan is the appropriate mechanism to provide an opportunity for input from the broader community.

Following the public exhibition period, consideration will be given to submissions received and a report will be prepared for Council to seek adoption of the Jetty Memorial Theatre Strategic Plan.

 


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SC21/35       Remote Rescue Tubes Project - Trial - Review Report

Author:                        Section Leader Community Programs

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      A.2 An active, safe and healthy community

Attachments:              ATT1  SC21/35   Remote Rescue Tube Trial - Review Report  

 

Executive Summary

Coffs Harbour City Council Lifeguard Service, in conjunction with volunteers from Surf Life Saving NSW, manage foreshore and beach activities for the enjoyment and protection of all throughout a number of patrolled beaches in the Coffs Harbour local government area.

However, not all beaches can be patrolled, nor are patrols available at all times of the day, or at all times of the year. Statistics also show that drowning incidents predominantly occur outside patrol times.

As a consequence, the adopted Coffs Harbour City Lifeguard Service Strategic Plan 2019-2024 identified the use of “Remote supervision, unmanned / self-service rescue tubes / equipment” as an opportunity to assist in addressing the risk of drowning incidents.

A successful Remote Rescue Tube Trial has now been conducted and a ’Review Report’ (Attachment 1) has been developed that documents the trial with suggested options to move to a full roll-out across the Coffs Harbour LGA.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.    Note the outcomes of the ‘Review Report’ (Attachment 1) relating to the Remote Rescue Tube Trial.

2.    Thank the Sawtell Surf Life Saving Club and community for their support through the trial period.

3.    Acknowledge the successful funding received by Rotary Club of Coffs Harbour relating to the roll-out of additional Remote Rescue Tubes.

4.    Endorse the roll-out of the Remote Rescue Tubes program over a maximum three-year period in conjunction with Coffs Coast Regional Park, Surf Life Saving Clubs, Rotary Clubs and others as required.

 

Report

Description of Item:

In December 2019, Council adopted the Coffs Harbour City Lifeguard Service Strategic Plan 2019–2024 which identified the following action - “Conduct remote rescue tube trial at Sawtell, undertake assessment of effectiveness for cost, and expand to other locations based on business case and funding availability”.

A trial of the remote rescue tubes was conducted over a five-month period, including the 2019/2020 surf season. The remote rescue tubes were installed between Boambee Headland and Southside, Sawtell and monitored by Council and project partner, Sawtell Surf Life Saving Club. Trial results were collected through online reporting forms and on-site observations from Council Lifeguards and Sawtell Surf Life Saving Club members.

The trial was evaluated through post-trial workshops, face-to-face interviews with key participants and a community survey with local and visitor beach users. A ‘Review Report” (Attachment 1) was prepared documenting these activities undertaken as part of the ‘Remote Rescue Tube Trial’. The ‘Review Report’ provides recommended directions for the future roll-out of remote rescue tubes throughout the Coffs Harbour LGA.

The ’Review Report’ identifies that the trial project resulted in high levels of community support and outlines the preferred option for consideration that involves a three year roll-out over the following phases:

Phase:

Year:

Outcome:

Est cost:

1

2021/22

Construct and install remote rescue tubes at 10 priority beach localities within the Coffs Harbour LGA (21 tubes installed)

$28,000

2

2022/23

Construct and install remote rescue tubes at a further 12 beach localities within the Coffs Harbour LGA (28 tubes installed)

$37,400

3

2023/24

Construct and install remote rescue tubes at the remaining 15 beach localities within the Coffs Harbour LGA  (27 tubes installed)

$36,000

The 10 priority beach localities currently identified for roll-out in Phase 1 are listed below:

1.   Corindi Beach (Darlington/Lorikeet)

2.   Emerald Beach

3.   Murrays Beach/Boambee Headland

4.   Fiddamans Beach

5.   Campbells Beach – (North) Riecks Point

6.   Diggers Beach

7.   Moonee Beach North (Shelleys)

8.   Red Rock

9.   Woolgoolga Beach

10. Moonee Beach South

Estimated cost per unit (rescue tube, device holder and installation) is approx. $880 (ex-GST). Other identified estimate project costs are $5,000 per year for communication (promotion and education) and $6,000 per year for ongoing maintenance and repair.

Issues:

The Coffs Harbour LGA covers a coastline area of 70km, including 33 beaches. Many of these beaches are recognised as some of the best in Australia and are a highly valued by visitors and the local community alike. The roll-out plan identifies and prioritises 37 beach localities, which accounts for access arrangements for some beaches, where the entire length of a beach has been split into different localities, such as Moonee Beach North (Shelleys) and Moonee Beach South.

The population of Coffs Harbour also continues to grow, resulting in increasing beach usage. In the past four years since July 2016, 11 people have drowned at beaches within the Coffs Harbour LGA, with none of these occurring between the flags at a patrolled beach.

These incidences highlight the importance of remote supervision opportunities such as the remote rescue tubes, which comprises of a lifeguard rescue tube device within a stainless steel device holder and wrapped in instructional information.  However, there are a number important matters that need to be closely considered prior to implementation including:

-     One approach for the Coffs Coast - A number of beaches and foreshores are also in the area that are not managed by Council.  A consistent approach to the availability of remote rescue tubes would be beneficial to public understanding and trust in the provision of the infrastructure. Consultation has commenced with other land managers to ensure that this can occur. 

-     Ongoing monitoring support - Agreement in principle for support of the program from local Surf Life Saving Clubs and other community organisations such as Rotary or Lions Clubs that are associated with the Rescue Tube Foundation internationally would be beneficial.  Whilst high levels of community support have been identified, there is a need to ensure that these relationships are formalised. Consultation has commenced with related organisations and this would continue should the roll-out be progressed. 

-     Commitment to communication and education - A dedicated communications strategy and associated feedback loops are required in the initial stages, followed by regular / annual education processes (including through school programs and the like).  Commitment is needed to this staged implementation period to ensure high levels of community knowledge and education are achieved.  

-     Funding for initial implementation and ongoing maintenance - Funding is required to meet the initial product purchase / construction, followed by installation.  This initial phase appears highly likely to be supported by grants and sponsor participation, though ongoing maintenance and replacement may then rest with Council.  An initial grant has been successfully accessed by the Rotary Club of Coffs Harbour, though further funding will need to be sought across the implementation period.

Rotary have advised that the federal grant they have received for this project is for infrastructure that is to be delivered within the Cowper electorate only. This will require review of the current roll-out schedule and is likely to see a number of Cowper beach localities within the Coffs Harbour LGA move forward into the Year 1 roll-out.

There is strong interest in this project in terms of external support and the project has large potential to attract significant input in terms of grants, donations and sponsorship. These opportunities will be further explored with key stakeholders, for arrangements to be formalised and for a funding strategy to be confirmed.

Options:

Two options have been identified and are outlined below:

1.    Adopt the recommendation in this report and endorse the proposed 3-year roll-out program.

2.    Resolve to not roll-out the Remote Rescue Tubes program and remove previously installed infrastructure.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

The environmental impact of installing remote rescue tubes on beaches within the Coffs Harbour LGA is deemed to be minimal, both now and into the future.

•     Social

The social impact of installing remote rescue tubes on beaches through the Coffs Harbour LGA is identified as a positive opportunity to both educate the beach-going public, and to potentially reduce the incidence of the drowning events and the damaging impacts that result.

•     Civic Leadership

Remote rescue tubes are not currently installed on beaches in nearby LGAs. Enquiries about the project from other nearby LGAs have been received. Coffs Harbour City Council is well place to provide leadership and information to other Councils about the remote rescue tube trial.

The remote rescue tube roll-out program would also support the following objectives within the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan:

-  We nurture mental health, wellbeing and social connection (A2.3)

-  We cultivate a safe community (A2.4)

-  We undertake effective engagement and are informed (D1.2)

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The City’s beaches are a key attractor for tourism and visitation. Ensuring safety of the public and ongoing confidence in undertaking beach activities is critical to long-term growth of tourism activity. Tourism is a key economic driver for the region.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The total funding requirements are estimated to be in order of $100,000 over a three-year period, this includes infrastructure, installation and communications, which would supply a total of 82 remote rescue tubes throughout the LGA (including six already installed). Ongoing funding for maintenance, repair and replacement is expected to be approximately $6,000 per annum.

It should be noted that $20,000 in funding has been secured in funding by the Rotary Club of Coffs Harbour for the initial rollout of tubes within the Cowper Electorate. This Rotary Club has also identified several businesses interested in sponsorship opportunities that can be explored.

It is highly anticipated that phase 1 will be able to be implemented through external funding and existing operational budgets.  The longer term funding requirements will be subject to ongoing evaluation of the roll out together with the availability of further external funding opportunities and future Council budgets.

Risk Analysis:

With the roll out of remote rescue tubes, there is the potential for an increase in attempted bystander rescues that would otherwise not be attempted. Alternatively, the risks associated with bystander rescues could likely be reduced due to the provision of remote rescue tubes.

Theft and vandalism of the remote rescue tubes are also identified as risks to the project. However, during the trial period, no incidence of theft or vandalism were recorded and with strong levels of community support, this risk is expected to be minor.

Consultation:

Consultation activities were carried out as part of the Remote Rescue Tube Trail including a post-trial workshop with relevant stakeholders, face to face interviews with key participants and community surveys with beach goers.  These consultation activities are documented in the ‘Review Report’ (Attachment 1).

Initial consultation has also been undertaken with Coffs Coast Regional Parks and the Rotary Club of Coffs Harbour.  Further detailed consultation will be undertaken pending Council’s endorsement of the roll-out. 

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

There are no policies, precedents and / or statutory requirements of note.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Should Council resolve to endorse the roll out of the Remote Rescue Tubes program over a maximum three-year period, engagement and confirmation of the roll-out would commence with key stakeholders by August 2021.

Conclusion:

The ‘Review Report’ (Attachment 1) summarises the Remote Rescue Tube Trial conducted between December 2019 and April 2020, including consultation activities and options moving forward.

Support is sought to enable the delivery of a three-year Remote Rescue Tubes roll-out program across the LGA in a co-ordinated and thorough manner, including all associated education and awareness campaigns that will be critical to the success of the project. 

 


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SI21/10         Duke Street, Coffs Harbour Traffic Changes

Author:                        Acting Group Leader, Strategic Asset Management

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

MyCoffs:                      D.2 We have effective use of public resources.

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

Council resolved (resolution No. 2021/721) to receive an assessment of the potential of altering the Duke Street and Harbour Drive intersection in the Coffs Harbour City Centre to allow for a right turn into Duke Street. The rationale of this notice is to relieve congestion on the City Centre local road network, in particular Gordon Street.

Council has reviewed the Duke Street extension project undertaken in 2016 as a basis to determine the feasibility of such an intersection modification. This indicated three concept options are feasible.  It is advised however that such works in isolation are not going to address the primary objective of relieving traffic volumes on Gordon Street.

The Coffs City Centre Masterplan 2031 envisages an ‘inner ring road’ to mitigate city centre congestion. To realise this vision would necessitate works beyond the Duke Street/Harbour Drive intersection.

A 2019 traffic impact assessment accompanying the Cultural and Civic Centre’s State Significant Development (SSD) application found the Gordon Street local road network will be satisfactory for the next 10 years and beyond.

 

Recommendation:

That Council note the information provided on the options for a right turn into Duke Street from Harbour Drive, Coffs Harbour.

 

Report

Description of Item:

At Council’s Ordinary Meeting of 22 April, 2021 Council resolved;

A report be bought back to council on cars being able to make a right hand turn into Duke Street when travelling West along Harbour Drive.”

This report will consider the above and provide further context of this intersection within the strategic City Centre Masterplan 2031.

Issues:

Background

Construction is underway on the Cultural and Civic Space which will front Gordon Street. As a result of this development, and a growing city centre in general, there are concerns regarding increased traffic and congestion in and around Gordon Street. A suggestion to address this is to introduce a right turn facility from Harbour Drive into Duke Street. The intersection in question and locality is shown below.

 

Locality

As part of the Cultural and Civic Centre State Significant Development (SSD) application, a Traffic Impact Assessment (TIA) was prepared by ASON Group. This assessed the impact of the additional traffic generated from the proposal along with an increase in usage on the road network over a 10 year period. ASON found that the development and general increase in usage have no material impact on the operation of the local road network.

To ascertain if there are any safety issues on the existing local road network that may benefit from a modification to the Duke Street/Harbour Drive intersection, a review of the Transport for NSW crash database from 2015 to 2019 has been undertaken and illustrates the crash history in the area.

TfNSW Crash Statistics for City Centre (source: TfNSW Centre for Road Safety)

The results indicate that there is not a systemic issue with the surrounding road network in terms of safety (i.e. accidents are not constrained to a single intersection and a single crash type). It can therefore be assumed that the existing road conditions are suitable and no amendments to existing infrastructure are required from a road safety perspective.

Duke Street / Harbour Drive Intersection Options

Council constructed a road connection between Duke Street and Harbour Drive in the 2016/2017 financial year (“Duke Street Extension”). The project intended to relieve congestion on the Gordon Street/Harbour Drive intersection and provided the benefit of an alternative route during the conversion of the roundabout at that intersection to signals. A number of concepts were considered for the intersection of Duke Street with Harbour Drive, as follows:

1.    Two lanes westbound on Harbour Drive, with ‘through’ and ‘right turn to Duke Street’ lanes separated.

2.    Roundabout with a separate westbound ‘through’ lane on Harbour Drive. 

3.    Priority movement from Harbour Drive onto Duke Street (i.e. vehicles do not have to yield or give way).

4.    A single lane westbound on Harbour Drive, with a shared ‘through’ and ‘right turn to Duke Street’ lane.

5.    No right turn into Duke Street; making the intersection left-in, left-out of Duke Street only.

Option 5 was the option that was progressed and constructed. Option 1, 2 and 3 would have resulted in a small loss of car spaces along Harbour Drive against Option 4 and 5 – concepts suggest up to 8, 19 and 8 spaces respectively. Feedback obtained from consultation with the City Centre Masterplan Committee and local businesses placed a high priority on maintaining carparking along Harbour Drive. Option 4 was not considered viable from a traffic impact perspective. Vehicles waiting to turn right into Duke Street would result in queuing on Harbour Drive that would impact the roundabout operation at Earl Street. Further, there were concerns that drivers would try to pass vehicles waiting to turn right using the ‘separation/manoeuvring lane’ which is provided for purpose of the angled parking on Harbour Drive, not as a travel lane.

Whilst further investigations would need to be undertaken to consider traffic, services and stormwater drainage impacts, it is assessed from an engineering perspective that Options 1, 2 and 3 provide feasible means for provision of a right turn into Duke Street. Options 2 and 3 would necessitate a minor reconfiguration of Pioneer Park.

Preliminary strategic cost estimates (30%) for the respective concepts are provided in table below.

 

Description

Strategic Cost Estimate (30%)

Concept Plan

Two lanes westbound on Harbour Drive,  with ‘through’ and ‘right turn to Duke Street’ lanes separated

 

$250,000

 

Roundabout with a separate westbound ‘through’ lane on Harbour Drive. 

 

$635,000

Priority movement from Harbour Drive onto Duke Street (i.e. vehicles do not have to yield or give way to make the turn).

 

$510,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strategic cost estimates of intersection concept designs

Ultimately, however, it is not envisaged that any of the aforementioned options for providing a right turn into Duke Street from Harbour Drive will alleviate the primary objective of congestion on Gordon Street and the City Centre in general.

A 2012 traffic modelling report prepared by Bitzios considered an intersection which allowed for a right turn into Duke Street from Harbour Drive. It predicted in 2022 that ~120 vehicles (15%) of westbound Harbour Drive traffic would use this right turn in the morning peak. This dropped to ~67 vehicles (8%) in the afternoon peak. Of this number, through traffic intending to reach the Pacific Highway would continue along Gordon Street as currently occurs. This is the route that is provided priority movement at intersections and is therefore quicker e.g. to continue on to Duke Street, drivers have to give way to traffic on Vernon Street and similarly with drivers from Coff Street give way to vehicles on Gordon Street. This is explored further in the following Strategic Context section.

Strategic Context

The City Centre Masterplan 2031 shows movement to and from Duke Street onto Harbour Drive (eastbound) as the priority route with a view to provide an ‘inner ring road’. See excerpt from the Masterplan below which illustrates this. This vision is continued through in the Precinct Analysis Gordon Street report. This strategic plan provides a bypass of the city centre for through traffic, leaving the city centre less congested and more desirable for users. Whilst providing for Duke Street to enter and exit Harbour Drive as a priority movement (Option 3) would be in keeping with the Masterplan, it would also necessitate additional reconfiguration of other intersections and road corridors to realise the intended benefits. Namely the intersections of Duke Street/ Vernon Street and Coff Street/Gordon Street along with reconfiguration of Coff Street between Duke Street and Gordon Street. Such works would result in a loss of parking. Opportunities for additional parking facilities identified in the Masterplan may need to be provided to compensate for this.

 

Access and Movement plan from City Centre Masterplan 2031

A very provisional cost estimate for the change of priority of three intersections, including Harbour Drive onto Duke Street and street reconfiguration of Coff Street (Duke Street to Gordon Street), to allow an ‘inner ring road’ is in the order of $2.5 million. This estimate would need considerable refining if this option was to be pursued further. This estimate excludes the provision of reconfiguration works along Duke Street, Gordon Street and elsewhere shown conceptually in the Masterplan as well as additional parking facilities.

 

Gordon Street Design Precinct Plan

Options:

Funding Options

City Centre Special Rate Variation (SRV)

Whilst a Special Rate Variation is being collected from the City Centre, there is no allocation within that for further works on the Duke Street intersection with Harbour Drive.

Government Grants

Grants are pursued as they come up from time to time. These projects may or may not meet applicable criteria for grant applications. 

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Some concept options may involve small modifications to Pioneer Park.

•     Social

The Duke Street/Harbour Drive intersection is on the eastern perimeter of the City Centre. This area provides economic and social value through retail, business, cultural and entertainment activities to those who live, work and visit the area.

•     Civic Leadership

The reconfiguration of Duke Street/Harbour Drive intersection show’s Council’s support for the vision of the City Centre Masterplan and a willingness to invest for the improvement in amenity of the City Centre to meet the needs of business and community.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

New assets proposed in this report would increase the maintenance burden on the network. Additional depreciation of these assets would need to be considered in renewal models.

Conversely, improving the balance between foot and vehicular traffic in the City Centre may improve the desirability of this destination.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

At present, the options presented are strategic in nature and do not have any direct implications.

Risk Analysis:

There are currently no risk factors believed to be motivating this project. This is supported by review of relevant Traffic Studies as well as Crash History database.  A reconfiguration of the intersection would not introduce any additional safety or network performance risks over the existing scenario.

Works would result in a small loss of parking which may be poorly received by adjacent businesses and community. Recent studies however indicate there is a current surplus of car parking in the area and the City Centre Masterplan 2031 identifies areas for provision of additional car parking in future if required.  The use of parallel parking on Harbour Drive, provided for in Options 2 and 3, may also be poorly received. It should be noted though that parallel parking is regarded as the safest form of on-street parking.

Consultation:

Internal consultation has been completed with project delivery staff, including project liaison officers, involved with the original Duke Street Extension project.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

·     Design would be subject to Local Traffic Committee endorsement

·     AustRoads Guide to Road Design suite

·     AustRoads Guide to Traffic Management suite

·     Review of project documentation associated with the Duke Street Extension project, including 2012 Traffic Modelling Report prepared by Bitzios Consulting.

·     Review of documentation associated with the Cultural and Civic Space development application, including 2019 Traffic Impact Assessment prepared by ASON Group.

·     Review of City Centre Masterplan 2031.

·     Review of Precinct Analysis Gordon Street report.

Implementation Date / Priority:

N/A

Conclusion:

There are three feasible concept options that could be considered that would permit cars to make a right hand turn into Duke Street when traveling west along Harbour Drive. Ultimately however, it is believed a larger scope of works would be required to achieve the objective of reducing traffic volumes on Gordon Street. An ‘inner ring road’ as envisaged by the City Centre Masterplan would be an option to achieve this objective.

There are currently no funding options available for such a project to proceed. Funding options would need to be sought through government grants. Delivery of the project and allocation of resources would need to be prioritised against other transport projects.

 

 


SI21/12         Draft Brelsford Park Masterplan

Author:                        Works Program Co-ordinator

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

MyCoffs:                      A.2 An active, safe and healthy community

Attachments:              ATT1  SI21/12    Draft Brelsford Park Precinct Analysis and Masterplan June 2021  

 

Executive Summary

This report is a response to the resolution from the Council meeting of 13 May 2021, “That a report be brought back to Council to proceed further with a Masterplan for Brelsford Park” (Resolution No. 2021/95). It also seeks Council endorsement of the Draft Brelsford Park Precinct Plan and Masterplan (Brelsford Park Masterplan) to be placed on public exhibition. This is an update of the concept contained in the Coffs Harbour City Centre Masterplan 2031 (CC Masterplan) adopted by Council at their meeting on 28 February 2013.

Following public exhibition, the final Brelsford Park Masterplan will be presented to Council for their approval to be incorporated in the CC Masterplan 2031.

The improved Plan will support future funding applications, and provide strategic direction for the development of the Park.

 

Recommendation:

That Council endorse the Draft Brelsford Park Masterplan as part of the City Centre Masterplan 2031 to be placed on public exhibition for 28 days.

 

Report

Description of Item:

This report is a response to the Resolution from the Council meeting dated 13 May 2021, “That a report be brought back to Council to proceed further with a Masterplan for Brelsford Park” (Resolution No. 2021/95).

The Brelsford Park Concept is an endorsed project within the Coffs Harbour City Centre Masterplan 2031 (CC Masterplan), adopted by Council on 28 February 2013. The Brelsford Park Concept (on page 53 of the CC Masterplan) was not drawn to scale or to survey, and did not provide enough detail to allow Council to apply for grant funding or progress to the construction of different elements of the Park.

Council has now developed a draft Brelsford Park Precinct Plan and Masterplan (Brelsford Park Masterplan - see attached). The aim of the Draft Brelsford Park Masterplan is to build on the goals outlined in the CC Masterplan, incorporating the original unsurveyed design and embellishing it. The planning areas for the precinct analysis included the city centre as identified in the CC Masterplan, and expands the catchment to include the surrounding residential zones land and surrounding land uses. It identifies possible benefits to these surrounding areas and their impacts on the Park.

The CC Masterplan contains this vision for Brelsford Park:

Brelsford Park is a vibrant civic public park and focal point of the city. Connecting the City Centre, community and surrounding environment through tree lined pathways, this prominent green space supports the lifestyle and well-being of our community. Brelsford Park is a lively and inclusive place, where community culture and leisure come to life.

The draft plan reflects the original concept design in its repetitive use of a series of ovals and circular shapes with intersecting straight lines to create spaces and define certain areas.

Wide footpaths connect Earl Street to Curacoa Street and 2 arching paths from Earl Street to Albany Street. The Park is divided into 4 key areas:

1.       Amenities, kiosk and public seating area

2.       Event space kiosk seating and amphitheatre

3.       Active recreation

4.       Water play

The tennis courts were omitted from the study pending a tennis feasibility study which is nearing completion.

Further to the completion of the draft Brelsford Park Masterplan, Council included Brelsford Park in the application for the Bushfire Local Economic Recovery fund (BLERF) in January 2021. The application was for $4,997,620.00 for the following elements of the plan:

-        Path connections

-        Main path lighting

-        Civic entry pavement

-        Civic entry shade structure

-        Skate park shade structure

-        Water play*

-        Picnic and seating

-        Tree planting

-        Public amenities block

-        Temporary kiosk space

-        Amphitheatre

-        Small stage and paths

-        Small stage roof

-        Village green including drainage and turf

*smaller than shown on the Masterplan

The application did not include the:

-        Active recreation zone

-        Changes to parking on Curacoa Street

-        Changes to the tennis club

-        The perimeter path around the Village Green

-        Large stage

The successful BLERF projects have not yet been announced by NSW Government.

Issues:

There are no issues arising with placing the Draft Brelsford Park Masterplan on exhibition, as it is based on the original endorsed concept plan included in the CC Masterplan 2031, and submissions will be considered by Staff and Council.

Options:

1.    Endorse the Draft Brelsford Park Masterplan to be placed on public exhibition.

2.    Request a review of the original Brelsford Park Concept plan within the City Centre Masterplan. This will have budgetary implications, and will defer Council’s ability to accept grant funding for the Park.

3.    Do nothing: this will not address the objectives of the CC Masterplan. The Park does not meet the standards of functionality and condition for an inner city park.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Brelsford Park is preserved as a prominent green space within the city. This aligns with the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan objective “to provide liveable neighbourhoods… and a natural environment sustained for the future”.

The connecting paths, and redesigned on-street parking zones promote walking and cycling and reduce the dependence on cars.

Brelsford Park is the missing green link that connects City Hill to the Coffs Creek green belt. The only remnant vegetation identified within the park is located on the south east corner with ten significant trees identified that must be retained. The plan aims to fill the missing vegetative link and establish a green network.

•     Social

Brelsford Park is a focal point as a green community space. However, there are currently only two main areas of activity: the existing skate park and the children’s playground. There is very limited activity throughout the remainder of the park.

The opportunities presented in the draft Brelsford Park Masterplan include:

-        Establishing priorities for pedestrians and cyclists

-        Creating desirable connections through Brelsford Park

-        Improving public amenity and creating ‘edge friction’, encouraging traffic to slow down

-        Creating an entry point into the Park for a sense of ‘arrival’ and to reclaim public space

-        Enhancing vegetation to create a sense of ‘place’.

-        Use of the space for active accessible recreation and a range of events

-        Additional public seating and a mobile kiosk site.

-        Potential for outdoor classroom opportunities for surrounding educational establishments bordering the Park.

•     Civic Leadership

The CC Masterplan 2031 was endorsed by Council in February 2013. It is in accord with the original intent of the Masterplan to revitalise the City Centre and stimulate economic activity.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The draft Brelsford Park Masterplan will facilitate applications for grant funding, as currently the project is unfunded.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

There are no economic implications for the Delivery Program at present. Once the elements are constructed, there will be implications for operation and maintenance of the new facilities, which will be costed at the detailed design stage.

Risk Analysis:

Risk assessments are on-going at every stage of project implementation. The endorsement of the Draft Brelsford Park Masterplan for exhibition presents minimal risk.

Consultation:

Extensive consultation for the CC Masterplan 2031, involving hundreds of people, was undertaken when originally developed, including collaboration with youth groups to develop the Brelsford Skate Park.

Internal consultation was conducted as part of the development of the Draft Brelsford Park Masterplan and the application for the BLERF application.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan 2017

Coffs Harbour City Centre Masterplan 2031

Coffs Harbour Events Strategy 2020

Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan 2015

Coffs Harbour Place and Movement Plan (draft)

Implementation Date / Priority:

The draft plan will be incorporated into the CC Masterplan documents when approved.

Conclusion:

Following endorsement by Council, the Draft Brelsford Park Masterplan will be placed on public exhibition for 28 days. A report will then be presented to Council for approval of the Brelsford Park Masterplan to be incorporated into the CC Masterplan 2031.

Its endorsement will provide an improved Plan which may then support future funding applications, and provide strategic direction for the development of the Park.

 

 


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