Coffs Harbour City Council

03 July 2019

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

The above meeting will be held in the Council Administration Building

Cnr Coff and Castle Streets, Coffs Harbour on:

 

Thursday, 11 July 2019

 

The meeting commences at 5.00pm and your attendance is requested.

 

 

AGENDA

 

1.         Opening of Ordinary Meeting

2.         Acknowledgment of Country

3.         Public Forum

4.         Disclosure of Interest

5.         Apologies

6.         Leaves of Absence

7.         Mayoral Minute

8.         Confirmation of Minutes

9.         Rescission Motion

10.      Notices of Motion – General

11.      General Manager’s Reports

12.      Notices of Motion – Business Services

13.      Directorate Reports – Business Services

14.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Communities

15.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Communities

16.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Infrastructure

17.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Infrastructure

18.      Questions On Notice

19.      Matters of an Urgent Nature

20.      Consideration of Confidential Items (if any)

21.      Close of Ordinary Meeting.

 

 

Steve  McGrath

General Manager

 

 


Order of Business

 

  

General Manager's Reports

GM19/18         Progression of the Cultural and Civic Space Project..................... 3

GM19/19         Council Policy - Submissions Policy........................................................ 168

Notices of Motion Business Services

NOM19/05      Updating Coffs Harbour City Council Vehicles................................ 179  

Questions on Notice

QON19/02      Odour Levels - Waste Facility.................................................................... 180  


GM19/18      Progression of the Cultural and Civic Space Project

Author:                        Strategic Projects Officer

Authoriser:                  General Manager

MyCoffs:                      B.2 A community achieving its potential

Attachments:              ATT1  GM19/18  All Welcome Schematic SSDA Design Summary

ATT2  GM19/18  All Welcome Schematic SSDA Design Report

ATT3  GM19/18  Ground Level Floor Plan

ATT4  GM19/18  Level 1 Floor Plan

ATT5  GM19/18  Level 2 Floor Plan

ATT6  GM19/18  Level 3 Floor Plan

ATT7  GM19/18  Level 4 Floor Plan

ATT8  GM19/18  Level 5 Floor Plan

ATT9  GM19/18  Level 6 Floor Plan

ATT10 GM19/18  Basement Level Floor Plan

ATT11 GM19/18  Programme

ATT12 GM19/18  CCS Project Stakeholder Engagement Report

ATT13 GM19/18  CCS Project Stakeholder Engagement Appendices

ATT14 GM19/18  CONFIDENTIAL Cost Plan

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(c),(d)(i) of the Local Government Act as it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business, and commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.

ATT15 GM19/18  CONFIDENTIAL Property Valuation Summaries   

 

Executive Summary

This report has been prepared to enable Council to consider progression of the Cultural and Civic Space (CCS) Project to detailed design and construction.  Over the 2018/19 year, the following key activities have been undertaken:

 

1.    Schematic Design to develop the exterior form of the building, the layout of functional areas within the building (library, gallery, museum, café, administration office, etc) and to start the engineering design of the structure and services within the building;

2.    Drafting of development application documentation for the State Significant Development process;

3.    Refinement of the project cost estimate based on Schematic Design; and

4.    Continued engagement of internal and external stakeholders.

 

In summary, those key activities have resulted in the following:

 

1.    A Schematic Design that satisfies the design brief provided by Council to BVN Architecture and the design team;

2.    Development application documentation prepared by planners, GeoLINK, and ready for submission to the Department of Planning & Environment;

3.    A cost estimate for the project developed by quantity surveyors, Slattery, that is within Council’s project budget expectations of $76.52m (as established at the Council meeting of 14 June 2018);

4.    A Schematic Design campaign in May 2019 that resulted in 78 written submissions. Overall written feedback was 51% positive and supportive of the project, 23% neutral, suggestions or unrelated & 26% opposed to the project in part or its entirety.

5.    Refinement of the procurement approach for Design & Construction with 2 stage early contractor engagement.

 

Recommendation:

That Council Authorise progression of the Cultural & Civic Space Project to detailed design and construction including:

1.   Approval of full project funding at $76,520,000 with expenditure expected between 2018/19 and 2022/23;

2.   Noting that a development application will be lodged which is categorised as State Significant Development under section 4.36 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979;

3.   Authorising the disposal of the following properties through an expression of interest process and for a sale price of no less than the independent valuation less 10%:

3.1.       Administration Building, 2 Castle St, Coffs Harbour (Lot 2 Sec DP 566885, Lot 1 Sec DP 566855, Lot 8 Sec 6 DP 758258),

3.2.       Rigby House, 27-29 Duke Street Coffs Harbour (Lot 110 Sec DP 777398),

3.3.       169-171 Rose Ave, Coffs Harbour (Lot 100 Sec DP 861850)

3.4.       Museum, 215A Harbour Drive, Coffs Harbour (Lot 101 Sec DP 1041655);

4.   Authorising the preparation and execution of Contracts for Sale and any other necessary documents under the Common Seal of Council;

5.   Endorsing the revised method of procurement for the builder as “Design & Construction with 2 Stage Early Contractor Engagement”; and

6.   Noting that a report will be provided to Council as soon as possible outlining the procurement steps to engage the design team going forward.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Council’s aspiration to deliver a new cultural facility for the community has been carefully considered over many years.  Key decision points to-date are summarised below.

 

Council meeting

Consideration summary

26 November 2015

·    Commence detailed facility research and concept planning required for an expanded Harry Bailey Memorial Library and Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery facilities

 

23 June

2016

·    23-31 Gordon St site endorsed

·    Trigger precinct analysis including activation opportunities and walkability

·    Trigger mixed use analysis including Council offices consistent with CBD master plan

 

11 May

2017

·    Scope of the Cultural and Civic Space project to include a new central library, regional gallery, customer service area, Council Chambers and Council staff office accommodation

·    Regional Museum and other Council assets to be considered

·    Adoption of the Library/Gallery Precinct Analysis and updates to the City Centre Masterplan accordingly

 

14 June

2018

·    Progress the Cultural and Civic Space project to its next design phase, Schematic Design, and include the Museum in scope

·    Project budget established at $76.52m

·    Resources to be applied to expedite the project

 

13 September 2018

·    Establish $2m budget (as part of the $76.52m budget) to expedite the project and complete Schematic Design within the 2018/19 year

·    Endorsement of method of procurement “Construction Management with 2 Stage Early Contractor Involvement” for the building contractor

·    Note that commitment of full project funds by Council would be required once Schematic Design is completed and before the Development Application is submitted

·    Note that the method of procurement facilitates timing of Council asset sales

·    Endorse the pursuit of grant opportunities to offset project costs

 

Issues:

Project Status and Performance

 

The project is progressing within Council’s project budget expectations of $76.52m and is forecast to continue to do so.

 

The Schematic Design phase of the project has been undertaken during the 2018/19 year within the approved $2m funding allocation and has delivered all of the material required to enable Council to make an informed decision about progression of the project.  There has been no expenditure of contingency funds to-date.  The table below shows a summary of 2018/19 committed contracts and expenditure.

 

Consultant Fees

$1,835,420

Collateral, media & Project Office

$141,756

Total

$1,977,176

 

It should be noted that the $1,977,176 expenditure in 2018/19 is part of the overall expected spend of $76.52M.

 

The Schematic Design phase has taken 2 months longer than forecast when Council last considered the project (Council meeting 13 September 2018), primarily due to time taken to procure the services of over 20 consultancies.  It should be noted that should this report be considered in the affirmative, the forecast completion of this project is delayed a few months with a forecast to commence demolition / early works in January 2020, commence construction in May 2020 and complete construction mid 2022.  (Attachment 11)

 

Schematic Design Summary

 

This summary covers the work of BVN Architecture in terms of their dual role as Architect and as Lead Design Consultant (LDC).  BVN has designed the building to satisfy the brief from Council and, as LDC, has coordinated the design inputs of a multitude of specialist design firms.  The Schematic Design body of work is summarised below.

 

All Welcome has been adopted by the design team as a working name for the building and is used throughout this report.  The working name encapsulates the design themes and principles of the project.

 

Architect Summary.  The building design has satisfied the design brief specified by Council.  The design has been exhibited to the community and is covered at a high level in BVN’s summary report (Attachment 1) and detailed in BVN’s Schematic Design report (Attachment 2) and floor plans (Attachments 3 to 10).  Community feedback is addressed in the Consultation section of this Council Report.

 

 

Building Services & Sustainability.  LCI Consultants have completed the schematic designs for All Welcome’s mechanical, electrical, IT & communications, vertical transport, hydraulic, and fire protection services.  Notwithstanding a small number of outstanding items, the design is coordinated to a schematic design standard with the other design disciplines.  The following items are yet to be captured in the services design and require investigation at the next stage:

 

·     A number of areas have been identified which suit the incorporation of passive ventilation using operable windows.

·     Strategies around compliance of the building envelope with energy efficiency regulations.

·     Specification of services components to suit exposed services (i.e. no ceilings) throughout the building.

 

The All Welcome Cultural and Civic Space development has been designed to incorporate a number of Ecologically Sustainable Design (ESD) initiatives which have been selected to meet or contribute towards the objectives of Council’s Sustainability Policy.

 

The building has been designed to:

 

·    Incorporate energy efficiency strategies that would be capable of achieving a 6 Star NABERS Energy rating.

NABERS definition: “The NABERS Energy for offices rating is a national rating system that measures building performance on a scale of zero to six stars.  A zero-star rating means the building is performing well below average and has lots of scope for improvement.  A six-star rating indicates a market leading performance, with half the greenhouse gas emissions or water use of a five-star building”.

·    140kW of façade integrated solar panels reducing the building’s electricity consumption by approximately 18%.

·    100kL rainwater storage reducing the onsite water consumption by 45%.

 

A summary of the design initiatives has been listed below and categorised according to Council’s Sustainability Policy:

 

1.    Zero Carbon - Ensure buildings and activities are energy efficient and deliver all energy with renewable technologies.

 

The proposed development is not able to source all its energy from renewable technologies.  However, it will include energy efficient building services and an on-site solar panel array to reduce its carbon footprint. A selection of these strategies includes:

 

·     140kW of solar panels on the roof generating approximately 190,000 kWh and reducing energy consumption by approximately 18%.

·     High performance façade incorporating the increased stringent measures of the 2019 Building Code of Australia (BCA) Section J.

·     Low energy air conditioning system incorporating the following features:

Air handling systems matched to thermal and operational zones.

Low velocity high efficiency handling plant.

Variable speed drive chillers, fans, and pumps to match the capacity with the load.

100% outdoor air economiser cycle using free cooling when ambient conditions are favourable.

Mixed mode natural ventilation to dedicated rooms adjacent the façade.

·     The buildings heating hot water requirements shall be met by way of a series of high-efficient air to water heat pumps boosted with the heat collected by solar panels.

·     Provision of power factor correction to reduce building maximum demand and energy consumption from the grid.

·     Inclusion of photoelectric sensors to automatically control external lighting around the building.

·     Provision of energy efficient LED lighting throughout.

·     Use of motion sensors for back of house areas and carpark to automatically switch luminaires off after a period of inactivity.

·     Provision of digital power meters for lighting, power, photovoltaics and mechanical equipment to meet NABERS requirements.  All digital power meters will interface with building management system to cater for energy consumption monitoring within the building.

·     Photoelectric cells to perimeter zones for daylight harvesting.

 

Based on this array of energy efficiency strategies and the proposed solar panel installation, which are currently allowed for within the Cost Plan, it is anticipated the building should be capable of performing with an equivalent NABERS energy rating of 6.0 Stars.  Currently the cost of certification ($15-25k) is not included in the current budget. It is assumed that monthly and annual monitoring would be undertaken by ongoing Council operations.

 

2.    Reduce Waste - Reduce waste by avoidance, reuse and recycling, maximising diversion of waste from landfill.

 

The project aims to maximise all the waste diverted from landfill to be recycled throughout the construction and operational phases of the development’s life.

 

3.    Sustainable Transport - Reduce the need to travel and encouraging low and zero carbon modes of transport to reduce emissions.

 

The proposed development seeks to minimise greenhouse gas emissions produced by transport to and from the site by providing staff bicycle parking and end-of-trip facilities to encourage cyclists.

 

A selection of these strategies includes:

 

·   60 bicycle rails for visitors,

·   40 bicycle spaces for staff / employees,

·   End-of-trips facilities, and

·   Pick-up / drop-off area for light vehicles and buses/coaches along the Gordon Street frontage.

 

4.    Local and Sustainable Materials – Maximising the use of sustainable and healthy products, such as those with low embodied energy, locally sourced, and made from renewable or recycled resources.

 

Materials will be sought from regional suppliers to minimise the carbon footprint from transportation.  Where possible timber with Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) or Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) certification will be sourced. Use of PVC and steel will be minimised and have proof of being responsibly sourced or having a sustainable supply chain.

 

5.    Local and Sustainable Food - Support sustainable and humane farming, promoting access to healthy, low impact, local, seasonal and organic diets and reducing food waste.

 

The design of the building does not directly ensure local procurement and growth of sustainable food sources.  However, as a community civic facility, the development provides a space to educate and promote local groups or events involved with sustainable food production.

 

6.    Sustainable Water - Use water efficiently in all buildings and operations. Designing to avoid local issues such as flooding, drought and water course pollution.

 

Demand from the local potable water utility is reduced through the provision of the following strategies:

 

·   High Australian Water Efficiency Labelling and Standards (WELS) equivalent fixtures and fitting selections.

·   Water metering and monitoring for each floor level, rainwater tank, mechanical plant and hot water plant.

·   All water sub-meters are connected to the building management system.

·   100 kL tank to collect and store rainwater to offset 45% of the annual needs for toilet flushing, irrigation and mechanical equipment needs.

 

7.    Land Use and Biodiversity - Protect and restore biodiversity and natural habitats through appropriate land use management and planning.

 

The project will be constructed on a previously developed site which has a large fig tree directly adjacent to the site.  The fig tree will remain and will be a focal point from which the building form of the development will follow.  As a result, the project has minimal impact to the surrounding biodiversity and ecological integrity.

 

The project has an indirect impact to conserve biodiversity and ecological integrity to the surrounding area.  By minimising demand on energy and water resources, the need for land-clearing and the pollution generated from new utility infrastructure to support the surrounding area will be minimised.

 

8.    Culture and Community - Respect and revive local identity, wisdom and culture; encouraging the involvement of people in shaping their community and creating a new culture of sustainability.

 

The development will be a civic space which provides a gathering point for the community through its library, museum, gallery, café, and meeting spaces.  As a local government building that aims to meet the objectives of Council’s Sustainability Policy, it encourages other developments to incorporate sustainable design outcomes through example.

 

9.    Equity and Local Economy - Create bioregional economies that support equity and diverse local employment and international fair trade.

 

The construction of the building will provide employment opportunities to local trades, consultants and contractors who support local businesses.  When in operation, building occupants will continue to support local businesses estimated to add $2m annually to the Gross Regional Product, reinvigorate the CBD and generate direct and indirect employment.

 

10.  Health and Happiness - Encourage active, sociable and meaningful lives to promote good health and wellbeing.

 

The proposed building design and services deliver comfort to occupants while minimising energy and potable water consumption.  The supply of higher than the minimum requirement of outdoor air to the occupied spaces and the use of low Volatile Organic Compounds and formaldehyde emitting materials ensures that sick building syndrome is minimised for the benefit of occupancy health.

 

Fire Engineering.  LCI Consultants have completed a preliminary fire safety strategy document, which outlines the objectives and the process involved in working through the detail of engineered fire safety solutions which are required to have parts of the design certified.  Key takeaways from this include that the atrium shall be sprinklered and be smoke-separated from the internal areas that surround it.  The opening in the level 3 slab provides for smoke exhaust from this area in case of fire.

 

Landscape.  Landscape is integral to the experience of All Welcome, and Urbis have worked collaboratively with BVN on the design of external areas outside the site boundary, ground floor and the open area at level 3.  Key components of the landscape design include:

 

·     Paving at ground floor incorporating a motif derived from the fig tree.

·     Selection of Ficus (fig tree) species in the atrium consistent with this character.

·     Greenery to roof area fulfilling the vision for an elevated public space.

·     Strategically located gathering areas provided with built-in outdoor furniture and decking.

 

Arborist.  Advice on working adjacent to and protecting the existing Hill’s Weeping Fig in Riding Lane has been captured by Arborist Network, with the impact on both the tree and the building being negligible due to the contained area of impact on the tree’s root zone.  They note that managed well, the proposed works have the potential to result in an improvement in the tree’s health and longevity.

 

Access & Building Code of Australia (BCA).  Philip Chun have completed a report including a review of documents, comments and recommendations with respect to the Building Code of Australia and Disability Discrimination Act legislature.  There are a range of items picked up in the compliance reports which will be addressed at the next stage.

 

Façade.  Surface Design consultancy provided design advice on the façade and this has been incorporated into the design team’s deliverables.  The facade of the building is primarily glass with vertical sunshades.  Significant discrete inputs into the design are as follows:

 

·     The preferred construction type for the main façade is a prefabricated, unitised curtain wall with the terracotta portions attached before installation.

·     Facade Reflectivity Report anticipates no excessive effects from reflections provided the specified façade finish meets provided reflectivity criteria.

·     Confirmed that, for façade maintenance including window cleaning, rope access is suitable.

 

Traffic & Parking.  Ason Group have undertaken a traffic and parking study for the project. 

 

The objectives of Ason’s study were to:

 

·     To provide appropriate input to the State Significant Development Application;

·     To demonstrate that there is an appropriate and sustainable provision of car and bicycle parking;

·     To establish that the forecast trip generation can be appropriately accommodated by the local and arterial road network; and

·     To demonstrate that the proposed access driveways, internal roads, car parks and service facilities comply with the relevant Australian Standards.

 

The above objectives have been achieved.  In summary:

 

·     Car parking requirements (i.e. supply and demand) have been modelled out to 10 years after opening of the facility and demand is satisfied by the proposed supply of basement car parking and capacity in the public carpark network surrounding the site;

·     The proposed 60 bicycle rails for visitors and 40 bicycle spaces for staff/employees satisfy project demand.  End-of-trips facilities (showers, drying room) support cyclists and other staff users;

·     The analysis assesses the net impact of the proposed development noting that the Proposal relocates a number of land uses within the immediate vicinity to the Site, and as such, there would be no material change to the surrounding road network; and

·     The site access, car park and loading areas have been designed to comply with the relevant Australian Standards (AS2890 series).

 

Waste.  Waste equipment manufacturer Elephants Foot have completed a study estimating waste volumes to be generated, and provided advice on bin room size and configuration based on a likely collection schedule.  The Bin Room at ground level is suitable to cater for the number of bins required - noting that Council’s collection schedule is less frequent than preferred by the Waste Management Plan - and that this would result in the bin room being compromised functionally or needing to be made larger.  Review and engagement is required at the next stage to confirm the collection schedule, bin room size and layout.

 

Flood Engineering.  The Flooding Assessment Report, completed by GHD, details the likelihood of flooding in the area and the impact of flooding on the All Welcome site as well as the impact that the development has on flooding in the surrounding area.  The modelling shows that the site is not inundated during a 1 in 500 year flood event.  The direct impacts on the building design which have come out of this study are the levels for the ground floor and carpark entry, which have been incorporated in accordance with GHD’s advice.

 

Structural & Civil Engineering.  Engineers TTW are responsible for the structural and civil design.  Key aspects of the structural scheme are as follows:

 

·     Basement retention system of soldier piles with shotcrete infill.

·     Typical superstructure featuring concrete structure with a maximum beam depth of 500mm.

·     Steel-framed columns and roof over level 3 executive offices, council chamber and shared public meeting space.

 

At the next stage, the use of metal deck permanent formwork system suitable for exposed soffit design (no ceilings) needs to be considered.

 

Wind.  Windtech completed a Pedestrian Environment study looking at occupant comfort at Ground Level and at Level 3 in the open area.  The study recommends retaining the existing Fig Tree in Riding Lane and including new planting to Gordon St to ameliorate potential unfavourable wind conditions in these areas, which includes the external café seating and external amphitheatre seating at level 3.  The landscape design by Urbis & BVN is in accordance with this advice.

 

Acoustic.  Pulse Acoustic provided an Environmental Impact Statement Report, particularly into the effects on local residential and recreation sites.  To do this, they installed noise loggers within the site and the closest residential facilities.  The conclusion was that subject to implementation of their recommendations, the project will be in compliance with the relevant statutory criterions.

 

Geotechnical assessment.  Regional Geotechnical Services’ (RGS) advice provided design criteria to the structural engineers to inform the basement retention system and pile specification.  RGS also developed a preliminary Acid Sulphate Soil Management Plan to enable cost estimating by Council and Slattery regarding soil dug out of the site for the basement car park and building footings.

 

Other Specialist Consultancies

 

Project Management.  Turner & Townsend Thinc (T&TT) have provided external project management services during the schematic design phase to ensure Council’s objectives and brief for the project are met.  This included project strategy involving procurement of a full design consultant team primarily based in Sydney, with fortnightly trips to work face to face with Council on various consultant and design elements of this complex brief.

 

T&TT have been responsible for the sequencing of delegated consultant work, monitoring progress of the master program, and management of project risk to deliver on the consultant team’s remit of schematic design and authority approval documentation.  This work has been developed in liaison with Council for submission of co-ordinated consultant documents within Councils approved Project Budget of $76.52m by the end of June 2019.

 

Method of procurement review.  As the schematic design phase has progressed and more information surrounding the project has developed, T&TT have lead the review of the proposed procurement strategy for the project’s builder and have workshopped with Council on the risks associated.  T&TT’s recommendation to Council is a Design & Construction with 2 Stage Early Contractor Engagement Procurement Model (2-stage D&C).

 

The 2-stage D&C procurement model is arranged in a manner which separates the Preferred Tenderer’s ‘Management Fee’ Offer (Preliminaries, Overheads & Margin) from the Trade Costs, and is structured around the tenderers providing a ‘Target Cost Plan’ for the overall project.

 

Upon establishment of key trade package costs, this model will require the Preferred Contractor to convert their price to a Fixed D&C price offering within a fixed timeframe (around April 2020 subject to SSD approval).  Should this not be achieved, all design development and documentation reverts to Council with the option to go back to market for a traditional lump sum D&C tender process.

 

At the point of conversion (Fixed D&C price offering) the design team are novated to the control of the Contractor to finalise design documentation, resolve outstanding design details and document for Construction (as opposed to document for brief).

 

The advantages of 2-stage D&C for All Welcome include:

 

·     2-stage D&C procurement permits Early Contractor Involvement (ECI) while maintaining competitive tension within the procurement process;

·     ECI ensures good advice in terms of constructability and market knowledge which can be used to inform the design;

·     Council can maintain input/control of the design throughout stage 1 (Pre-Contract Developed Design Phase) without the risk of incurring large cost penalties normally associated with Fixed Lump Sum contracts;

·     The Preferred Contractor’s (i.e. builder’s) preliminaries, overheads and margin are fixed which provides motivation for the contractor carrying the risk of time; and

·     Award of Contract at Stage 2 leads to risk transfer to the builder and greater cost and time assurance for Council.

 

Planning.  GeoLINK have delivered the development application in draft, ready for submission to the Department of Planning and Environment. 

 

Quantity Surveying.  Slattery have estimated the full project cost (i.e. Total End Cost) based on the Schematic Design.  The Total End Cost of Cost Plan No.5 Rev 1 is $76,519,404 (exc. GST) which is within established project budget expectations.  The Cost Plan includes a design contingency of 5.0% for resolution of design items prior to the builder’s tender.  Also included is a contract contingency of 10.0% for the construction phase of the project.  These contingencies are intended for design documentation issues and are not for changes in scope.  The Cost Plan document is commercially sensitive regarding further tendering for consultants and the builder, so is attached but Confidential (Attachment 14).

 

The Slattery Cost Plan has been peer reviewed by the quantity surveyors at Turner & Townsend and they “are of the opinion that the current Slattery's cost plan is within an acceptable range, however would note key specific items for enquiry at the next phase of the project, as outlined within the body of this report (sic T&T peer review report).

 

Workplace Strategy.  Calder Consultants (Calder) were engaged in December 2018 to develop a workplace strategy for Council.  Since February stakeholder engagement has continued regarding the future workplace and the project architect, BVN Architecture, has undertaken Schematic Design incorporating Calder’s findings.  Insights from post-February work are included in this summary.

 

Current Council office accommodation presents a range of challenges including:

 

·     Lack of meeting spaces – closable rooms of various sizes for private/confidential meetings and appropriate areas for non-confidential meetings

·     Lack of quiet areas for uninterrupted, concentrated solo work without disruption from other staff and customers

·     Lack of team and project work areas that don’t interrupt other staff and customers and enable collateral to remain in place over the course of a project

 

The workplace strategy is to implement a hybrid, team-based neighbourhood model.  The future workplace is predicted to comprise a variety of desk-based (1 desk per person), hybrid (internally mobile, working anywhere in the office and site) and flexi (externally mobile, working from other sites) with very few dedicated offices.  The neighbourhood model loosely allocates zones within the workspace to staff groups.

 

Calder recommended a split of 20% 1 desk per person and 80% hybrid / flexi could be achieved as a first-pass noting that this is dependent on the ability for the groups to digitise work processes, embrace flexible working, adapt to new mobile technology, and a significant change management investment.  The workplace will be designed to be flexible from day 1 and over time.  Flexibility is to ensure that the day 1 workforce is catered for and that a variety of workplace configurations can be implemented over time.

Options:

1.   Adopt the recommendations of this report.

 

2.   Reject the recommendations of the report such that the project is not progressed and the current situation regarding Council’s cultural and civic assets is unchanged.

 

3.   Change the scope of the project, noting that the time (9 months) and expenditure ($2m) invested on Schematic Design and Development Application preparation last financial year would be compromised.

OR

Change the scope of the project, noting that additional expenditure on Schematic Design and preparing a Development Application would be required and the project would be delayed.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

The building design is developing to respond to the unique environmental conditions of the Coffs Harbour region by implementing low embodied energy construction systems and materials.  It aims to minimise energy use and harness the climate to improve the quality of spaces through passive and active solar and system design.  Sustainability of the people is equally important - the physical space shall support the health and well-being of the occupants, encourage them to thrive, and be a catalyst for them reaching purpose and potential.  The building will target a wide range of sustainability initiatives to align with Council’s Sustainability Policy.  The Building Services & Sustainability section above provides a detailed analysis.

•     Social

A range of community and cultural benefits will flow from the development including a vibrant cultural hub, improved literacy, educational and lifelong learning, improved social and wellbeing outcomes, increased exhibition spaces and programs, increased visitor numbers and a variety of cultural facilities and spaces that don’t exist today.

 

The CCS Project Concept Business Case projected that the annual visitation to these facilities by Year 5 post-construction to be around 412,000.

•     Civic Leadership

Civic leadership is shown through the ongoing implementation of MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.  Council sees an opportunity to match the needs of our growing population, civic leadership and to add value to the city as an urban renewal opportunity and a cultural, community, business and visitor destination.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

An independent economic assessment identified a host of benefits to the CBD including a variety of financial benefits over a 30 year period totalling $57m, 31 on-going jobs and an extra $2m per annum Gross Regional Product.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Funding for and affordability of the project

 

Financial modelling shows that the Council is in a strong financial position to undertake the project and that the project only has a short term impact on the financial performance ratio of the Council.  Under Council’s current Long Term Financial Plan, Council was due to have a positive operating performance ratio in the 2020/21 financial year however the Council forward estimates have already provided for a positive operating performance ratio in the 2019/20 financial year and the ratio remains positive for the whole of the forward estimates with the inclusion of the project.

 

 

Funding for construction of the project is proposed to be sourced from three different sources.  The first is through the utilisation of the T2S Reserve for a total of $10.5million.

 

The second is through the sale of four assets being Rigby House, the Castle Street Administration Building, the Rose Avenue Commercial Offices and the Museum.  Independent valuations place the combined value of these buildings at approximately $20million.  The signed valuation page from the independent valuation reports by Savills Valuations Pty Ltd for each of the above assets are Attachment 15 (Confidential).

 

The Local Government Act 1993 is clear on the sale of land as follows:

 

Section 377

 

(1)    A council may, by resolution, delegate to the general manager or any other person or body (not including another employee of the council) any of the functions of the council under this or any other Act, other than the following:

(h)   the compulsory acquisition, purchase, sale, exchange or surrender of any land or other property (but not including the sale of items of plant or equipment).

 

The Council’s Disposal of Assets Policy states, “In the case of items with a disposal value of $150,000 or above the requirements of section 55 of the Local Government Act 1993 apply.” The expressions of interest process, which is recommended to the Council, will be carried out in accordance with Section 55 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

It is also recommended that the sale price be no less than the independent valuation less 10%. This allows the General Manager to have a level of discretion in negotiating the sale of the properties and is line with previous land sales conducted by Council, such as 36 Gordon Street, Coffs Harbour.

 

The third funding source is loan borrowings.  To complete the $76.52million construction project the Council would need to borrow $46.02million.  At this time, the modelling has not included the inclusion of any grant funding.  Should the project receive any grant funding, then this grant funding would reduce the amount of the proposed borrowing.  The Council is well within the Debt Service Ratio target as set by the Office of Local Government and the additional borrowing outlined within the report would still leave the Council within the target.

 

During the construction period of the building, the financial model does show an increase in cash flow requirements due to increased operational costs around the rent required to be paid for current buildings after their sale and debt servicing.  For this reason, in the 2020/21 and 2021/22 financial years the money usually allocated to the T2S reserve will be required to be utilised on other capital works within the community.  The allocation into the T2S reserve would recommence in the 2022/23 financial year.

 

$5.158million is allocated in the 2019/20 budget to progress the project.

Risk Analysis:

A risk register is maintained between Council’s Project Office and the external Project Manager, Turner & Townsend Thinc.  The key risks below are extracted from that register.

 

Key Risks

Ref

Risk

Mitigation

Owner

1

State Significant Development Approval is delayed incurring a delay in Stage 2 D&C Contract Award in Q2 2020.

Stage 1 award of ‘Preferred Contractor’ allows early contractor involvement in 2019. Demolition works are separated from the SSD application to enable the works to be undertaken in Q1 2020.

Council

2

The Department of Planning and Environment may request Council provide information on the concurrent Riding Lane Upgrade project during the SSD approval period. A delay in responding may delay approval.

Council to align programmes to mitigate risk of delay to All Welcome SSD.

Council

3

Assets (Rigby House, Castle St admin, Rose Ave commercial & Museum) may not sell for the estimated value in a timely manner.

A sensitivity analysis was conducted regarding Council’s operating performance ratio (OPR) & debt serviceability impact if the sales realised only 50% of valuations.  Modelling shows that OPR return to positive would be pushed back a year and the debt would increase $10m but remain be serviceable without special rate increase.

Council

4

Risk that the Office of Local Government (OLG) advises against the project upon receipt of the Capital Expenditure Review, resulting in the project being abandoned.

Capital Expenditure Report to be written to OLG standards

Council

5

Latent conditions in the ground such as contamination, unmarked services, buried asbestos causing additional time and cost.

A contamination report has been provided to Council reporting a presence of heavy metals and acid sulphate soils. An acid sulphate soil management plan and de-watering recommendations outline contractor requirements and have been included in Slattery's Cost Plan. Further testing is required following removal of ground slab, note in-ground asbestos has not yet been ruled out as this requires the removal of ground slab.

Council

 

To further enable mitigation of the risks and to ensure good governance for the Project, a Project Board was established. This Board is chaired by the General Manager and has met formally on a regular basis over the last nine months to consider Project Status Reports and review the status of the risk register. The Project Board also undertook the role of value managing the project aspects to ensure the outcomes delivered on the Project Brief and remained within the allocated budget.

Consultation:

Extensive community and staff engagement was conducted from September 2018 to June 2019. Additionally, targeted stakeholder consultation was undertaken to further inform the design of the building.  Throughout the process the Library and Gallery Planning Advisory Group (LGPAG) have remained closely engaged as the formal community advisory group.

 

There were many avenues for the community to be informed of the design (print and radio media, newsletters, information stands, meetings and forums, rate notice information and much more) and provide comment.  Ten targeted groups were identified for more detailed consultation and engagement including Migrants, people experiencing homelessness, Youth and Indigenous.  Many of these groups were engaged on multiple occasions throughout the Schematic Design phase.

 

At the public release of the Schematic Design, feedback was open from 10 – 31 May 2019.  Extensive promotion was conducted that enabled written feedback to be provided through a range of platforms.  78 written feedback submissions were received.  Overall written feedback was 51% positive and supportive of the project, 23% neutral, suggestions or unrelated and 26% opposed to the project in part or its entirety.  After extensive communication and engagement, a limited amount of written feedback was received.  it should be noted that a percentage of the negative feedback was in respect to there being no performance space in the Cultural and Civic space project. As council is aware, the performance space was intentionally separated from this project at the outset and is the subject of a separate body of work.  For further details, refer Attachments 12 & 13.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Enabling of strategic outcomes:

 

·     MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan

·     The City Centre Master Plan 2031 and its desired outcomes are enabled in part by this project through activation of the Gordon St site and freeing up of the 2 Castle St site for future activation.

·     The Creative Coffs – Cultural Strategic Plan 2017 – 2022

·     The Coffs Harbour City Library Strategic Plan 2012 – 2016

·     Economic Development Strategy 2017-2022

·     Coffs Coast Tourism Strategic Plan 2020

·     Coffs Harbour Events Strategy 2020

·     Disposal of Assets Policy

Implementation Date / Priority:

 

Key Project Milestones

Start date

End date

1

Development application processing and approval

Jul 2019

Apr 2020

2

Detailed Design

Jul 2019

Apr 2020

3

Award Design & Construction Stage 1 Contract

Jul 2019

Sep 2019

4

Demolition

Jan 2020

Mar 2020

5

Award Stage 2 Contract

Apr 2020

Apr 2020

6

Construction

May 2020

Jul 2022

7

Construction contingency

Jul 2022

Oct 2022

 

Above is extracted from the external Project Manager’s, Turner & Townsend Thinc (T&TT), programme (Attachment 11).

Conclusion:

In the 9 months since the Resolution 2018/197 was made, Schematic Design and drafting of development application (DA) documentation have been completed.  This report provides Council with the opportunity to approve progression of the project to detailed design and construction.

 


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GM19/19      Council Policy - Submissions Policy

Author:                        Governance Coordinator

Authoriser:                  Group Leader Governance

MyCoffs:                      D.1 Our leaders give us confidence in the future

Attachments:              ATT1  GM19/19  Submissions Policy  

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of policy is to document Council’s intent, commitment and/or a position on a particular topic as well as ensure transparency and accountability in local government.  This report presents the amended Submissions Policy for adoption.

 

Recommendation:

That Council adopt the amended Submissions Policy.

 

Report

Description of Item:

The purpose of policy is to document Council’s intent, commitment and/or a position on a particular topic as well as ensure transparency and accountability in local government.

Policy Name

Policy detail

Submissions Policy

Coffs Harbour City Council welcomes submissions from members of the community and industry stakeholders as this feedback is critical in Council’s achievement of informed and transparent decision making. The purpose of this policy is to assist those making a submission and ensure that Council’s consideration of submissions is fair and consistent.

This policy has been amended to provide details on how Council receives and manages petitions.

Issues:

There are no issues associated with this report.

Options:

It is considered that the following options are available to Council:

1.    Adopt the recommendation provided to Council.

2.    Amend the recommendation or policy provided to Council and then adopt.

3.    Reject the amended policy provided to Council meaning that the current policy without amendment will remain in place.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental issues associated with this report.

•     Social

Policies are an important communication tool used by Council for providing our community and general public detail on strategic aims, commitments and obligations.

•     Civic Leadership

Policies are important for ensuring transparency and accountability in local government.  Their implementation enables Council to identify and respond to the community.  This is consistent with the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan strategy D.1 Our leaders give us confidence in the future.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

There are no broad economic impacts associated with the implementation of the recommendations.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The ongoing development and review of Council policies and plans are accommodated within Council’s budget structure.  This expenditure is monitored through Council’s monthly and quarterly budget reviews.

Risk Analysis:

There were no significant risks identified in the adoption of this policy.

Consultation:

Internal stakeholders were consulted with the drafting of this policy.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Detailed within the policy as required.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Immediate.

Conclusion:

That council adopt the amended Submissions Policy.

 



 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


NOM19/05   Updating Coffs Harbour City Council Vehicles

Attachments:          Nil

 

Motion:

Councillor Arkan has given notice of his/her intention to move the following:

"That Coffs Harbour City Council consider updating the executive cars to substainable technology vehicles, e.g Electric Vehicles, in line with Rationale Providing leadership in our strategic plans is vital."

 

Rationale:

“Technology is available for vehicles to be run in sustainable way. They are cost effective and environmentally essential. With charging stations and associated infustructure becoming readily available council could take a positive step and lead the way with initial transformation of the executive fleet.

 

I note there way be possible future subsidies available to councils in the near future for taking this important step.

 

The availability of charge stations and related support , will need to also be provided.”

Staff Comment:

Considering the addition of electric vehicles into the Council fleet has merit, particluarly if this occurs for vehicles where the most benefit is derived. It is important for all environmental and financial factors to be taken into consideration and it therefore recommended that a report be prepared for Council to provide all the relevant information before a decision is made.

  


QON19/02    Odour Levels - Waste Facility

Author:                        Group Leader Strategic Asset Management

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

Attachments:              Nil

 

The following question on notice was received from Councillor Amos.

Question

“Could council please provide an update on the position on eliminating extreme odour levels that intermittently come from the Englands Road Biomass treatment facility?”

Response

The New South Wales Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) are the controlling body administering the Protection of the Envirommental Operations Act 1997 (POEO Act).

Biomass Solutions (Coffs Harbour) Pty Ltd undertake a scheduled activity for waste management which requires the company to operate in compliance with an Environmental Protection Licence (EPL) in accordance with the POEO Act.

In March 2017, in response to complaints received which related to offensive odours, the EPA issued to Biomass a Notice of Preventative Action under the EPL. This notice required Biomass to undertake actions to mitigate the emission of offensive odours.

Council is aware that the EPA and Biomass are continuing to work through the actions to eliminate odour emissions.