Coffs Harbour City Council

17 March 2021

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

The above meeting will be held in the Council Administration Building

Cnr Coff and Castle Streets, Coffs Harbour on:

 

Thursday, 25 March 2021

 

The meeting commences at 5.00pm and your attendance is requested.

 

 

AGENDA

 

1.         Opening of Ordinary Meeting

2.         Acknowledgment of Country

3.         Public Forum

4.         Disclosure of Interest

5.         Apologies

6.         Leaves of Absence

7.         Mayoral Minute

8.         Confirmation of Minutes

9.         Rescission Motion

10.      Notices of Motion – General

11.      General Manager’s Reports

12.      Notices of Motion – Business Services

13.      Directorate Reports – Business Services

14.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Communities

15.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Communities

16.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Infrastructure

17.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Infrastructure

18.      Questions On Notice

19.      Matters of an Urgent Nature

20.      Consideration of Confidential Items (if any)

21.      Close of Ordinary Meeting

 

 

Steve McGrath

General Manager

 

 


Order of Business

 

 

General Manager's Reports

GM21/02         Update to the Model Code of Conduct and Procedures for the Operation of the Model code of Conduct............................................... 3

Directorate Reports - Business Services

BS21/16          Bank and Investment Balances for February 2021........................... 152

BS21/17          Update on Rent Waivers for Council Tenants Impacted by COVID-19 Restrictions....................................................................................................... 174

BS21/18          Coffs Harbour Airport Lease Proceeds - Governance Arrangements................................................................................................... 178

Directorate Reports - Sustainable Communities

SC21/13          Planning Proposal - Application to Amend Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 To Rezone Land - Lot 1 DP 360716 & Lot 15 DP 7956, 288-294 Coramba Road, Coffs Harbour - Pre Exhibition.................................................................. 195

Notices of Motion Sustainable Infrastructure

NOM21/05      Woolgoolga Public School - Parking & Drop Off Areas................ 282

NOM21/06      Robin Street Parking..................................................................................... 283

Directorate Reports - Sustainable Infrastructure

SI21/04           New Alcohol Prohibited Reserve - Brian Navin Reserve, Columbus Street, Coffs Harbour.................................................................................. 284

SI21/05           Status Update - House Sewer Connection Inflow Strategy....... 288

SI21/06           Local Roads and Community Infrastructure Grant....................... 294


GM21/02      Update to the Model Code of Conduct and Procedures for the Operation of the Model code of Conduct

Author:                        Governance Coordinator

Authoriser:                  Group Leader Governance

MyCoffs:                      D.1 Our leaders give us confidence in the future

Attachments:              ATT1  GM21/02  Code of Conduct Policy

ATT2  GM21/02  Code of Conduct - Procedures for Administration of Model Code of Conduct

ATT3  GM21/02  Code of Conduct Policy (with changes highlighted)

ATT4  GM21/02  Code of Conduct - Procedures for Administration of Model Code of Conduct (with changes highlighted)  

 

Executive Summary

In 2020, the Office of Local Government amended the Model Code of Conduct (Model Code) and Model Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct (Model Procedures) for Local Councils.  These amendments are mandatory for Council, except for the increase to the cap on the value of gifts and benefits that council officials can accept.  This report presents the Code of Conduct Policy and Procedures, with the required amendments, for Council  adoption, but opts not to increase the cap on gifts and benefits.

 

Recommendation:

That Council adopt the amended Code of Conduct Policy and Procedures for Administration of Model Code of Conduct.

 

Report

Description of Item:

In 2020, the Office of Local Government (OLG) announced that it had made amendments to the Model Code of Conduct (Model Code) and Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct (Model Procedures).  The OLG advised that the new Model Code of Conduct (Attachment 1) and Procedures (Attachment 2) take effect immediately as the amendments to the procedures largely reflect existing practice and the amendments to the Model Code of Conduct are minor in nature.  The OLG recommended that councils adopt a Code of Conduct and Procedures with the amendments.

 

In adopting an amended Code of Conduct Policy and Procedures, Council must ensure that it does not adopt provisions that are inconsistent with the Models unless these inconsistent provisions are more onerous.

 

The only amendment that councils are not obliged to adopt is the option to increase the cap on the receipt of gifts and benefits from $50 to $100.  Council’s Group Leadership Team were consulted on this option and it determined that the current cap of $50 is still appropriate and the attached Code of Conduct Policy reflects this.

Issues:

There are no issues associated with adoption of the attached Code of Conduct Policy and Procedures. 

 

Attachment 3 and 4 show the changes made to the documents, grey showing the deletions and green showing the additions.

Options:

It is considered that the following options are available to Council:

 

1.    Adopt the recommendation provided to Council.

2.    Amend the recommendation and then adopt.  However, Councillors will need to be mindful that any amendments inconsistent with the Model Code or Model Procedures must be more onerous, otherwise they are overridden by the Model Code and Model Procedures.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental issues associated with this report.

•     Social

Council’s Code of Conduct Policy and Procedure sets the minimum standards of conduct for council officials.  This provides the community and general public with the detail of these standards so they are aware of Council’s obligations and can have confidence in council.

•     Civic Leadership

This policy enables Council to identify and respond to conduct concerns.  This is consistent with the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan Strategy D.1 Our leaders give us confidence in the future.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

There are no broad economic impacts associated with the adoption of the amended Code of Conduct Policy and Procedure.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The ongoing development and review of the Council policy and procedures is accommodated within Council’s budget structure.  This expenditure is monitored through Council’s monthly and quarterly budget reviews.

Risk Analysis:

There are no perceived risks in the adoption of the attached Code of Conduct Policy and Procedure.

Consultation:

Internal consultation was conducted with Council’s Group Leadership Team regarding the optional increase to the cap on gifts and benefits.  As all the other amendments are mandatory, no further consultation was held.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Section 440 of the Local Government Act 1993 and Clause 180-181 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2005.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Immediate.

Conclusion:

That Council adopt the attached Code of Conduct Policy and Procedures.

 

 


PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


BS21/16       Bank and Investment Balances for February 2021

Author:                        Section Leader Financial Planning

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

MyCoffs:                      D.2 We have effective use of public resources.

Attachments:              ATT1  BS21/16   Investment Performance Report for the Month Ended 28 February 2021  

 

Executive Summary

Council’s Bank Balances and Investments as at 28 February 2021 totalled $232,316,712.60.  Council receives independent advice and invests surplus funds in accordance with Council’s Investment Policy to maximise investment income and preserve capital to assist with funding requirements for projects listed under the Delivery Program and associated Operational Plans.

 

Recommendation:

That Council note the bank balances and investments totalling $232,316,712.60 (including from loans, Developer Contributions and other avenues that form the restricted accounts and are committed for future works) as at 28 February 2021.

 

Report

Description of Item:

A copy of the state of Bank Balances and Investments as at 28 February 2021 is attached.  Also included is a summary of Council’s Socially Responsible Investment Performance.  It should be noted that Council is required to account for investments in accordance with the Australian International Financial Reporting Standards.  Term deposits are shown at face value and all other investment balances at the end of each month reflect market value movements, which would be inclusive of accrued interest.

 

Interest when paid, say quarterly, would result in reductions in the market value of the investments. The Investment Report reflects the above requirements and reflects the interest earned (or accrued) on each investment, based on the acquisition price.

 

The bank balances and investment total of $232,316,712.60 as at 28 February 2021 is allocated between Council’s external restrictions, internal restrictions and unrestricted funds.

 

The balance of Council’s cash, cash equivalents and investments as at 30 June 2020 was attributable to external restrictions, internal restrictions and unrestricted funds as follows:

 

Fund

$000

External Restrictions

127,904

Internal Restrictions

88,300

Unrestricted

9,024

Total

225,228

 

Final calculations to determine external and internal restrictions are carried out during End of Financial Year Financial Statement preparation.

 

External restrictions account for over 56% of the cash, cash equivalent and investments held by Council; comprising of Developer Contributions, unexpended grants, unexpended loans, Water fund reserves, Sewer fund reserves and the Domestic Waste Management reserve as reported in Council’s Annual Financial Statements.

 

The below graph provides a breakdown of the bank and investment balances by Fund as at 28 February 2021.

 

 

The following line graph shows the rolling trend of Council’s bank balance and investment totals for a period of 13 months to 28 February 2021.

 

 

 

 

Reports written by Laminar Group Pty Ltd (Council’s investment portfolio advisors), which examine economic and financial markets data for February 2021 are available in the Councillors’ Resource Centre.

Issues:

There are no issues associated with this report.

Options:

As this report is for noting only, an options analysis is not required.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Included in the monthly report is a summary of Council’s Socially Responsible Investment Performance (refer Attachment 1).

•     Social

There are no perceived current or future social impacts from the information contained in this report.

•     Civic Leadership

Council invests surplus funds to maximise investment income and preserve capital to assist with funding requirements for projects listed under the Delivery Program and associated Operational Plans.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Council’s investments are held according to the requirements stated within Council’s Investment Policy and the returns are acceptable in relation thereto.  In the long term, earnings from investments can vary due to economic conditions and financial markets.  Council constructs its investment portfolio with consideration of current conditions and to comply with the Office of Local Government Investment Policy Guidelines.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

As at 28 February 2021, it is noted that the total bank and investment balance was $232,316,712.60 comprising restricted and unrestricted General, Trust, Water and Sewer Funds’ cash and investments.

Risk Analysis:

The likelihood of risks associated with New South Wales Local Government’s investing funds is now remote due to the conservative nature of investments permitted under statutory requirements.  The risk of capital not being returned in relation to each individual investment Council owns is indicated in the attachment.  Council officers have considered the risk to its portfolio in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Council has portfolio policy limits and risk management related strategy that provide protection against exposure to investment related risks.  Council also has maximum holding limits based on credit quality and counterparty limits and there is not considered to be a significant increase in these risks at this point in time.

 

The main risks for Council’s investment portfolio are liquidity and credit risk, both of which are being managed under the advice of Laminar Group Pty Ltd. Liquidity risk is the risk that the Council is unable to redeem the investment at a fair price within a timely period and thereby incurs additional costs (or in the worst case is unable to execute its spending plans).  Credit risk is the risk of loss of principal stemming from a financial institutions failure to repay that principal when that principal is due.  Council is compensated for assuming credit risk by way of interest payments from the financial institutions issuing the investment security.

 

Credit risk is rated by various rating agencies.  Investment securities in Council’s current portfolio are rated by either Standard and Poors or Fitch, with the majority of the portfolio rated by Standard and Poors.  Standard and Poors credit ratings and an explanation of their ratings are as follows:

 

Rating

Ratings Explanation

AAA

Extremely strong capacity to meet financial commitments.  Highest Rating.

AA

Very strong capacity to meet financial commitments.

A

Strong capacity to meet financial commitments, but somewhat susceptible to adverse economic conditions and changes in circumstances.

BBB

Adequate capacity to meet financial commitments, but more subject to adverse economic conditions.

BBB-

Considered lowest investment grade by market participants.

BB+

Considered highest speculative grade by market participants.

BB

Less vulnerable in the near term but faces major ongoing uncertainties to adverse business, financial and economic conditions.

B

More vulnerable to adverse business, financial and economic conditions but currently has the capacity to meet financial commitments.

CCC

Currently vulnerable and dependent on favourable business, financial and economic conditions to meet financial commitments.

CC

Currently highly vulnerable.

C

Currently highly vulnerable obligations and other defined circumstances.

D

Payment default on financial commitments.

 

Ratings from ‘AA’ to ‘CCC’ may be modified by the addition of a plus (+) or minus (-) sign to show relative standing within the major rating categories.

 

Types of investment securities by credit risk ranking from highest to lowest are as follows:

 

-     Deposits/Covered Bonds – these share first ranking

-     Senior debt – Floating Rate Notes/Fixed Coupon Bonds.

-     Subordinated debt

-     Hybrids

-     Preference shares

-     Equity shares (common shares).

 

Subordinated debt, hybrids, preference and equity shares are not a permitted investment under the current Ministerial Order.  Term deposits of $250,000 or less per financial institution are covered under the Commonwealth Government Deposit Guarantee Scheme and therefore by default have the same credit rating as the Commonwealth Government, i.e. AAA.

 

All credit unions, building societies and mutual banks are Authorised Deposit-taking Institutions (ADIs) and are regulated in the same way as all other Australian banks.  ADIs are regulated by the Australian Securities and Investment Commission under the Corporations Act 2001, and by the Australian Prudential Regulatory Authority under the Banking Act 1959.

Consultation:

Council’s investment advisors, Laminar Group Pty Ltd have been consulted in the preparation of this report.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Council funds have been invested in accordance with Council’s Investment Policy (POL‑049), which was adopted on 24 August 2017.

Local Government Act 1993 – Section 625.

Local Government Act 1993 – Investment Order (dated 12 January 2011).

Local Government General Regulation 2005.

The Trustee Amendment (Discretionary Investments) Act 1997 – Sections 14A(2), 14C(1) and 14C(2).

Implementation Date / Priority:

Nil.

Conclusion:

Council should consider the information provided in the report and the Councillors’ Resource Centre and the recommendation provided.

 

 

 


PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


BS21/17       Update on Rent Waivers for Council Tenants Impacted by COVID-19 Restrictions

Author:                        Group Leader Financial Services and Logistics

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

MyCoffs:                      A.2 An active, safe and healthy community

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

Many businesses in the Coffs Harbour City Council area have been adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and the associated steps that have been taken by governments to slow down infection levels.

 

Council is a landlord for many organisations and businesses throughout the Local Government Area and has already implemented assistance for business and community groups that have been adversely affected.

 

The economic recovery of the region is having flow on impacts to Council’s tenants which has seen a significant reduction in requests for rental assistance from the Council to an amount of only $1,550 over the last quarter.  It is considered that state regulations will now be sufficient to provide adequate support to Council tenants should assistance be required and that assistance above and beyond this is no longer required.

 

The Council has been approached by both the Ayrshire Park Management Committee and the Woolgoolga Sports Council to provide a small amount of financial assistance due to these two organisations providing fee waivers to local sports clubs for use of sports fields during the height of the pandemic in line with the Council’s decision to waive fees on Council controlled sports grounds during this period.  These requests are considered appropriate and it is recommended a donation be made to both organisations for $4,500 each.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Note the report; and

2.       Provide a donation of $4,500 each to the Ayrshire Park Management Committee and the Woolgoolga Sports Council.

 

Report

Description of Item:

At its meeting held 8 October 2020, Council resolved:

 

That Council:

 

1.    Request all tenants to provide information to Council to enable an assessment to be made in accordance with the Retail and Other Commercial Leases (COVID-19) Regulation 2020 and the General Manager be delegated authority to determine the level of assistance from the Council as outlined in this Regulation for the period 1 October 2020 – 31 March 2021 (inclusive), noting that a review will occur on a quarterly basis.

 

2.    Request a further report in March 2021 to allow consideration for a further period of rental waivers and/or deferrals in accordance with the Retail and Other Commercial Leases (COVID-19) Regulation 2020 for impacted tenants.

 

This report addresses item 2 contained within the resolution.

 

Council provides licensing and leasing agreements for Council owned or managed property to community, commercial, sporting, telecommunication carriers, government departments, preschool and other groups and in most cases these agreements have been in place for many years, playing an important part in the Coffs Harbour community.

 

Over the past 9 months the Council has provided substantial assistance to its tenants and this was continued with the resolution on 8 October 2020.

 

The National Cabinet released the National Cabinet Mandatory Code of Conduct SME Commercial Leasing Principles during COVID-19.  This Code was enshrined into New South Wales law by the Retail and Other Commercial Leases (COVID-19) Regulation 2020.  The operation of the National Cabinet Mandatory Code of Conduct for New South Wales was extended to 28 March 2021.  However, there has been a tapering off of the eligibility criteria to gain access to assistance under this regulation.

 

Given the ongoing nature of the pandemic, the Regulation was extended to 31 December 2020.  On 1 January 2021, the NSW Government enacted the Retail and Other Commercial Leases (COVID-19) Regulation (No 3), extending the operation of the Regulation to 31 March 2021 but tapering off the eligibility criteria to apply only to:

 

-      retail tenants/leases;

-      with an annual turnover of less than $5 million; and

-      who suffered a decline in turnover of 30% or more during the December 2020 quarter (as compared to the December 2019 quarter).

 

Council is obliged to continue to honour this assistance whilst ever this regulation is in force and will continue to do so.

 

The first and second round of rental waivers provided by the Council exceeded the conditions in the regulation, which was considered reasonable under the circumstances.  For the third round of rental waivers or deferrals it was considered prudent for the Council to undertake a further assessment of individual circumstances rather than the blanket approach taken previously.  This has been undertaken for the 6 months to 31 March 2021.  For the period 1 October to 31 December 2020 the Council had granted waivers in accordance with the legislation totalling $30,116.  For the period 1 January 2021 to 12 March 2021 the Council has granted waivers totalling $1,550.  This significant reduction in waivers indicates that Council tenants have seen activity increase during this period reducing the need for any further assistance from Council.

 

Council has also been approached by two organisations who maintain sporting fields within the Local Government Area.  The Ayrshire Park Management Committee and the Woolgoolga Sports Council maintain the sports fields in their respective areas and last year, in alignment with the Council decision to waive fees for sporting groups at Council controlled fields, also provided a waiver to local sports clubs accessing their fields.  This has led to these organisations having a significant deficit in operational funding during the last 12 months and it is recommended that the Council provide a $4,500 donation to both organisations to assist with ongoing operational needs for the facilities which they maintain.  It is proposed that this donation will be provided from the Council’s building maintenance budget.

Issues:

Over the past twelve months the Council has provided rent waivers in excess of $300,000, which has been well received within the community and has assisted many organisations and businesses be able to continue trading through the COVID-19 pandemic.

Options:

The following options are available for Council’s consideration:

 

1.    Adopt the recommendation.

2.    Note the report and not provide a donation to the Ayrshire Park Management Committee and the Woolgoolga Sports Council.

3.    Reject the recommendation.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental impacts from the information contained in this report.

•     Social

The social impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic will be felt for some considerable time into the future.  Providing assistance to the community during this time has been considered necessary to lead the community through the crisis and into the recovery phase.

•     Civic Leadership

The Coffs Harbour community, like most other communities throughout the world, is trying to come to terms with the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.  As the level of government closest to the community, Council is being charged with providing leadership to our community in a time of need.

 

Council demonstrated significant leadership during the Pandemic by assisting through various measures, some of which were included in the resolutions of 26 March, 23 April, 11 June, 9 July and 8 October 2020 and further through the recommendation provided in this report.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

By putting in place the assistance it has over the last twelve months for our community, the groundwork was laid to allow our community to recover in the short to medium term.  The local economy is showing signs of recovery.  It is important that all levels of government continue to monitor this recovery and provide some measure of financial assistance, if required, to allow this recovery to continue into the future.

 

However, it is also important for Council to remain financially capable to continue to provide ongoing service delivery to support the entire community.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The implications faced as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic have had a detrimental impact on the Delivery Program and Operational Plan for the 2020/21 financial year.  The financial impact on the Council’s 2020/21 budget of the recommendation from this report is able to be covered within existing budgets.

Risk Analysis:

There is a risk that should Council not provide the assistance outlined within this report that the two community groups may not be able to provide their services into the future which would then fall to the responsibility of Council which will over time incur expenses far greater than the $9,000 in donations.

Consultation:

-      Other Local Government property teams within NSW

-      Local Government authorities across Australia

-      Relevant internal Council staff

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

-      Natwional Cabinet Mandatory Code of Conduct SME Commercial Leasing Principles During COVID-19

-      Retail and Other Commercial Leases (COVID-19) Regulation 2020 NSW

-      COVID -19 Recovery Plan

Implementation Date / Priority:

Should Council resolve to adopt the recommendation within this report, it will be implemented with immediate effect and communicated to the relevant parties without delay.

Conclusion:

This report provides an update as requested in Council’s resolution from the 8 October 2020 meeting for Council’s consideration relating to rental abatements.  It is considered that the economic environment in Coffs Harbour in now in a position where the Council can rely on the relevant regulation to provide further assistance to tenants as required.  It is also considered appropriate to provide a one-off donation to each of the Ayrshire Park Management Committee and the Woolgoolga Sports Council to assist in the operational requirements to maintain sports grounds for which they are responsible.

 

 

 


BS21/18       Coffs Harbour Airport Lease Proceeds - Governance Arrangements

Author:                        Commercial and Compliance Manager

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

MyCoffs:                      D.1 Our leaders give us confidence in the future

Attachments:              ATT1  BS21/18   Coffs Harbour Airport Lease Proceeds - Governance Review

ATT2  BS21/18   CONFIDENTIAL Coffs Harbour Airport Lease Proceeds - Governance Review Appendix

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act as it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.  

 

Executive Summary

At its meeting on 26 November 2020, Council requested a report on the holding structure and governance arrangements for funds received from the airport lease.  KPMG were requested by staff to provide advice on this matter and, based on this advice, a recommendation has been formulated and is now presented to Council for consideration and adoption.  This includes a separate internal reserve/fund governance approach, a new Capital Allocation Policy and an updated Investment Policy to reflect the Investment Strategy for the proceeds from the airport lease.  Once Council endorses an approach the full policy documents will be prepared for Council’s further consideration.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.    Adopt a separate internal reserve/fund governance approach to hold the airport lease proceeds.

2.    Endorse the Capital Allocation Policy criteria outlined in this report.

3.    Amend Council’s Investment Policy to incorporate the Investment Strategy outlined in this report.

4.    Prepare a draft Capital Allocation Policy and updated Investment Policy for Council’s consideration.

 

Report

Description of Item:

At its meeting on 26 November 2020, after a four stage process, Council resolved enter into a long term lease of the Coffs Harbour Airport (CHA) and delegated the General Manager to execute the required agreements and deeds.  On 9 December 2020 the Implementation Agreement, Equity Commitment Deed and Independent Certifier Deed were executed.

 

As part of the resolution, Council requested a report on the holding structure and governance arrangements for funds received from the airport lease, which is the purpose of this report.  KPMG were requested by staff to provide advice on this matter and, based on this advice (Attachment 1 and Confidential Attachment 2), a recommendation has been formulated and is now presented to Council for consideration and adoption.

Issues:

The advice report from KPMG covers the Investment Strategy, Capital Allocation Policy, Governance Framework and Holding Structure for the airport lease proceeds (the Proceeds) and each of these elements are discussed below.

 

Investment Strategy

 

Investment Strategy refers to the process for the investment of a portion of the Proceeds to earn a return, and may include the engagement of external investment managers or advisers.

 

Council is subject to a Local Government Act 1993 Investment Order and Investment Policy Guidelines, which are incorporated into Council’s current Investment Policy.  This restricts Council to low risk and therefore relatively low return investments.  Therefore, it is considered preferable to invest the Proceeds using an updated form only of the Investment Policy rather than outsourcing investment to a separate externally managed fund.  Also, ensuring the investment portfolio is relatively liquid will support the Capital Allocation Policy.

 

Suggested rules for the Investment Strategy, to be including in an updated Investment Policy, include:

 

·     An allocation of 10% of the opening value of the Proceeds Account in any single year.

·     Investment of the remaining Proceeds on a rolling five years’ basis to ensure sufficient liquidity for Capital Allocation.

·     Investment returns to be paid to the Proceeds Account.

 

Capital Allocation Policy

 

Capital Allocation refers to the use of the Proceeds in strategic community projects.  Regardless of the holding structure, a Capital Allocation Policy should be agreed which defines the criteria for projects to qualify for Capital Allocation and the decision threshold for any changes that impact this policy should be clearly defined.

 

KPMG has suggested the following voting rules for the Capital Allocation Policy:

 

·     A project which meets the Capital Allocation Policy criteria requires a simple majority approval by the elected Council.

·     Changes to, or expenditure not in accordance with, the Capital Allocation Policy requires 75% approval by the elected Council; that is, 7 out of 9 Councillors.  The purpose of the super-majority is to ensure that this key policy is only changed or varied from when there is a strong consensus among the elected Councillors.  This is particularly relevant given the large value of the Proceeds to be allocated and the number of allocation decisions to be made through this policy.  The alternative approach would be to maintain current practice when approving funding and require a simple majority.

 

The recommended set of criteria to be included in the Capital Allocation Policy to ensure proposed projects meet Council’s strategic goals through a robust assessment are detailed below.  The Capital Allocation Policy will also include a template to be completed for a proposed project to facilitate its assessment against the policy before a project recommendation is made to Council.

 

·     Objective - Defined as “To fund strategic community projects into the future, including investment in, or improvement of, CHCC assets or services for current and future generations.”  The objective is reasonably broad to provide a level of flexibility into the future; however, it highlights the need for projects to be strategic in nature.

·     Strategic definition guidelines – Projects should have the potential to facilitate or be associated with enhanced business activities, environmental outcomes, increased economic activity or an increase in population in the region.  This criterion provides guidance on the type of macro outcomes that projects are expected to provide.

·     Broad benefit – Projects should benefit the broader community.  This criterion ensures that projects provide benefit broadly rather than to a smaller segment of the community.

·     Project identification – Projects should be identified as part of the development of the CHCC Delivery Program and annual Operational Plan.  This criterion links the policy directly to Council’s Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework, which is Council’s primary planning and resource allocation process.

·     Location – Projects should largely be within, or for the benefit of, the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area (LGA).  This criterion ensures the residents of the LGA are the primary beneficiaries of projects.

·     Project limits – Up to 2028: no more than $7.5 million in a single project, or more than $15 million in Capital Allocation in any two consecutive years. 2028 onwards: no more than $15 million in a single project, or more than $30 million in Capital Allocation in any two consecutive years.  These limits are established to assist in Capital Allocation on multiple projects over time to encourage the best use of the Proceeds.  The limits for Capital Allocation are increased from 2028 due to the receipt of a significant amount of fixed Proceeds at that time.

·     Minimum size – Projects should be for a minimum size of $7.5 million (indexed by CPI from 2028).  This limit is established to ensure the Proceeds are used on projects of reasonable scale, which also supports them being strategic and for broad community benefit.

·     Number of projects – Between 7 – 15, being a target only.  This criterion signals the desire to fund a number of projects over time; however, it is not mandatory to provide Council flexibility around the ultimate number of projects funded.

·     Restricted projects – The Cultural and Civic Space Project, any project that would fall outside Council’s current Investment Policy (for example, socially and environmentally harmful activities) or projects not aligned with the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.  This criterion identifies projects are definitely not to be funded from the Proceeds.

·     No alternative funding – The project cannot be fully funded by alternative available and suitable funding. This criterion ensures other funding sources are considered before the Proceeds are used.

·     External confirmation – Each project proposal for Capital Allocation requires an accompanying confirmation from an external adviser or consultant that the project meets the criteria in the Capital Allocation Policy.  This requirement provides a level of independent peer review of proposed projects to strengthen the governance arrangements.

·     Emergency funding – Allocation from the Proceeds Account to the CHCC General Fund in very limited circumstances (such as to remedy default under a financing arrangement, significant damage to CHCC owned assets in a natural disaster, etc).  This criterion provides a safety net for Council to use the Proceeds in limited and genuine emergency circumstances.

 

Governance Framework

 

Governance Framework arrangements should be robust and ensure compliance with the Investment Strategy and Capital Allocation Policy but also provide certain flexibility to changes that may be required over time to ensure the outcomes remain in the best interest of the broader community.

 

Various governance arrangements including combinations of elected Councillors, senior Council staff and independents were considered by KPMG.  In particular, a governance arrangement with independents as part of the governance arrangements could be considered, such as through an advisory committee; however, Council would still be able at some future time to terminate such arrangements.  On balance, it is considered appropriate that the democratically elected Council should be accountable to the community for adopted policies and any changes to them that they resolve.

 

Holding Structure

 

Holding Structure ties together the Investment Strategy and Capital Allocation Policy to ensure they are aligned and deliver the overarching objectives over the long-term and supports the preferred governance arrangements.

 

KPMG considered a range of possible holding structures from internally holding in the General Fund to externally managed fund(s).  When considering the size of the investment portfolio, the costs of management and the use of policy control it is considered appropriate to use a separate internal reserve or fund as the holding structure.  This provides separation from other reserves, allows efficient management of the investment portfolio and also aligns to the Capital Allocation Policy.

 

One possible existing independent Holding Structure that could be considered is the wholly owned Council company Prosper Coffs Harbour Limited, which was established with a currently inactive Trust Fund to promote economic development.  However, as the focus of the company and its active environmental and cultural trusts has been on a relatively small pool of charitable donations and associated projects, it is not considered suitable for the Capital Allocation mandate that would apply to the Proceeds.

Options:

In relation to this report Council has the following options.

 

1.    Adopt the recommendation provided to Council, including a separate internal reserve/fund governance approach and preparation of a draft Capital Allocation Policy and updated Investment Policy for Council’s consideration.

2.    Amend the recommendation to adopt an alternative governance approach and/or different Capital Allocation Policy criteria and/or a different Investment Strategy.

3.    Reject the recommendation and manage the airport lease proceeds under Council’s existing policy framework as part of the general revenue in the General Fund.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no direct environmental impacts as a result of this report.  However, the governance arrangements could eventually lead to the funding of projects that are beneficial to the environment.

•     Social

There are no direct social impacts as a result of this report.  However, the governance arrangements will lead to the funding of projects that are beneficial to the community.

•     Civic Leadership

The development of a specific governance framework and associated policies for the Proceeds demonstrates a commitment by Council to target their use for strategic community benefit.  This approach is consistent with the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan objectives:

 

-     D1 Our leaders give us confidence in the future.

-     D2.1 We effectively manage the planning and provision of regional public services and infrastructure.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The Capital Allocation Policy will ensure that the Proceeds are used for the broader economic and community benefit of the Coffs Harbour City Local Government Area.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

KPMG were engaged to review the governance arrangements for the lease proceeds.  Costs associated with the airport lease process are being funded through reserves.

Risk Analysis:

The proposed governance arrangements, and in particular Investment Strategy, Capital Allocation Policy and Holding Structure provide a balanced and integrated approach to minimising the risks associated with investing and allocating the proceeds over the long term. Including a rule that a 75% majority of the elected Council is required to change the Capital Allocation Policy, an independent project proposal review process, project funding limits and restrictions, and project alignment to Council’s Integrated Planning and Reporting documents all strengthen the governance framework.

Consultation:

The proposed governance options and recommended arrangements have been discussed with KPMG and relevant internal stakeholders.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

·     Local Government Act 1993 Investment Order dated 12 January 2011

·     Investment Policy Guidelines dated May 2010

·     CHCC Investment Policy adopted 24 August 2017

Implementation Date / Priority:

Upon adoption of the recommendation, Council officers will draft the policies and provide a further report to Council for their consideration.

Conclusion:

KPMG have advised on appropriate governance arrangements for the Proceeds.  Based on this advice, a recommendation has been formulated and is now presented to Council for consideration and adoption.

 

 


PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


SC21/13       Planning Proposal - Application to Amend Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 To Rezone Land - Lot 1 DP 360716 & Lot 15 DP 7956, 288-294 Coramba Road, Coffs Harbour - Pre Exhibition

Author:                        Team Leader Planning & Urban Design

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      C.1 Liveable neighbourhoods with a defined identity

Attachments:              ATT1  SC21/13   Planning Proposal (No 288 to 294 Coramba Road, Coffs Harbour)

ATT2  SC21/13   Draft Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan Amendment No. 22 (288 to 294 Coramba RoadCoffs Harbour)  

      

 

 

Executive Summary

A proponent-led application has been received by Council to amend Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 2013 for Lot 1 DP 360716 and Lot 15 DP 7956 (288-294 Coramba Road) Coffs Harbour. The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement to initiate a planning proposal to amend Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 to more accurately apply environmental and residential zones and corresponding minimum lot size and terrestrial biodiversity maps at the subject land (Attachment 1). This report also seeks Council’s endorsement to amend Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan (DCP) 2015 to align with the proposed land use zones (Attachment 2).

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Endorse and forward a planning proposal to amend zone, minimum lot size and terrestrial biodiversity map layers of Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2013 at Lot 1 DP 370716 and Lot 15 DP 7956 (288-294 Coramba Road, Coffs Harbour) to NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment seeking a Gateway Determination (Attachment 1).

2.       Request that the Secretary of NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment issue written authorisation to Council to exercise delegation of the plan making functions under Section 3.36(2) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 in respect of the planning proposal.

3.       Resolve to publicly exhibit the planning proposal and undertake government agency consultation based on the Gateway Determination issued by NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment.

4.       Resolve to publicly exhibit draft Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan 2015 - Amendment No. 22 (288-294 Coramba Road Coffs Harbour) concurrently with the associated planning proposal (Attachment 2).

5.       Note that a further report will be brought back to Council for consideration following public exhibition of the planning proposal and draft Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan 2015 – Amendment No. 22.

6.       Inform the landowners of the subject land and their consultant of Council’s decision.

 

REPORT:

Description of Item:

A proponent-led application has been received by Council to amend Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 for Lot 1 DP 360716 and Lot 15 DP 7956 (288-294 Coramba Road) Coffs Harbour (‘the subject land’) to more accurately apply Zone E2 Environmental Conservation and Zone R2 Low Density Residential to the land. The proposal also includes corresponding amendments to the minimum lot size and terrestrial biodiversity maps.

The application has been subject to a peer review and has been determined to have merit as it accords with Council’s adopted Local Growth Management Strategy 2020. A planning proposal has been prepared in accordance with Section 3.33 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (‘the Act’) to initiate an amendment to Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 (Attachment 1).

This report also seeks Council’s endorsement to amend Coffs Harbour DCP 2015 to align with the proposed land use zones (Attachment 2).

·    The Subject Land

The application to amend Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 affects land at 288-294 Coramba Road, Coffs Harbour (Lot 1 DP 360716 and Lot 15 DP 7956) as shown in Figure 1. The subject land is located approximately 2.2 km west of the Coffs Harbour City Centre and is bounded by William Sharp Drive to the north, Bakers Close and Coramba Road to the west, private property to the east and Coffs Creek to the south. The subject land has an area of 1.108 hectares and is currently within Zone R2 Low Density Residential and Zone E2 Environmental Conservation under Coffs Harbour LEP 2013.

 

Figure 1 – Subject Land

 

·    Land Use Zoning

The planning proposal seeks to amend the land use zone on the north east portion of the subject land from Zone E2 Environmental Conservation to Zone R2 Low Density Residential as the land in this locality does not accord with the objectives of Zone E2 Environmental Conservation due to the absence of high ecological, scientific, cultural or aesthetic value.

The planning proposal also seeks to amend the land use zone for a very small sliver of land on the southern boundary of the subject land from Zone E2 Environmental Conservation to Zone R2 Low Density Residential to align with the new property boundary approved by Council under Development Consent 0371/20DA for a seven lot Torrens title subdivision. Existing and proposed land use zones are shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2: Existing and Proposed Land Use Zones

Issues:

Issues associated with the planning proposal are detailed in Attachment 1 and summarised as follows:

·    Environmental Values

The north east portion of the subject land is within Zone E2 Environmental Conservation under Coffs Harbour LEP 2013, as it is mapped as containing primary koala habitat, riparian land and terrestrial biodiversity. A mapping anomaly has however been identified where some of the land within Zone E2 Environmental Conservation on the north east portion of the subject land does not contain ecological, scientific, cultural or aesthetic value and thus does not meet the objectives of Zone E2 Environmental Conservation. It is therefore unlikely that critical habitat or threatened species, populations or ecological communities, or their habitats, will be adversely affected as a result of the proposed zoning change in this locality to Zone R2 Low Density Residential.

The southern portion of the subject land is also mapped as containing primary koala habitat, riparian land and terrestrial biodiversity and is within Zone E2 Environmental Conservation under Coffs Harbour LEP 2013. Development Consent 0371/20DA recently issued by Council for a seven lot Torrens title subdivision of the subject land requires most of the land within Zone E2 Environmental Conservation on the southern portion of the site to be dedicated to Council with a vegetation management plan in place. The planning proposal seeks to rezone a very small sliver of land along the southern boundary of the site to Zone R2 Low Density Residential to align with the new property boundary approved under Development Consent 0371/20DA. The impacts associated with this are negligible due to the minor area subject to the zoning change, therefore it is unlikely that critical habitat or threatened species, populations or ecological communities, or their habitats, will be adversely affected as a result of the planning proposal.

·    Flooding

Council’s spatial mapping indicates that the subject land is prone to flooding. The majority of land within the 100-year flood extent is within Zone E2 Environmental Conservation. Notwithstanding this, some of the land proposed to be within Zone R2 Low Density Residential is within the 100-year flood extent.

Flooding was adequately considered by Council as part of a recent approval to subdivide the land into seven Torrens title lots (0371/20DA). This consent contains a condition for a restriction to be placed on title of the lots under Section 88B of the Conveyancing Act 1919. The restriction on the use of land prohibits fill, earthworks, building and construction works below the 1% AEP (100 year) flood extent. Any future dwelling on lots 5, 6 and 7 must provide Council with a structural engineer’s report that certifies the structure has been designed to withstand the forces of floodwater, debris and buoyancy, up to and including the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) event.

There are adequate planning controls in place to ensure that flooding is appropriately managed as part of any future development applications (if the above development consent is not acted upon). Future development on the land must comply with Clause 7.3 of Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 and Section E4 of Coffs Harbour DCP 2015. Clause 7.3 of Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 establishes minimum floor levels for future development, whilst Section E4.2 of Coffs Harbour DCP 2015 provides that buildings are to be designed and located so that they are free from any high hazard flood areas.

·    Bushfire Prone Land

The subject land is classified as Category 1 bushfire prone land and an associated 100m buffer area. Bushfire risk has been addressed in a Bushfire Hazard Assessment Report submitted with the proponent-led application (Appendix 3 of Attachment 1). The assessment states that the concurrent seven lot residential subdivision approved on the subject land complies with the specific objectives for the proposed residential use of the land and the performance criteria for the various proposed bushfire protection measures in accordance with the NSW Government’s Planning for Bushfire Protection 2019. Future development applications for all development on the subject land will be required to comply with Section 4.14 of the Environmental Protection and Assessment Act 1979 or Section 100B of the Rural Fires Act 1997, depending on the nature of the proposed development, and the relevant provisions of Planning for Bushfire Protection 2019.

Options:

Council has a number of options available in relation to this matter. They include:

1.   Resolve to adopt the recommendations of this report.

2.   Resolve to undertake an alternative approach.

3.   Resolve not to adopt the recommendations of this report.

Option 1 is recommended as the suitable course of action.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

An assessment of environmental issues is provided in the planning proposal (Attachment 1). Environmental sustainability issues are also required to be addressed as part of any future development application should the planning proposal be initiated.

•     Social

An assessment of potential social issues is provided in the planning proposal and no detrimental impacts have been identified (Attachment 1).

•     Civic Leadership

The planning proposal is consistent with the ‘MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan’, in particular C1.2 - undertaking development that is environmentally, socially and economically responsible.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The proposed development is not expected to result in any significant broader economic implications.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The proposed amendment to Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 is a proponent-led project and therefore Council’s adopted fees and charges apply. In this regard there are no implications for Council’s Delivery Program or Operational Plan as this process is funded by the applicant.

Risk Analysis:

The planning proposal has addressed the constraints that affect the land and demonstrates that the constraints affecting the land can be managed effectively, therefore minimising associated risks (Attachment 1). This is sufficient to allow Council to support the application and initiate the planning proposal to the next stage (Gateway Determination).

Consultation:

Should Council resolve to initiate the planning proposal and a Gateway Determination is subsequently issued by NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment, the proposal is required to be exhibited in accordance with the Gateway Determination and relevant provisions of the Act. Consultation with government agencies and other stakeholders may also be required if specified within the Gateway Determination.

Consultation will be undertaken in accordance with Council’s Community Participation and Engagement Plan 2019, as follows:

Project Stage

Inform

Consult

Involve

Collaborate

Pre-lodgement Discussions

x

x

x

 

Initiate Planning Proposal

x

x

 

 

Public Exhibition

x

x

 

 

Post Exhibition Report to Council

x

x

 

 

Post Endorsement Notification

x

 

 

 

Place Score:

In early 2019, Council undertook extensive community consultation using the Place Score place-making tool. This ‘place experience’ measurement tool enabled residents and visitors within the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area to share what they most value in their neighbourhood and then to rate how their neighbourhood is performing against such values. The 2019 Place Score report was presented to Council on 11 April 2019. West Coffs received a Place Score of 64, which is well below the NSW average of 72 for liveability. One of the top liveability improvement priorities identified by the West Coffs community includes the protection of the natural environment. The proposed amendment to Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 will assist in providing housing opportunities, whilst protecting key attributes of the natural environment.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

This planning proposal has been prepared in accordance with the Act and associated regulation. A number of other relevant policies and statutory documents have been considered in the preparation of the planning proposal.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Should Council resolve to initiate the planning proposal, it will be immediately forwarded to NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment, requesting Gateway Determination. The timeframe for the completion of this planning proposal is governed by the Act and thus is determined by NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment.

Conclusion:

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement to initiate a planning proposal to amend Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 to more accurately apply environmental and residential zones and corresponding minimum lot size and terrestrial biodiversity maps at Lot 1 DP 360716 and Lot 15 DP 7956 (288-294 Coramba Road) Coffs Harbour. The proposed amendment to Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 accords with the North Coast Regional Plan 2036 and Council’s adopted Local Growth Management Strategy 2020. Sufficient planning merit for the amendment to Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 is provided within the planning proposal (Attachment 1). This report also seeks Council’s endorsement to amend Coffs Harbour DCP 2015 to align with the proposed land use zones (Attachment 2).

 


PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


PDF Creator 


NOM21/05   Woolgoolga Public School - Parking & Drop Off Areas

Attachments:          Nil

 

Motion:

Councillor Arkan has given notice of his intention to move the following:

"That Council investigate and bring back a report, looking at and providing options for parking and "children drop off areas” at Woolgoolga PS. The report to mention and investigate the use of Beach Street alongside the centennial park, as a spot for the buses to drop and pick up. 

This would reduce the entanglement of cars, parents, buses, children in Scarborough Street.

As I understand the buses currently come along Beach Street, to turn into Scarborough street. 

There may be need for a shelter to be built by council as a safe sheltered space on the Beach Street entrance. Or a even an extended veranda set up to the existing sports shed accessed from Beach Street."

 

Rationale:

“Currently all bus drop offs and parent drop off points occur in Scarborough Street. 

They are intertwined. Meaning buses park along side the school front entrance and parents cars park a bit further up the road on both sides. 

There is a pedestrian crossing, which is manned by the principal and other teaching staff in the afternoons. 

There are parents cars parked in Scarborough Street, Hastings Street, Short Street just to mention a few near by streets. 

Its very dangerous and reaching a point to look for alternative measures.”

Staff Comment:

An investigation can be carried out and subsequent report can be provided to a future Council Meeting.

 

 


NOM21/06   Robin Street Parking

Attachments:          Nil

 

Motion:

Councillor Arkan has given notice of his intention to move the following:

"That Council present a report outlining possible remedies for car parking, in Robin Street in and around Naranga PS. The report to include/but not  limited to, investigate purchasing land across from the School to be used as a parking area"

 

Rationale:

“Safety of parents and school children is important. Cars are being parked on lawns and in no particular safe order. 

Its an ongoing problem. It has recently come to my notice that there maybe land (1000sq) available for sale, which if useable and viable may assist in providing a solution to parking and safety concerns.”

Staff Comment:

An investigation can be carried out and subsequent report can be provided to a future Council meeting.

 

 

 


SI21/04         New Alcohol Prohibited Reserve - Brian Navin Reserve, Columbus Street, Coffs Harbour

Author:                        Building and Open Spaces Strategist

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

MyCoffs:                      A.2 An active, safe and healthy community

Attachments:              ATT1  SI21/04    CONFIDENTIAL Coffs Clarence Area Command Audit - Brian Navin Reserve

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(e) of the Local Government Act as it contains information that would, if disclosed, prejudice the maintenance of law.

ATT2  SI21/04    CONFIDENTIAL Public Submissions for the Proposed Alcohol Prohibited Area: Brian Navin Reserve, Columbus Street, Coffs Harbour   

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This report requests formal approval for the installation of a 24-hour alcohol prohibition area (APA) in Brian Navin Reserve, Columbus Street, Coffs Harbour. There are two existing alcohol prohibition signs on the site, but no record of a Council resolution supporting the ruling. The purpose of the implementation of 24-hour prohibition is to reduce criminal behaviour in the Park.

Coffs Clarence Command have conducted a Community Safety Audit of the Brian Navin Reserve in response to a number of anti-social behaviour incidents and complaints from nearby residents. They determined most incidents are related to alcohol intoxication, generally occurring during daylight hours.

The Park is situated between Park Beach Plaza and Park Beach Road with access East to Columbus Street / San Francisco Avenue and is frequented by pedestrians travelling between the retail venues and nearby residential housing. 

Council advertised the proposition to install the APA from 6 February to 5 March 2021. The “Have Your Say” page recorded 30 visits, with two responses recorded in favour of the prohibition (see attached).  Park Beach Plaza, the Local Aboriginal Land Council, the Coffs Coast Liquor Accord, and Northside Shopping Centre, were contacted via email, but there were no responses.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Install a 24-hour alcohol prohibition for Brian Navin Reserve, Columbus Circuit, Coffs Harbour pursuant to Section 632A of the Local Government Act 1993 (LGA)

2.       Provide formal notification of the Alcohol Prohibited Area, in accordance with s632A of the Local Government Act and then sign post the reserves accordingly.

Report

Description of Item:

The Reserve is situated adjacent to Park Beach Plaza and is used as a pedestrian walkway to Park Beach Road and Columbus Court / San Francisco Avenue. Pedestrian entry to the reserve includes Northside Lane, Columbus Court, and Park Beach Road to the south, and path connections to the Park Beach Plaza to the north and east.  These pathways provide access from residential homes and holiday units to the shopping centre.  Two seat spots are located in tree shaded locations within the central area of the reserve, providing rest spots for general park users.

Council continues to receive complaints in relation to anti-social behaviour in Brian Navin Reserve. The behaviour is of concern to adjacent residences and passers-by, including staff from the shopping centres, some of whom report feeling unsafe. The Police recorded 67 anti-social incidents on the Reserve in 2020. This behaviour is not conducive to creating a safe and inviting atmosphere within a primarily residential area.

An audit conducted by Coffs Clarence Local Area Command Audit recommends a number of actions including the implementation of a 24-hour APA for Brian Navin Reserve. Despite some existing signage, a Council resolution approving the APA on the Reserve could not be sourced.

 

Brian Navin Reserve

Northside Lane                       Park Beach Lane

Issues:

Coffs Clarence Local Area Command completed an audit of the reserve. They identified a number of safety related issues within the Reserve:

1.    Groups of people gather on the reserve to drink alcohol, mostly in daylight hours. There were areas where fires had been lit and a number of discarded alcohol receptacles.

2.    Brian Navin Park is not well maintained and has a variety of large trees and plants towards the southern end which offer opportunities for concealment for offenders.

3.    The users of the space through the day are predominantly locals however at night consist of the residents from the nearby housing units.

4.    There are two (2) existing Council signs which indicate prohibited and permitted activities on the Reserve but the alcohol restrictions are not well signposted.

The full audit is attached to this report.

Enforcement of APAs is the responsibility of the NSW Police. Initiating a 24-hour APA empowers Police to manage alcohol related anti-social behaviour with little impact on other park users.   The Coffs Clarence Local Area Command have indicated that once the prohibitions are in place they will conduct additional patrols within the known problem areas to reinforce the prohibition and effect a change in behaviour.

Options:

1.    Adopt the recommendations and install a 24 hour APA in Brian Navin Reserve

2.    Modify the recommendation and adopt the process as a 12-month trial on a temporary basis and reassess Council’s position at the end of the trial.

3.    Reject the recommendation. However, failure to implement the 24-hour prohibition, given the current concerns, may see an increase in the incidence of anti-social behaviour with subsequent negative impacts on the local community.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

No negative environmental concerns will occur as a result of the amended alcohol controls.  Positive benefits will ensue, as alcohol related broken glass is of particular concern to reserve users and requires regular removal by maintenance staff and locals.  While the police audit recommends reduction of vegetation, this will require further investigation to ensure environmental impacts are considered.

•     Social

Alcohol prohibition encourages more use of the Reserve which will in turn increase the safety and amenity of the area. The signs will provide Police with the power to confiscate or dispose of alcoholic drinks consumed by Reserve users.

Council’s current procedures allow Council to suspend an APA in parks and reserves at the administrative level on request.

•     Civic Leadership

This proposal works towards achieving the outcomes identified within the MyCoffs Strategic Plan and is directly connected to the themes of:

-     A.2 An active safe, healthy community and

-     C.1 Liveable neighbourhoods with a defined identity.

These areas are identified as outcomes/objectives in the Community Strategic Plan and Council is specified as both provider and facilitator and additionally, in the case of safe communities, an advocate.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Improving the safety and amenity in the Reserve will benefit the adjacent retail and service areas, particularly encouraging more active transport options from nearby residential areas.

•      Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The cost of notifications and installing notices will be absorbed within current programs.

Risk Analysis:

There is a likelihood of an increase in alcohol-fuelled violence, anti-social behaviour, and possibly, an increase risk of assault and malicious damage in the area if controls are not in place. This would impact negatively on the Park Beach community and retail trade. An APA would empower Police to confiscate or dispose of alcoholic drinks.

The Reserve is not generally used for public events, so it is unlikely that there would be objections to the APA from community groups. Community consultation indicates some community interest in favour of the APA and no objections.

Consultation:

The consultation was triggered by a complaint from a resident, and the safety audit conducted by the Coffs Clarence Local Area Command. 

The information was displayed on Council’s Have Your Say page for 30 days with a direct link to the online mapping tool. Council notified the Coffs Harbour & District Local Aboriginal Lands Council, Coffs Coast Liquor Accord, Park Beach Plaza and Northside Shopping Centre.

This report addresses the regulatory requirements for the Reserve. Council will consider the recommendations in the Police Audit in consultation with the local community.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Local Government Act 1993 – Sec 632A Confiscation of Alcohol in certain public and other places

Implementation Date / Priority:

Sec 632A refers to the Office of Local Government Ministerial Guidelines on Alcohol Guidelines for the correct implementation procedure.

The Guidelines state that a council must publicly advise the establishment of an alcohol-free zone by notice published in a newspaper circulating in the area that includes the zone. An alcohol-free zone will not operate until 7 days after publication of the notice and until the areas affected are adequately signposted. Council is required to consult with the police regarding the placement of signs. As a minimum, signs are to be placed at the outer limits of the zone, at the site of specific trouble spots (as indicated by the police) and at other suitable intervals within the zone.

Conclusion:

It is recommended, for Councillors’ consideration, that implementation of a 24-hour APA within the Brian Navin Reserve will provide a deterrent to anti-social behaviour and support the Police in reducing alcohol related crime, improving the safety and amenity of the precinct for the local community, retailers and visitors to the region.

 

 

 


SI21/05         Status Update - House Sewer Connection Inflow Strategy

Author:                        Group Leader Infrastructure Construction and Maintenance

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

MyCoffs:                      C.2 A natural environment sustained for the future

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

Council adopted the House Sewer Connection Inflow Strategy in 2019 as Council Resolution 2019/12.  The purpose of this report is to respond to a direction in Council’s initial 2019 resolution to provide an update on the implementation of the strategy after its first year of operation.

During wet weather, inflow into Council’s sewerage system is increased by illegal stormwater connections and can be more than double what the system’s actual capacity.  This additional inflow results in an increased frequency of sewer overflows into the environment, an increased frequency of sewer surcharging into properties, and significant increases in transport (pumping) and treatment costs.

Work completed to date under the House Sewer Connection Inflow Strategy has identified more than 700 defects including 17 direct roof to sewer connections.  The 17 direct roof connections, which represent <2% of the ~1000 properties tested in this first round, were found to be contributing more that 50% of the sewerage systems design capacity.

 

Recommendation:

That Council note the progress of the House Sewer Connection Strategy to reduce stormwater inflow to the sewer.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Council adopted the House Sewer Connection Inflow Strategy in 2019.  The purpose of the strategy is to reduce stormwater inflow into the sewer from illegal house service connections.

During wet weather, inflow into Council’s sewerage system is bolstered by illegal stormwater connections and can be more than double what the system was designed to receive.  This additional inflow results in an increased frequency of overflows to the environment, an increased frequency of sewer surcharging into properties, and significant increases in transport (pumping) and treatment costs.

Strategy Implementation to Date

There are 120 distinct sewer catchments across the Coffs Harbour LGA.  The majority of these catchments gravitate to Sewer Pumping Stations before being pumped to Council’s Water Reclamation Plants.  A detailed prioritisation assessment was undertaken by staff to determine which catchments were incurring the highest rate of illegal stormwater connections.  This prioritisation allowed staff to ensure Council resources were efficiently deployed and the worst affected portions of the LGA to be addressed first.

The prioritisation primarily assessed the ratio of dry weather to wet weather inflows across individual catchments; the larger the ratio, the higher the priority. Figure 1 below shows an example flow assessment which led to selection of the first ten catchments to be tested.

Figure 1 Wet to Dry Flow Ratio Hydrograph. Blue column represent rainfall during a storm event and the coloured lines represent each individual Pumping Stations ratio of dry weather to wet weather inflow.

Despite an open tender process commencing in September 2019 to appoint an inspection and testing Contractor, field works were unable to commence until September 2020.  A summary of the reasons for delay is provided below:

-      September 2019 - A contract was put to open tender for a smoke testing contractor to undertake the testing on behalf of Council.

-      December 2019 - The preferred contractor was selected but due to a change in the GM’s delegation, Council was required to approve contract award at the next available Council Meeting.  This occurred in February 2020.

-      March 2020 - Contractor was due to commence testing but had to be deferred due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

-      June 2020 - Contractor was due to commence testing which was then cancelled when Queensland closed its border to NSW as part of Covid-19 control measures.

Between September and November 2020, approximately 1000 properties across ten (of a total of 120) catchments were tested.

Summary of inspection findings

A summary of the testing performed and defects found is show below in Table 1 with Figure 2, 3 and 4 showing smoke testing in progress.

 

Defect Summary

Total Number of Properties Tested

978

Number of Properties with Defects

542

Total Number of Defects Found

709

Direct Stormwater Connections to Sewer

17

Low or broken Overflow Relief Gully and/or Inspection Openings

260

Inspection Opening unable to be found

189

Overflow Relief Gully unable to be found

103

Other minor defects

140

Table 1 Defect Count Summary

 

Line Callout 2: Smoke correctly exiting high level vent

Line Callout 2: Smoke existing floor drain indicating illegal connection to sewer

 

Line Callout 2: Smoke existing gutters indicates connection to sewer

Figure 2, 3 & 4 Smoke Testing in Progress

Analysis of strategy effectiveness

Water Services Association Australia (WSAA) is the peak industry body for the urban water industry in Australia and provides best practice guidelines, standards and codes for all aspects of water and sewer system design.

Using the WSAA guidelines for sewer design, the theoretical inflow of the ~1000 tested properties was calculated and assessed against the inflow from the 17 direct stormwater connections.  Both the theoretical loading and the inflow from direct connections were calculated using a 1 in 6-month storm event of 1 hour duration (29.6 mm).

The WSAA sewer design loading for the catchments tested is 25 L/s. During the same storm event, inflow from the 17 properties with direct stormwater connections contributes 13 L/s into the sewer.

In summary, the 17 houses with direct stormwater connections to sewer account for 52% of the sewer capacity. Or put another way, 1.7% of properties take 52% of the network capacity during a storm.  This is depicted visually in 4 & 5 below.

Figure 4 & 5 Direct Stormwater Connections and Capacity of Network from Phase 1 testing

The above assessment is conservative as it is based on the 17 direct connections only. In practice, more stormwater will be entering the sewer system from the other less significant defects that were not individually quantified.  As shown in Table 1, 260 x low overflow relief gullies and low or broken inspection openings were identified and can be expected to add significant further load on the sewer.

If the findings to date are indicative of the LGA as a whole, then a continued effort to identify and eliminate direct stormwater connections to the City’s sewer system has the potential to:

-      return more than 50% of sewer capacity during storm events;

-      reduce the peak pumping and treatment volumes by the equivalent of half an Olympic swimming pool an hour;

-      provide significant reduction in pumping energy costs, chemical usage, and treatment costs;

-      significantly reduce the volume of effluent discharged to the environment via overflows; and

-      enable the deferment, or in the alternative, reduced the size and cost of future major capital upgrades at pump stations and the water reclamation plants.

Issues:

There are no issues associated with this report.

Options:

As this report is for noting only, no options analysis is required.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Removal of the direct connections identified in Phase 1 will return (approximately) 52% of the sewer design capacity during a 1 in 6-month one hour storm event, significantly reducing the likelihood of environmental harm through sewage overflows.

The reduced inflow will also reduce the volume of effluent discharged to the environment and via the Deep Sea Release, and will significantly reduce the amounts of energy and chemicals consumed throughout the treatment process.

The achievement of these anticipated outcomes of the strategy is validated by the early results.

•     Social

The same network overflows that are harmful to the environment also have the potential to create public health impacts.  Early inspection results indicate the frequency and severity of overflows will be reduced through the continued implementation of this strategy.

•     Civic Leadership

Through implementation of the House Sewer Connection Strategy, Council demonstrates a strategic approach to the operation of its sewerage infrastructure, ensuring it achieves the maximum benefit to the wider community.

This approach is consistent with the following MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan objectives;

-    A2.4 We cultivate a safe community

-    C2.1 We protect the diversity of our natural environment

-    D2.1 We effectively manage the planning and provision of regional public services and infrastructure

-    D2.2 We collaborate to achieve the best possible future for all the Coffs Harbour area

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Reduced operating cost and deferred capital expenditure (as outlined below) will ultimately yield lower sewer rates in the future than would otherie be required

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Delivery Program

Council’s draft Sewer Reclamation Plant Strategy forecasts future capital upgrades being required at Coffs WRP in 2032 at a cost of $70m, Woolgoolga WRP in 2035 at a cost of $50m and Moonee WRP in 2051 at a cost of $8m.  The primary driver for these upgrades is increased stormwater inflow from residential growth within the LGA.

A reduction of wet weather stormwater inflows through the continued implementation of the House Sewer Connection Inflow Strategy will enable Council to maximum it’s deferment of both these upgrades and associated upgrades within Sewer reticulation network (sewer mains, pump stations, etc.).

Operational Plan

The strategy is, and will continue to yield a significant reduction in transportation (pumping) and treatment costs.

Reducing stormwater ingress to sewer by 50% will reduce the associated energy costs of wet weather pumping and treatment proportionally.  It is conservatively estimated that annual power and chemical cost savings in the order of $100k per year will be achieved through the continued implementation of the strategy, this estimate could be higher depending on the frequency and duration of rain events.

Risk Analysis:

There are no risks associated with this report.

Consultation:

Council adopted the House Sewer Connection Inflow Strategy in 2019 (2019/12).  A detailed communication strategy was developed by Council staff which aims to inform the broader community of the program and notify affected property owners of works which might impact their properties.  Additional information can be found on Council’s Have Your Say page.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Nil.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Ongoing.

Conclusion:

Council adopted the House Sewer Connection Inflow Strategy in 2019, and the program is ongoing.  Works to date have validated the original basis for the strategy (i.e. a high number of defecting connections) and engineering analysis of results to date has confirmed the desired outcomes of the Strategy are being achieved (i.e. a significant reduction of wet weather inflow to the sewer).

 

 

 

 


SI21/06         Local Roads and Community Infrastructure Grant

Author:                        Director Sustainable Infrastructure

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

MyCoffs:                      D.2 We have effective use of public resources.

Attachments:              ATT1  SI21/06    Letter from Hon Kevin Hogan, MP in regards to Local Road and Community Infrastructure Program  

 

Executive Summary

Council received notification in October 2020 of an extension to the Local Roads and Community Infrastructure Program (LRCI) – Phase 2. The Regional Botanic Gardens Glasshouse and North Wall Car Park projects are currently underway funded by Phase 1 of the LRCI funding. Council now has the opportunity of initiating a further suite of projects utilising offered LRCI Round 2 funding.

Allocations to councils from the funding body have been calculated using a similar formula to Phase 1 of the LRCIP, which have resulted in an offer of a further $2,952,765 to Coffs Harbour City Council. The program invites Council to nominate projects at any time between now and 31 July 2021. Following the funding body’s approval of a draft work schedule for each nominated project, Council may commence the projects. There is a very short delivery timeframe in which projects are required to be physically complete by 31 December 2021.

This report presents, for Council’s consideration and adoption, a list of recommended projects for second round funding offered by the LRCI Program.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.    Note the offered Local Roads and Community Infrastructure grant funding of $2,952,765 from the Australian Government.

2.    Note the receipt of a Crown Reserves Infrastructure Fund grant of $543,000 as additional funding for the NCRBG Glasshouse Project.

3.    Note the additional contribution of $100,000 from the Friends of the Botanic Gardens as additional funding for the NCRBG Glasshouse Project.

4.    Allocate the following amounts for the following purposes to be reflected in the March Quarterly Budget Review Statement:

4.1.    $1,600,000 for the Vost Street Netball Courts Renewal Project;

4.2.    $700,000 for the Moonee Cycleway Project;

4.3.    $800,000 for the Orchid Road and The Boulevade Drainage Project;

4.4.    An additional amount of $495,765 for the NCRBG Glasshouse Project comprised as follows:

4.4.1.     $543,000 additional funding from the Crown Reserves Improvement Fund;

4.4.2.     $100,000 additional funding from the contribution from the Friends of the North Coast Regional Botanic Garden;

4.4.3.     $147,235 reduction in the previously allocated amount of Council funding for the NCRBG Glasshouse Project, such amount to be redirected to the projects listed in 4.1- 4.3 above.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Council has been offered an amount of $2,952,765 in Local Roads and Community Infrastructure (LRCI) grant funding by the Australian Government. The intended outcomes of the LRCI Program are to:

·     Provide stimulus to protect and create local short-term employment opportunities through funding construction projects following the impacts of COVID-19;

·     Deliver benefits to communities, such as improved road safety, accessibility and visual amenity.

Of particular note is the requirement that any project which Council nominates must be over and above Council’s existing approved capital budget for FY2021 - 2022. Business as usual projects or those already included in the existing Operating Plan are ineligible.

Staff have compiled a list of prioritised projects which they recommend as strong candidates for this funding and which meet the LRCI program guidelines. Considering the criticality of the projects, the short delivery timeframe required, and the amount of funding, the following projects are recommended as most suitable for adoption by Council:

1.    Vost St Netball Courts, Coffs Harbour

2.    Moonee Cycleway, Moonee Beach to Sapphire Beach

3.    Orchid Road and the Boulevarde Drainage, Mullaway

 

Detail of the Recommended Projects:

Vost Street Netball Renewal Project.

·     Project Description - A renewal/upgrade project to reinstate high quality playing surfaces at the existing netball facility in Vost Street. Total Project Cost is $1,800,000. Council has already allocated $200,000. The requested funding allocation from the LRCI Program is $1,600,000.

·     Project Scope – Deconstruction of existing surfaces and bases; new sub-base material laid and compacted; installation of subsoil drains; new asphalt pavement; acrylic surface over asphalt; installation of upgraded stormwater connections; new goal posts; new court line marking; removal of old light poles and installation of new light poles and lamps. New court layout to be compliant with current Netball Standards.

·     Rationale – The project is not currently listed in Council’s Operational Plan. The existing court surface is very uneven and degraded. Two courts are already unplayable and the remaining courts will be unplayable soon. Without renewal the poor court condition will ultimately require the facility to be closed for use. The facility is classified as the LGA’s regional facility for netball in the 2016 Sport Facility Plan. The project will enable a continued provision of netball serviced for local district and representative teams. The new courts will deliver compliant court separations (the existing courts were built a long ago and have noncompliant court perimeters. The project was part funded by Council ($200,000 of a required total of $1,800,000) and is awaiting appropriate grant funding before proceeding.

 

Moonee Cycleway Project

·     Project Description – A new capital project to create a footpath and cycleway connection between the new release areas of the Sapphire and Moonee development precinct. Total Project Cost is $1,400,000. Council has already allocated $700,000. The requested funding allocation from the LRCI Program is $700,000.

·     Project Scope – Placement of a 2.5m wide footpath/cycleway. A significant proportion of the additional funding is dedicated to crossing a gully via the Highway corridor with additional controls such as steel wire rope.

·     Rationale – The project is not currently listed in Council’s Operational Plan. The project was part funded by Council ($700,000 of a required total of $1,400,000) and is awaiting appropriate grant funding before proceeding. Design and consultation is complete and the project is ready to build. This project is listed in the Moonee Beach Development Control Plan. The Sapphire Beach precinct is now fully developed and significant development work is underway in the final sections of the Moonee precinct.

 

Orchid Road and The Boulevade Drainage Project.

·     Project Description – A capital upgrade project to effectively deal with road and related drainage issues. Total Project Cost is $1,300,000. Council has already allocated $500,000. The requested funding allocation from the LRCI Program is $800,000.

·     Project Scope - Removal and replacement of existing road pavements; removal and replacement of road surfacing; new kerb and gutter; new pits and pipe drainage; improved subsurface drainage lines; Improved foundations for pavement and reconstructed driveways.

·     Rationale – The project is not currently listed in Council’s Operational Plan. The project was part funded by Council ($500,000 of a required total of $1,300,000) and is awaiting appropriate grant funding before proceeding. The area suffers from poor drainage due to its existing topography and lack of formed systems. Existing drainage conditions are linked to the engineering standards/expectations of the era which relied heavily on no kerb or gutter and drainage via open swales.

Issues:

Funding the Recommended Plan

The LRCI Program has provided $2,952,765 in funding which is available for distribution to the nominated projects listed above. The requested allocations discussed above total $3,100,000 leaving a funding gap of $147,235 to be found from other sources.

 

Recommended Source of Funds for the Gap ($147,235)

The NCRBG Glasshouse Project has recently received an unexpected additional injection of funds via a NSW Government Grant (via the CRIF pathway). The additional funding allows Council the opportunity to consider a reallocation of some of its previous NCRBG funding as described below.

 

The currently in-progress NCRBG Glasshouse Renewal Project was originally funded and commenced with a total budget of:

 

Australian Government Grant

$782,096

Council Allocated Funds

$312,834

Friends of the NCRBG

$100,000

Total

$1,194,930

 

A further NSW Government grant has recently been received for the NCRBG Project. This further grant opportunity provides an additional $543,000. The additional funding from this source, if accepted by Council, will allow for a range of additional and valuable ancillary works to be added to the original (current) scope of the NCRBG Project including for example additional connecting pathways, external paving, etc.

The opportunity also enables Council to reallocate $147,235 of its original $312,834 contribution for the NCRBG Project to other purposes.

It is proposed therefore that Council accept the additional NSW Government grant funding of $543,000 offered for the NCRBG Glasshouse Project and, concurrently, transfer an amount of $147,235 from the NCRBG Project in order to create a total funding pool of $3,100,000 ($2,952,765 + $147,235) for the purposes of funding the recommended projects: Vost St Netball Courts Project ($1,600,000); Moonee Cycleway Project ($700,000) and Orchid Road and the Boulevarde Drainage Project ($800,000).

If adopted, the recommendations above will:

 

1.    Create a new and increased NCRBG Project scope and budget of:

Australian Government Grant

$782,096

 

NSW Government Grant

$543,000

 

Council Allocated Funds

$165,599

(reduced by $147,235 from original $312,834)

Friends of the NCRBG

$100,000

 

Total

$1,590,695

 

 

2.    Fill the minor funding gap to enable the full funding requirement of $3,100,000 for the three recommended LRCI Program projects of Vost St Netball Courts Project ($1,600,000); Moonee Cycleway Project ($700,000) and Orchid Road and the Boulevarde Drainage Project ($800,000).

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Council will conduct an environmental assessment under Part V of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 as a routine part of the planning process.

•     Social

Netball is one of the most popular sports in Australia with many female participants. The promotion of sport for teenagers and particularly women is a priority for their physical health and other benefits such as confidence, self-esteem, team-work, communication, social skills, leadership, goal-setting and resilience. As such, it is important to maintain appropriate district facilities in good order.

The installation of the off-road cycleway connecting Moonee Beach to Sapphire Beach was part of the plan agreed between the Roads and Maritime Services and Council to provide a continuous cycleway connection from Sapphire to Woolgoolga in conjunction with the Pacific Highway upgrade. The path will provide safe off-road access for cyclists and pedestrians in both suburbs, for recreation, exercise and an active transport link to the services provided at Moonee shopping precinct.

Orchid Road and The Bouevarde at Mullaway both lack a usable road verge and convey stormwater drainage via open drains at present. The drains and surrounding land are flat resulting in water pooling in the open drains – creating a breeding ground for mosquitoes. The project will improve the amenity of the street and increase the level of safety for residents.

•     Civic Leadership

This proposal works towards achieving the outcomes identified within the MyCoffs Strategic Plan and is directly connected to the themes of:

·    D.2 We effectively manage the planning and provision of regional public services and infrastructure

Our public infrastructure is maintained for its current purpose and for future generations.

These areas are identified as outcomes/objectives in the Community Strategic Plan and Council is specified as both provider, partner and advocate.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

An upgraded district netball facility will enable regional tournaments attracting visitors to the area.

The Moonee Street cycleway is an attractive feature for visitors and families, with improved access to the Moonee Market.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The nominated projects are over and above Council’s existing approved capital budget for FY2021 – 2022 to comply with the funding guidelines. Business as usual projects or those already included in the existing Operational Plan are ineligible. The projects would not be delivered without this additional funding.

Risk Analysis:

The projects are required to be completed by December 2021 to qualify for the funding. The nominated projects are “shovel-ready” or, in the case of the Vost Street netball courts will be delivered by a specialist contractor. The projects were prioritised with the grant program’s funding guidelines in mind to allow best value for the money and timely delivery within the limitations of the grant program.

Early nomination of the projects following Council approval will allow a realistic timeline to deliver the projects. The Australian Government offer is a valuable opportunity to supplement Council’s Operational Plan allowing the unexpected but welcome delivery of three high priority projects.

Consultation:

Council recently met with the NSW Netball Association, and have been collaborating with the local Netball Association to develop the plans for the courts. The project is also included in the Sports Facility Plan (2016). The plan was developed in 2009 through a series of community forums and consultation and has set the direction for the community and Council since its inception. It was updated in 2013 and 2016.

The Moonee Cycleway is listed in the Moonee Beach Contributions Plan which followed a process of community consultation. Council is regularly contacted by residents requesting completion of the pathway.

 

Orchid Road and The Boulevard drainage was requested by the residents of these streets.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Works for the North Coast Regional Botanic Glass house and the Jetty North Wall carpark are underway funded by phase 1 of the LRCI grant.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Projects to be nominated following Council approval, and planning to commence pending Federal Government approval.

Conclusion:

The LRCI funding is a much welcome financial boost which will enable three (3) merit worthy and high priority projects to be delivered by 31 December 2021.

 

 


PDF Creator