Coffs Harbour City Council

28 November 2018

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

The above meeting will be held in the Council Administration Building

Cnr Coff and Castle Streets, Coffs Harbour on:

 

Thursday, 6 December 2018

 

The meeting commences at 5.00pm and your attendance is requested.

 

 

AGENDA

 

1.         Opening of Ordinary Meeting

2.         Acknowledgment of Country

3.         Disclosure of Interest

4.         Apologies

5.         Public Addresses / Public Forum

6.         Mayoral Minute

7.         Mayoral Actions under Delegated Authority

8.         Confirmation of Minutes

9.         Rescission Motion

10.      Notices of Motion - General

11.      General Manager’s Reports

12.      Notices of Motion – Business Services

13.      Directorate Reports – Business Services

14.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Communities

15.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Communities

16.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Infrastructure

17.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Infrastructure

18.      Notices of Motion - Trust

19.      Trust Reports

20.      Requests for Leave of Absence

21.      Questions On Notice

22.      Matters of an Urgent Nature

23.      Consideration of Confidential Items (if any)

24.      Close of Ordinary Meeting.

 

 

Steve  McGrath

General Manager

 

 


Order of Business

 

  

General Manager's Reports

GM18/34         Council Committees - Appointment of Members..................................... 3

GM18/35         New Council Policies and Delegation......................................................... 6

GM18/36         2018 Code of Conduct Complaint Statistic Report ........................... 17

GM18/37         Committee/Panel - Appointment of Councillor ................................... 22

GM18/38         City Centre Master Plan Committee ......................................................... 24

Directorate Reports - Business Services

BS18/72          Coffs Coast State Park Trust Special Purpose Financial Report and Audit 2017-18........................................................................................................... 27

BS18/73          Coffs Harbour Regional Boat Ramp Precinct Enhancement Committee - Final Report - Enhancements for the Coffs Harbour Regional Boat Ramp Precinct....................................................................... 52

BS18/74          Coffs Harbour Regional Airport Governance and Management Options - Stage 2 Evaluation Report........................................................ 80

Directorate Reports - Sustainable Communities

SC18/44          Draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy Strategic Approach.......................................................................................... 86

SC18/45          Draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy Chapter 5 - Rural Lands................................................................................................... 183

SC18/46          Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Precinct - NSW Government Consultation Process Update................................................................... 258

SC18/47          Coffs Future Transport Strategy - Project Scope....................... 391

SC18/48          Sustainability Advisory Committee.......................................................... 397

Directorate Reports - Sustainable Infrastructure

SI18/25           Traffic Committee Meeting Nos. 6/2018 & 7/2018.................................... 403

SI18/26           Amendment to Alcohol Free Areas in Woolgoolga CBD for Eat Street Events.................................................................................................... 415

SI18/27           Draft Vehicles on Beaches Policy........................................................... 418

SI18/28           Coffs Coast Waste Services - Bulky Goods Service....................... 442   


GM18/34      Council Committees - Appointment of Members

Author:                        Governance Coordinator

Authoriser:                  Group Leader Governance

MyCoffs:                      A.1 A vibrant and inclusive place

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

Nominations for Council Committee members require approval by Council.  This report is seeking Council endorsement of committee nominations.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council Appoints:

1.   Kerry Pritchard to the Lowanna Hall Management Committee

2.   Bec Neal to the Toormina Community Centre Management Committee

3.   Kate Sibio to the Eastern Dorrigo Showground and Community Hall Facility Management Committee

4.   Tony Ross to the Floodplain Risk Management Committee

5.   Gabrielle Pietrini to the Environmental Levy Grants Program Panel

 

Report

Description of Item:

As part of the normal functioning of Council Committees, community members are nominated to fill vacant positions.  For nominees to be appointed, they need to be ratified by Council.  The following nominations have been submitted to appoint:

 

1.    Kerry Pritchard to the Lowanna Hall Management Committee (LHMC)

2.    Bec Neal to the Toormina Community Centre Management Committee (TCCMC)

3.    Kate Sibio to the Eastern Dorrigo Showground and Community Hall Facility Management Committee (EDSMC)

4.    Tony Ross to the Floodplain Risk Management Committee

5.    Gabrielle Pietrini to the Environmental Levy Grants Program Panel

 

The LHMC, TCCMC and EDSMC are all low on numbers with both the LHMC and TCCMC not meeting the minimum of five community members required by the Terms of Reference.  Kerry Pritchard was invited by the LHMC due to their current experience within another Council committee.  Positions for the TCCMC have been advertised on Council’s website on an ongoing basis and the committee invited Bec Neal as they are already involved with managing the venue.  The EDSMC invited Kate Sibio as they were already volunteering their services to events held by the committee.

 

The Floodplain Risk Management Committee terms of reference allows for three community committee members, currently, the committee only has one.  Council advertised for committee members on 6 September 2017, however, no applications were received. On 31 January 2018, Floodplain Risk Management Committee resolved to contact the Coffs Harbour, Sawtell and Northern Beaches Chambers of Commerce to invite community representatives.  As a result, one application was received by Tony Ross on 10 October 2018.

 

Since the adoption of the New Environmental Levy Policy and associated guidelines, Council officers have been working to identify an appropriate interagency person to complete the Environmental Levy Grants Program panel membership.  Gabrielle Pietrini is the Director North East, Conservation and Regional Delivery Division for the Office of Environment and Heritage and has agreed to join the panel from 2019 as the interagency person.

Issues:

There are no issues relevant to this matter.

Options:

1.    Adopt the recommendation provided to Council.

2.    Amend the recommendation provided to Council by rejecting one or more nominated committee members, and then adopt.

3.    Reject the recommendation provided to Council.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental issues associated with this report.

•     Social

The care, control and management of these local community facilities by local residents and local community groups enable a sense of community ownership, community involvement and development and overall community well-being.

 

Appointing community members to Council committees also recognises and uses the valuable contribution the community makes for the effective provision of Council’s functions.

•     Civic Leadership

This approach is consistent with the Council’s MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan:

 

A.1 A vibrant and inclusive place

B.2 A community achieving its potential.

Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Management committees are generally formed to manage, on behalf of Council, a facility or service in the interest of the user and community at large.  These committees are involved in the day to day management and are also delegated certain functions of the General Manager to allow them to ensure the facility or service meets Council’s expectations.  These committees report annually to Council on their performance.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

These committees strive to be self-funding but most require a contribution from Council and this is resolved within Council’s Operational Plan and budget setting process.  Most committees involve Council in technical, secretarial or administration costs.  The time and assistance given to Council by volunteers represents significant cost savings to the organisation.

Risk Analysis:

There are no specific risks associated with the appointment of committee members.  All volunteers are required to sign and comply with Council’s Code of Conduct.

Consultation:

Consultation has occurred and continues to occur with various stakeholders involved in each of these committees.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The following statutory requirements of the Local Government Act 1993 are applicable:

 

Section 355 How does a council exercise its functions?

 

A function of a council may, subject to this Chapter, be exercised:

 

a)    by the council by means of the councillors or employees, by its agents or contractors, by financial provision, by the provision of goods, equipment, services, amenities or facilities or by any other means, or

b)    by a committee of the council, or

c)    partly or jointly by the council and another person or persons, or

d)    jointly by the council and another council or councils (including by means of a Voluntary Regional Organisation of Councils of which the councils concerned are members), or

e)    by a delegate of the council (which may, for example, be a Voluntary Regional Organisation of Councils of which the council is a member).

 

Section 377 General power of the council to delegate

Implementation Date / Priority:

Immediate.

Conclusion:

That Council endorses the recommendations within this report.

 

 


GM18/35      New Council Policies and Delegation

Author:                        Governance Coordinator

Authoriser:                  Group Leader Governance

MyCoffs:                      D.1 Our leaders give us confidence in the future

Attachments:              ATT1  GM18/35  Information Security and Management Policy

ATT2  GM18/35  Legislative Compliance Policy

ATT3  GM18/35  Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard Policy  

Executive Summary

The purpose of policy is to document Council’s intent, commitment and/or a position on a particular topic as well as ensure transparency and accountability in local government.  This report presents three policies for Council adoption.

 

This report also seeks Council resolution to nominate Council’s qualified Native Title Managers as required by Section 8.8 of the Crown Land Management Act 2016 and notify the Minister for Lands and Forestry.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.    Adopts the following new policies:

1.1  Information Security and Management Policy

1.2  Legislative Compliance Policy

1.3  Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard Policy

2.    Nominate Mark Griffioen (Group Leader Financial Services and Logistics), Wendy Sharpe (Section Leader Logistics) and Jason Bailey (Manager Holiday Parks and Reserves) as its Native Title Managers.

3.    Give notice to the Minister for Lands and Forestry of the contact details of Mark Griffioen (Group Leader Financial Services and Logistics), Wendy Sharpe (Section Leader Logistics) and Jason Bailey (Manager Holiday Parks and Reserves) as its Native Title Managers, in accordance with Section 8.8 of the Crown Land Management Act 2016.

 

Report

Description of Item:

The purpose of policy is to document Council’s intent, commitment and/or a position on a particular topic as well as ensure transparency and accountability in local government.  The following table provides detail of the policies ready for adoption.

 


 

Policy Name

Policy Detail

Information Security and Management Policy

Coffs Harbour City Council (Council) is committed to managing information security in accordance with Council policies, legislation and relevant laws and regulations.

 

This policy outlines how Council will manage and mitigate security risks to safeguard the confidentiality, integrity and availability of Council’s information and communication technology assets and environment.

Legislative Compliance Policy

Coffs Harbour City Council, in accordance with community expectations, principles of good corporate governance and public administration has an obligation to comply with its legislative requirements and obligations.

 

The purpose of this policy is for Council to be able to provide a reasonable level of assurance that its legislative and other compliance obligations are being met.

 

As a key element in its risk management framework, Council will ensure processes for identifying, evaluating, assigning and monitoring compliance with existing, new and amended legislation and other compliance obligations to ensure on-going compliance.

Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard Policy

The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is a set of guidelines developed by MasterCard, Visa, American Express, Discover and JCB International to assist merchants in preventing payment card fraud and to improve security around processing and storing payment card details. Any company processing, storing or transmitting the above branded payment card numbers must be PCI DSS compliant or they risk losing the ability to process these payments.

 

Coffs Harbour City Council (Council) is required to be compliant with the PCI DSS. Non-compliance can result in fines to merchants of at least $10,000 per month and $500,000 per card brand (e.g. Visa, MasterCard) if there is a data breach. Annual verification of compliance must be supplied to any banking institution that provides Council with the means to accept the abovementioned card payments.

 

The Crown Land Management Act 2016 commenced from 1 July 2018.  The practice of managing Crown Lands in the Local Government Area will be changing significantly to comply with the requirements under the Act.  One of the changes relates to a need for each Council to nominate its qualified Native Title Manager.  Section 8.8 of the Crown Land Management Act 2016 requires each Council to give notice to the Minister for Lands and Forestry of the name and contact details of any person the Council has engaged or employed as a Native Title Manager.  The notice must be given as soon as practicable after 30 June (but not later than 31 October) of each year.

 

Section 377(1) of the Local Government Act 1993 states that the giving of a notice to the Governor or Minister is a non-delegable function meaning a resolution of Council is required.

 

To be qualified as a Native Title Manager, the person must attend a training session jointly provided by the Crown Solicitors Office and the Department of Industry - Crown Lands.  Mark Griffioen (Group Leader Financial Services and Logistics), Wendy Sharpe (Section Leader Logistics) and Jason Bailey (Manager Holiday Parks and Reserves) have all attended this training and attained the Native Title Manager qualification.

Issues:

There are no issues associated with this adopting the policies within this report or nominating the qualified Native Title Managers.

Options:

It is considered that the following options are available to Council:

 

1.    Adopt the recommendation provided to Council.

2.    Amend the recommendation or one or more of the policies provided and then adopt.

3.    Reject the policies provided to Council.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental issues associated with this report.

•     Social

Policies are an important communication tool used by Council for providing our community and general public detail on strategic aims, commitments and obligations.

•     Civic Leadership

Policies are important for ensuring transparency and accountability in local government.  Their implementation enables Council to identify and respond to the community.  This is consistent with the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan strategy D.1 Our leaders give us confidence in the future.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

There are no broad economic impacts associated with the implementation of the recommendations.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The ongoing development and review of Council policies are accommodated within Council’s budget structure.  This expenditure is monitored through Council’s monthly and quarterly budget reviews.

Risk Analysis:

There is no perceived risk in the adoption of the policies listed in this report or in nominating Council’s qualified Native Title Managers.

Consultation:

Consultation has occurred with relevant internal stakeholders.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Related policy, precedent and / or statutory requirements are detailed within each policy as required.

 

The following is relevant to the appointment of Native Title Managers:

 

·     Section 8.8 of the Crown Land Management Act 2016 - Council is required to give notice to the Minister for Lands and Forestry of the name and contact details of any person Council has engaged or employed as a Native Title Manager

·     Section 377(1) of the Local Government Act 1993 states that the giving of a notice to the Governor or Minister is a non-delegable function meaning a resolution of Council is required.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Immediate.

Conclusion:

That council adopt the attached policies, nominate the recommended Council Native Title Managers and give notice to the minister for Lands and Forestry the required details of these nominees.

 

 



 


 



 



 


GM18/36      2018 Code of Conduct Complaint Statistic Report

Author:                        Governance Coordinator

Authoriser:                  Group Leader Governance

MyCoffs:                      D.1 Our leaders give us confidence in the future

Attachments:              ATT1  GM18/36  2018 Code of Conduct Complaints Report  

 

Executive Summary

This report tables Council’s Code of Conduct (CoC) complaint statistics report, which is required to be presented to Council in accordance with the Office of Local Government’s (OLG) Procedures for Administration of Model Code of Conduct.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council note the 2018 Code of Conduct Complaints report.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Under the OLG’s Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct, there is a requirement to annually report a range of CoC complaint statistics to the both OLG and Council.  This report is due within three months of the end of September of each year.  The Complaints Report submitted to the OLG is attached.

Issues:

Code of conduct complaints and their details are confidential and therefore this report only presents statistical information.  No other information regarding the complaint will be provided (e.g. nature of complaint, complainant or subject person etc.).

Options:

As the report is for noting only, an options analysis is not required.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Not applicable to this report.

•     Social

Not applicable to this report.

•     Civic Leadership

Not applicable to this report.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Not applicable to this report.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The costs associated with CoC complaints are funded through Council’s Governance Services budget.  Code of Conduct complaints are difficult to budget as the number, costs and nature of each complaint varies and therefore expenditure is reactionary and mostly unplanned.

Risk Analysis:

There are no risks associated with the noting of this report.

Consultation:

Not applicable to this report.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

This report is required in order to meet the requirements of Part 12 of the Procedures for the Administration of the Model Code of Conduct.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Nil.

Conclusion:

The report presents Council’s Annual CoC complaint statistics.

 

 



 


 


GM18/37      Committee/Panel - Appointment of Councillor

Author:                        Group Leader Governance

Authoriser:                  General Manager

MyCoffs:                      D.1 Our leaders give us confidence in the future

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

Following Cr Tegan Swan becoming Deputy Mayor in September, this report seeks to nominate councillor/s as the alternate member on the Northern Regional Planning Panel (NRPP) – previously known as the Joint Regional Planning Panel -  and the General Manager’s Performance review panel.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Nominate Cr _________ to be the alternate Councillor representative on the Northern Regional Planning Panel.

2.       Nominate Cr__________ as the Councillor representative on the General Manager’s Performance Review Panel.

 

Report

Description of Item:

In September this year, Councillor Swan was elected as Deputy Mayor.  Cr Swan is currently the council nominated Councillor on the JRPP and General Managers Performance Review Panel. The position of Deputy Mayor also has a nominated position on this committee and panel.

 

This report seeks nomination to fill the council nominated vacancies.

Issues:

There are no issues associated with this report.

Options:

Council could resolve to not nominate a Councillor, however this would not be in the best interests of Council.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental issues associated with this report.

•     Social

There are no social issues associated with this report.

•     Civic Leadership

Councillor participation in committees and on panels is consistent with the MyCoffs theme ‘our leaders give us confidence in the future’.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

There are no broader economic implications as a result of this report.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

There are no Delivery Program/Operational Plan implications as a result of this report.

Risk Analysis:

There is minimal risk in the appointment of Councillors to these committees.

Consultation:

Not applicable.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The General Managers Performance Review Panel is s355 committee of Council.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Immediate

Conclusion:

Council nominate Councillors to the NRPP and GM performance review panel as Cr Swan is now a member of both in the role of Deputy Mayor.

 


GM18/38      City Centre Master Plan Committee

Author:                        Group Leader Governance

Authoriser:                  General Manager

MyCoffs:                      A.1 A vibrant and inclusive place

Attachments:              ATT1  GM18/38  CONFIDENTIAL Summary of Outcomes

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(a) of the Local Government Act as it contains personnel matters concerning particular individuals (other than Councillors).  

 

Executive Summary

The term of all of the roles within the City Centre Master Plan Committee (CCMPC) has expired and Council has advertised an expression of interest to fill the vacancies.  This report seeks to endorse appointment of the proposed new members.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.   Appoints Peter Dowling, John Gowing, Cherie Parik, Rob Ellingham and Oliver Gee to the City Centre Master Plan Committee.

2.   Note that expressions of interest for two City Centre retailers to be re-called in early 2019.

3.   Notes a review of the City Centre Master Plan Committee terms of reference is conducted within two years, with a focus on activation

4.   Thank the outgoing committee for their input and diligence during their tenure

 

Report

Description of Item:

The City Centre Master Plan Committee (CCMPC) was established in June 2012 to assist in the development of Council’s City Centre Master Plan 2031.  The Masterplan was required as a condition of the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal’s (IPART) 2012 determination to allow the special variation (SV) for one year.  This SV enabled Council to charge a CBD Special Rate to fund a variety of city centre projects.  The City Centre Master Plan 2031 was adopted in February 2013 and Council subsequently applied to the IPART for a SV to its general rate.  In June 2013, IPART granted the ten-year SV requested by Council.

The SV works schedule in the initial years is largely focussed around infrastructure projects.  The final years are to be more focussed on activation.  With this in mind it is recommended the term of this committee be two years, with the Terms of Reference to be reviewed with this focus prior to that time.

Issues:

The current CCMPC Terms of Reference state the following as the composition of the committee:

-     The Mayor

-     One community member that is neither a retailer nor a city centre landowner

-     Four City Centre landowners (three landowners of property valued at greater than $1,000,000; and one property owner of land values less than $1,000,000)

-     Two City Centre retailers who are not City Centre property owners

All positions on the committee have expired and are therefore currently vacant.  The existing committee has continued to meet while the expression of interest process has been occurring.

Advertising for the positions commenced in June 2018 and due to limited interest and subsequent applications, again in late August/September.  On both of these occasions advertising occurred in the local newspaper as well as an extensive mailout, including SV ratepayers and shopfronts.

Both advertising periods failed to get any applications from city centre retailers.  It is therefore recommended that a separate expression of interest be called, for the two city centre retailers, in early 2019.

Options:

1.    Adopt the recommendation provided to Council.

2.    Amend the recommendation provided to Council by rejecting one or more nominated committee members.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental issues associated with this report.

•     Social

Appointing community members to Council committees also recognises and uses the valuable contribution the community makes for the effective provision of Council’s functions.

•     Civic Leadership

This approach consistent with the Council’s MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan:

 

- A.1 A vibrant and inclusive place

- B.2 A community achieving its potential.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The CCMPC’s primary objective is to assist Council achieve the vision of the City Centre Master Plan.  Accordingly, this in turn, aims to ensure the city centre fulfils its role as the core commercial centre within the local government area.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Most committees involve Council in technical, secretarial or administration costs.  This is factored into operational budgets.

Risk Analysis:

There are no specific risks associated with the appointment of the committee members.  All members will be required to sign and comply with Council’s Code of Conduct.

Consultation:

A panel consisting of a Governance representative, Business Improvement representative and an external representative from the Audit and Risk committee was convened to assess the applications.  A short list was compiled for the community representative and short interviews were conducted.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Local Government Act (1993) s355 and s377

Implementation Date / Priority:

Immediate.

Conclusion:

Council adopts the recommendation to appoint new committee members to the CCMPC.

  


BS18/72       Coffs Coast State Park Trust Special Purpose Financial Report and Audit 2017-18

Author:                        Manager Holiday Parks and Reserves

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

MyCoffs:                      B.1 A thriving and sustainable local economy

Attachments:              ATT1  BS18/72   CCSPT Special Purpose Financial Report 2017-18  

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide Council with the Coffs Coast State Park Trust’s final audited Special Purpose Financial Statements for year ended 30 June 2018.  A copy of the Trust’s audited Special Purpose Financial Report is attached.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council receive and adopt the audited Special Purpose Financial Report for 2017-18 for the Coffs Coast State Park Trust.

 

Report

Description of Item:

The commencement of the Crown Land Management Act 2016 on 1 July 2018 resulted in the dissolution of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust (CCSPT).  The CCSPT entity has remained in place but only for the purposes of winding up with a deadline of 30 June 2019.  Council officers have fast-tracked this process with all Trust activities being completed by 30 September 2018.

 

This report brings to Council the final audited Special Purpose Financial Statements for year ended 30 June 2018 for the CCSPT.  Financial activities for the former Trust have been integrated into Council’s financial system as of 1 July 2018 and all future reporting of financial activities on Council managed Crown Land will be incorporated into Council’s financial reporting.

 

Table 1 provides a summary of the Income Statement for the Trust and makes comparison to the results from the previous financial year (2016-17).

 

The Trust had growth in its operating surplus from 5.6% in 2016-17 to 6.0% in 2017-18 despite a downturn in holiday park revenue and increases in labour costs. Increased grant funding revenue has offset the holiday park downturn and operating surplus was up on the back of reduced depreciation, amortisation and impairment, and reduced materials and contracts costs.

 

The holiday parks revenue reduction was attributable to a range of issues including an industry-wide decline in occupancy at ‘resort’ style parks like Park Beach Holiday Park, significant capital projects at Park Beach and Sawtell that saw products and services off-line during construction, and impacts from anti-social behaviour resulting in negative publicity.  A number of strategies have been implemented to address this downturn and early indications show a strong recovery in the 2018/19 financial year.

 


 

Table 1 - COFFS COAST STATE PARK TRUST COMPARATIVE INCOME STATEMENT 2018

 

 

2016-17

2017-18

Change

Revenue

 

 

 

User Charges and Fees

9,716,327

9,342,830

       (3.8%)

Investment Revenues

97,153

114,144

       17.5%

Other Revenues (Grants & Council Cont.)

985,566

1,543,740

       56.6%

 

 

 

 

Total Revenue

10,799,046

11,000,714

         1.9%

 

 

 

 

Expenditure

 

 

 

Labour Costs

3,562,180

3,869,312

         8.6%

Materials and Contracts

1,181,414

1,153,842

       (2.3%)

Depreciation, Amortisation & Impairment

1,786,652

1,440,759

     (19.4%)

Other Expenses

3,665,644

3,760,176

         2.6%

Loss on Disposal of Assets

0

113,863

    N/A

 

 

 

 

Total Expenditure

10,195,890

10,337,952

         1.4%

 

 

 

 

Operating Surplus

603,157

662,762

         9.9%

Operating Surplus %

5.6%

6.0%

 

 

 

Table 2 – COFFS COAST HOLIDAY PARKS CAPITAL EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2018

 

Item

Cost

Park Beach Pool Refurbishment

252,569

Park Beach Eastern Precinct

550,000

Villas at Park beach, Sawtell and Lakeside

1,225,000

‘The Hub’ @ Park Beach

111,540

Facility and Villa Refurbishments

356,700

Site Works including Road works

151,500

Woolgoolga Beach Redevelopment

337,000

Woolgoolga Beach Reception

230,950

 

Relevant Ratios

 

Operating Performance Ratio (OPR)

The OPR measures the achievement of containing operating expenditure within operating revenue.  The absolute minimum should be 0%.  The CCSPT OPR is 6.0%. 

 

Current Ratio (CR)

The CR measures the businesses ability to meet short term liabilities and is calculated as Current Assets/Current Liabilities.  The CCSPT CR is 1.61:1 and is considered acceptable for the type of business operations undertaken.

 

Debt Service Cover Ratio (DSR)

The DSR measures the availability of operating cash to service debt including interest and principle payments.  A minimum DSR for this type of operation should be 2.0.  The CCSPT DSR is 5.9.

Issues:

The audited Special Purpose Financial Statements will be the last report for the CCSPT.  All future reporting of activities on Council managed Crown Land will be incorporated into Council’s financial reporting regime.

Options:

This report is to enable Council, as the appointed Crown Land Manager for all reserves previously contained within the Coffs Coast State Park Trust, to receive and adopt the audited Special Purpose Financial Report 2017-18 for the CCSPT.  There no alternate options provided.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Holiday Parks and Reserves’ revenue generated within the Coffs Coast State Park is channelled back into the reserve system including environmental management of locations.  All parks are committed to environmental initiatives aimed at reducing their impact upon the environment.

•     Social

Holiday Parks and Reserves are important resources in meeting the recreational needs of the greater community.  Funds generated through the parks contribute to the development of social and recreational facilities within the reserve system.

•     Civic Leadership

The transition to the new Crown Land Management Act 2016 results in the dissolution of the CCSPT.  The new Act holds no requirement for Council, as Crown Land Manager, to present audited financial statements to Crown Lands.  However, it demonstrates good corporate governance to receive and adopt the financial report.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The Holiday Parks and Reserves are important tourist facilities drawing visitors to the region.  The flow on effect of visitation has a generally positive impact upon the economic performance of the region.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The Trust generates funds that are used within the reserves and contribute to the management and upkeep of the locations, reducing the demand on alternate funding sources, including Council’s general revenue.

Risk Analysis:

Under current operating conditions the business remains sustainable and is well equipped to meet existing financial obligations and provide ongoing financial contributions to the wider reserve system.

Consultation:

The operation of the business unit is a team effort with the enthusiastic support of all Council Groups being pivotal in their success.  Regular consultation is also undertaken with Department of Industry - Lands.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Council has previously received the Special Purpose Financial Report in its role as Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust under the provisions of the Crown Lands Act.  There is no requirement under the new Crown Land Management Act 2016 to receive separate reporting on Crown Land where Council is the appointed Crown Land Manager.  However, in this instance it is considered good corporate governance for Council to receive and adopt the Special Purpose Financial Report.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Nil.

Conclusion:

The business activities continue to operate at a sustainable level and provide sustainable funds for use within the reserves system.  Business performance is closely monitored and strategies and actions are appropriately amended to ensure the ongoing financial success of the business.

 


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BS18/73       Coffs Harbour Regional Boat Ramp Precinct Enhancement Committee - Final Report - Enhancements for the Coffs Harbour Regional Boat Ramp Precinct

Author:                        Manager Holiday Parks and Reserves

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

MyCoffs:                      A.2 An active, safe and healthy community

Attachments:              ATT1  BS18/73   Final Report - Enhancements for the Coffs Harbour Regional Boast Ramp Precinct

ATT2  BS18/73   Concept Plan - Proposed Upgrade Coffs Harbour Boat Ramp  

 

Executive Summary

On 12 April 2018 Council, as Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust, considered a report in response to representations from a collective of interested stakeholders under the banner of the Coffs Harbour Regional Boat Ramp Precinct Enhancement Committee (CHRBRPEC).  The CHRBRPEC had approached Council with a vision for the “creation of a first-class boat ramp precinct, that provides a safe launching, retrieval, and parking for trailered water craft, supplemented by a recreational area that has an amenities block, fish and boat cleaning facilities, for use by the local community and visitors to our beautiful coast”.  The vision focussed upon three main themes of safety, economic benefit and recreational amenity and established 11 key desired outcomes.

 

On 12 April 2018 Council resolved:

 

That Council, as Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust, provides in principle support for the vision of the Coffs Harbour Regional Boat Ramp Precinct Enhancement Committee and works with the Committee in the development of a concept plan for the precinct.

 

The CHRBRPEC undertook to provide Council, prior to the end of 2018, with an analysis of the precinct and prepare a concept plan that reflects the CHRBRPEC’s vision and key desired outcomes.  This report presents the CHRBRPEC’s Final Report – Enhancements for the Coffs Harbour Regional Boat Ramp Precinct (Attachment 1) and CHRBRPEC Concept Plan (Attachment 2).

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Note the report and concept plan provided by the Coffs Harbour Regional Boat Ramp Precinct Enhancement Committee (CHRBRPEC).

2.       Include the land based desired outcomes contained within the CHRBRPEC report in the preparation of the draft Plan of Management and any master planning for the Jetty4Shores.

3.       Engage with the Marine Infrastructure Development Office (MIDO) to include the maritime enhancements within MIDO’s development priorities.

4.       Actively lobby the State and Federal Governments to obtain their support for funding of ramp precinct enhancements.

5.       Support the establishment of, and actively participate in, a Regional Boat Ramp Precinct Working Group, with representatives of the Department of Premier and Cabinet, Coffs Harbour City Council, MIDO, Department of Industry - Crown Lands, the CHRBREC and other representatives as appropriate, to monitor and facilitate the progress in delivering ramp precinct enhancements.

6.       Thank the CHRBRPEC for their efforts and valued input.

 

Report

Description of Item:

On 12 April 2018 Council, as Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust, considered a report in response to representations from a collective of interested stakeholders under the banner of the Coffs Harbour Regional Boat Ramp Precinct Enhancement Committee (CHRBRPEC).  The CHRBRPEC had approached Council with a vision for the “creation of a first-class boat ramp precinct, that provides a safe launching, retrieval, and parking for trailered water craft, supplemented by a recreational area that has an amenities block, fish and boat cleaning facilities, for use by the local community and visitors to our beautiful coast”.  The vision focussed upon three main themes of safety, economic benefit and recreational amenity and established, via an initial strategy document, 11 key desired outcomes including:

 

1.    Enhanced boat ramp entrance including the provisioning of a ‘groin’ to reduce siltation and eliminate the need for constant dredging.  This enhancement would include consideration of other ramp options if the enhanced entrance design is not technically feasible.  These other options include building upon the ‘W.E. Smith’ ramp structures, or the provision of a new ramp in the south eastern corner of the harbour adjacent to the south wall.

2.    Widened bay and ramp area to accommodate two pontoons (double sided) with provision for 12 boats. (noting an earlier grant for another pontoon had been approved.)

3.    Six boat environmental wash down facility.

4.    More parking for cars, and boats and trailers including expanded area at the front of the now defunct Deep-Sea Fishing Club

5.    Toilet and shower/ change room facility including disabled usage capacity.

6.    Increased capacity for boat rigging and derigging.

7.    Security cameras, lighting and high visibility computerised illumination signs on sea conditions and current warnings.

8.    Enhanced environmental fish cleaning facility – waste disposal

9.    Alternate road access at the back of the now defunct Deep-Sea Fishing Club and Boambee beach.

10.  Recreational seating, tables BBQs

11.  Re design of the walking path.

 

On 12 April 2018 Council resolved:

 

That Council, as Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust, provides in principle support for the vision of the Coffs Harbour Regional Boat Ramp Precinct Enhancement Committee and works with the Committee in the development of a concept plan for the precinct.

 

The CHRBRPEC undertook to provide Council, prior to the end of 2018, with an analysis of the precinct and prepare a report and concept plan that reflects the CHRBRPEC’s vision and key desired outcomes.  The CHRBRPEC have been very active within the community during the preparation of their report and concept, including the conduct of a petition in support of boat ramp precinct enhancements that achieved 12,222 signatures and was tabled in NSW Parliament on 18 November 2018.

 

The report and concept (Attachment 1) contains 10 enhancements that closely align with the original strategy document prepared by the CHRBRPEC and include:

 

1.    Enhanced boat ramp entrance including the provisioning of a ‘groyne’ to reduce siltation and eliminate the need for constant dredging.  This enhancement would include consideration of other ramp options if the enhanced entrance design is not technically feasible.  These other options include building upon the ‘W.E. Smith’ ramp structures, or the provision of a new ramp in the south eastern corner of the harbour adjacent to the south wall.

2.    Widened bay and ramp area to accommodate two pontoons (double sided) with provision for 12 boats. (noting an earlier grant for another pontoon had been approved.)

3.    Six boat environmental wash down facility.

4.    More parking for cars, and boats and trailers including expanded area at the front of the now defunct Deep-Sea Fishing Club

5.    Toilet and shower/ change room facility including disabled usage capacity.

6.    Increased capacity for boat rigging and derigging.

7.    Security cameras, lighting and high visibility computerised illumination signs on sea conditions and current warnings.

8.    Enhanced environmental fish cleaning facility – waste disposal

9.    Recreational seating, tables BBQs

10.  Re design of the walking path.

 

The CHRBRPEC report provides additional rationale around these ten enhancements and also states that “a further enhancement, being the extension of Howard Street to Jordan Esplanade, whilst necessary, has been decoupled from the enhancements the Committee would like to see urgently resolved.”

 

Council officers and representatives from MIDO have undertaken preliminary investigations into the 10 enhancements and Howard Street extensions and a preliminary cost for the works is estimated at $7.5m (2018 $) for items 1 to 10 and a further $9.7m (2018 $) for the Howard Street extension to Jordan Esplanade.  The cost estimates for the maritime elements (items 1 and 2) were developed by MIDO and total $5.6m (2018 $) while the estimate for the land based elements (items 3-10) were developed by Council officers and total $1.95m (2018 $ with 20% contingency).  Item 7 has already been commenced and costs are being met through $95,000.00 in grant funding for safer boating and include additional dredging, CCTV cameras and lighting.  Further negotiations are underway with Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) and MIDO regarding a trial of electronic safety and information signage.

 

The CHRBRPEC report contains four recommendations:

 

1     The Council actively lobby the State and Federal Governments to obtain bipartisan support for funding of the ramp precinct enhancements.

2     The Council engage with the Marine Infrastructure Development Office (MIDO) to ensure that the maritime enhancements are included within MIDO’s development priorities.

3     The Council ensure that the ramp precinct enhancements contained in the report are incorporated into future development plans, including the Master Plan/s of Management for the Harbour Precinct.

4     The Council support the establishment of a Regional Boat Ramp Precinct Working Group, with representative/s of DPC, CHCC, MIDO, Crown Lands, CHRBREC and other representatives as appropriate, to monitor and facilitate the progress in delivering ramp precinct enhancements, and report on progress to Council and the relevant Minister every 6 months, until complete.

 

The recommendations in this Council report align with the intent of the CHRBRPEC report recommendations.

Issues:

There are several key issues that need to be considered in relation to the CHRBRPEC report and recommendations including:

 

1.    Future planning requirements to be undertaken by Council as the Crown Land Manager

 

Under the new Crown Land Management Act 2016, Council as the appointed Crown Land Manager for Part Reserve 140102 is required to develop a new Plan of Management, under the Local Government Act, for the reserve which captures the majority of the Jetty Foreshore precinct including the boat ramp.  The Plan of Management must be completed prior to 30 June 2021 and until that time or until a new Plan is adopted, the existing Crown Land Act Plan of Management remains in effect.  While the recommendations within the CHRBRPEC report align with the existing Plan of Management it would be prudent to ensure that the key desired outcomes are captured within the new Plan of Management and subjected to further community consultation prior to any major works being undertaken.  Further, the location will require a master plan to guide any development and ensure that the strategic directions established in the Plan of Management translate into deliverable outcomes.

 

2.    Community Consultation

 

The CHRBRPEC have undertaken considerable consultation with stakeholder groups and the community during the development of their report and concepts.  They were successful in achieving the minimum requirement of 10,000 signatures (12,222+ in total) enabling the petition to be tabled and debated in Parliament on 18 October 2018.  Despite the quality engagement work undertaken by the CHRBRPEC, Council will be required to undertake further community consultation prior to the adoption of any future planning and/or implementation of any major works within the precinct.

 

3.    The State Government Project Control Group (PCG)

 

The State Government has been undertaking a planning exercise at the Jetty Foreshores and includes the boat ramp precinct within the scope of the project.  The preliminary concept plan released as part of the GHD Community and Stakeholder Consultation Outcomes Report establishes that the boat ramp precinct remains a mix of maritime activities and open space/recreation.  However, the concept notes that “Alternate locations for critical maritime facilities may be considered in the further development of Concept Plans and Detailed Plans, subject to feasibility.”  This note is non-specific about what locations it pertains to and could potentially impact upon planning and future works within the boat ramp precinct.  Council is currently seeking further information from the PCG regarding future ‘critical maritime facilities’ and is also seeking confirmation regarding roles and responsibilities regarding the future management of the Jetty Foreshores as it relates to the Preliminary Concept Plan.

Options:

Council has the following options to consider:

 

1     Accept the recommendations and provide its support to the findings of the CHRBRPEC.

2     Amend the recommendations to change Council’s level of support of and/or agreement with the findings of the CHRBRPEC.

3     Reject the recommendations and take no further action in relation to this matter.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Elements of the existing boat ramp precinct do not provide optimal environmental outcomes, particularly with regards to fish cleaning and boat wash down facilities.  The enhancements proposed would see environmentally sustainable facilities installed that significantly improve the environmental outcomes for the location.

•     Social

The location plays a significant role in the social and recreational wellbeing of the broader community. In addition to direct benefits to recreational boaters and fishermen, the enhancements promote improved outcomes for a range of users at the location including the provision of equal access amenities and improved recreation facilities.  Safety is a key consideration within the CHRBRPEC concept plan with maritime enhancements specifically designed to reduce risks to boaters.  In addition, the plan also recommends improved public safety measures including CCTV, additional lighting and amended pedestrian access to minimise the interface between vehicles and pedestrians.

•     Civic Leadership

Council is charged with the management of the precinct and is obliged to develop a Plan of Management by 30 June 2021.  Utilising the quality work undertaken by the CHRBRPEC to inform the Draft Plan of Management and subjecting the plan to further community consultation demonstrates strong civic leadership.  Resolving to actively lobby the State and Federal Governments to obtain bipartisan support for funding of ramp precinct enhancements engaging with the Marine Infrastructure Development Office (MIDO) to ensure that the maritime enhancements are included within MIDO’s development priorities also demonstrate a commitment to public safety and risk management.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The economic benefit of recreational boating, fishing and access to the Solitary Island Marine Park are well understood, as are the economic benefits of improved public open space and the role it plays in activating the location.  It is envisaged that the proposed enhancements would have positive broader economic benefits to the community.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The recommendation will have implications upon the Delivery Program and Operational Plan.  The report provides some preliminary estimates for the enhancements but with the exception of grant funding for CCTV and lighting improvements, the enhancements are unfunded.  The recommendation does commit Council to actively lobbying State and Federal Government to secure funding for the enhancements as well as working with MIDO to ensure the maritime enhancements are included in their development priorities.  The maritime enhancements may have a positive impact upon maintenance costs associated with sand build-up but this outcome will not be known until appropriate studies and modelling have occurred.

Risk Analysis:

The recommendation does not carry a high level of risk at this stage.  The recommendation commits Council to including the enhancements in the future planning regimes, lobbying State and Federal Government for funding, engaging with MIDO regarding priorities and participating in the working group.  The highest risk identified at this stage is Council committing resources or funds towards progressing the enhancements without clarity from the State Government PCG in relation to defined roles and responsibilities within the precinct or establishing the impacts upon the proposed enhancements as a result of further plans for “alternate locations for critical maritime facilities.”

Consultation:

The CHRBRPEC has undertaken significant consultation during the development of their report.

 

Council officers have consulted internally and with MIDO officers in the development of this report.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Council is the appointed Crown Land Manager under the Crown Land Management Act 2016.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Implementation will be upon Council resolution.

Conclusion:

The CHRBRPEC should be congratulated on the work they have undertaken in delivering their report and concept plan to Council.  The recommended enhancements will have positive implications for the safety and wellbeing of the boating and general public, will deliver improved social and recreational outcomes to the community and act as a catalyst for economic growth.  They have elevated the issue at a Local, State and Federal level and garnered significant support for their proposed enhancements, including securing 12,222 plus signatures on a petition submitted to State Parliament.

 

Council can now consider incorporating the proposed enhancements into a new draft Plan of Management (under the Local Government Act 1993) and precinct Master Plan and seek further feedback and comment from the community in relation to the enhancements.  The CHRBRPEC makes four key recommendations and the resolution presented to Council in this report aligns with the four key recommendations.

 

 

 


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BS18/74       Coffs Harbour Regional Airport Governance and Management Options - Stage 2 Evaluation Report

Author:                        Director Business Services

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

MyCoffs:                      D.2 We have effective use of public resources.

Attachments:              ATT1  BS18/74   CONFIDENTIAL CHRA Governance / Management Options - Stage 2 Evaluation Report

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act as it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.  

 

Executive Summary

At its meeting on 23 November 2017, Council endorsed the undertaking of an options study to inform consideration of future governance and management options for Coffs Harbour Regional Airport (CHRA).

 

At its meeting on 28 June 2018, Council considered the report from the consultants. Council resolved to further investigate three models and seek valuation information to inform Council’s decision making.

 

The consultants have now submitted a further report (Confidential Attachment 1) exploring the three models and they have also included valuation information to assist in Council’s understanding of the financial consideration of the models.

 

The report recommends that the Airport Lease model is the most appropriate model to be implemented at CHRA.  By its nature, the model would create separation of operational and ongoing funding responsibility, deliver a financial windfall, and the opportunity to partner with a financially capable investor. Embarking on a controlled staged process gives Council the opportunity to withdraw if it is not satisfied with the early indications and adopt a full contract management model as a fall back.

 

In addition to the most recent consultant’s report, Council officers have been exploring the approach and outcomes of one recent airport lease arrangement being for the Sunshine Coast Airport in December 2017. The outcomes for Sunshine Coast Regional Council have been overwhelmingly positive.

 

The way forward recommended by officers is to progress the next stages of preparation and due diligence, and to undertake an expression of interest to formally test the market for an airport lease for Coffs Harbour Airport.  The outcome of the expression of interest will be reported to Council for consideration.  It should be noted that much of the preparation and due diligence work will also be required if Council, following the expression of interest, were to fall back to a full contract management option.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.    Progresses the Airport Lease model for the Coffs Harbour Airport to the next stages of preparation and due diligence, and undertake an expression of interest.

2.    Endorse the procurement of independent expert advisors to assist with advancing the airport lease process.

3.    Note that a further report on the outcome of the expression of interest will be provided to Council for consideration.

 

Report

Description of Item:

The Coffs Harbour Airport is currently managed through a mixed model with a Management Contract for the Airport Manager and the operations undertaken through a Council business unit.

 

At its meeting on 23 November 2017, Council endorsed the undertaking of an options study to inform consideration of future governance and management options for Coffs Harbour Regional Airport (CHRA).

 

At its meeting on 28 June 2018, Council considered the report from the consultants, The Airport Group.  The report set out a comprehensive list of options available through which a public infrastructure asset such as an airport can be operated and managed. Council resolved:

 

That Council undertakes further investigation of the Airport Management Contract, Leasehold and Transfer of the Airport Operations into a Council Owned Corporate Entity Models to support Council making a fully informed decision on the governance and management arrangements for Coffs Harbour Regional Airport, and this work is to include:

 

1.    That Council seek a formal valuation for the Coffs Harbour Airport offered for tenure with a long term lease.

2.    That Council seek a formal valuation for the proposed Enterprise Park at Christmas Bells Drive, exploring various leasehold and long term tenure options.

 

The consultants have now submitted a further report (Confidential Attachment 1) exploring the three models requested by Council in more detail.  They have also included valuation information to assist in Council’s understanding of the financial consideration of the models.

Issues:

The consultant’s initial report recommended undertaking further work on the following two options that emerged as preferred options having met the objectives for the future of the CHRA.  These two options were:

 

1.    Airport management contract with a third-party operator; and

2.    Long term lease of the Airport (and adjoining Enterprise Park) to a third-party investor/operator.

 

In addition, Council requested that additional advice was prepared with regards to the Corporatisation model.

The consultant’s current report provides more detail on the short list of governance options available to CHRA in order to assist Council to decide on the most appropriate way forward.

 

Airport Management Contract

 

This model is used extensively for the management of a range of assets and businesses including real estate, infrastructure, hotels and airports.  It is popular with both Government and private industry. An airport management contract can be for five years or longer, with options to extend. In total this represents a minimum commitment in the order of say ten years.

 

Financial Implications

An airport management contract achieves some of the stated objectives but does has some financial implications.  It is expected that a third party operator would charge a fee based on gross revenue. This would also impact Council financially in its annual recovery of airport administration costs and reduction of dividend payment. Financial details are included in the confidential attachment.

 

Implementation Timing and Cost

It is estimated that to run a properly controlled process to appoint and transition into an airport management contract would take approximately 10 months.  Legal fees, project management and other transition fees are estimated to cost up to $100,000.

 

Enterprise Park

The responsibility for funding the Enterprise Park would still rest with Council (approximately $24 million).  Whilst an airport management contract could include the requirement to oversee the development and marketing of the Enterprise Park, this would come at an additional cost to the management fee outlined above.

 

Airport Lease and Operation

 

The airport lease model is a very popular governance model for airports and has been adopted at over 24 capital city and regional airports across Australia.  The key reasons have been: the ability to transfer the ongoing capital expenditure commitments, fully remove the operational and regulatory risks of running an airport, and obtain an upfront capital injection to Council.

 

As set out in the consultant’s initial report only the leasing option met all of the stated objectives agreed with the CHRA Focus Group and briefed with Council for the future of CHRA.

 

Financial Implications

Lease of the airport (including the Enterprise Park) would create a financial windfall to Council through the payment of an upfront lease premium. In addition, it would relieve Council of the future requirements to fund the ongoing capital expenditure requirements of the airport. Financial details are included in the confidential attachment.

 

Implementation Timing and Cost

It is estimated that to undertake a controlled process for the lease of the airport would take approximately 9 to 12 months.  The process can be staged with decision points at each stage.  Council can withdraw from the process at any stage until a final contract is entered into.

 

The costs related to the initial preparation and due diligence stages are estimated at $100,000; however, this will depend on the outcome of a procurement process. Estimated costs and fees for future stages of the process are detailed in the confidential attachment.

 

Other Benefits

An airport lessee would be expected to be properly capitalised and motivated to continue to develop the airport and encourage regional business development.  The benefit of airport investment for institutional investors is the ability to continue to invest additional capital over the life of the investment.

 

CHRA offers a range of additional investment avenues including:

 

·      Regional Development:

It is in the lessee’s best interest to stimulate activity through the airport.  Additional services, regional marketing, regional event sponsorship, airport efficiency, airline partnerships, tourism marketing support are areas that airport lessees have participated in historically.

 

·      Enterprise Park:

In addition to the approximate $24 million of capital required to undertake the civil works, there is the potential to invest in building development in the Enterprise Park.  Historically this has been the approach by airport lessees at other airports.  The Enterprise Park could accommodate approximately $200 million of building development.

 

·      International Operations:

Facilitating international operations into CHRA would require significant investment to the airport’s infrastructure (runways, taxiways, aprons and terminal and border security facilities).  Preliminary assessment estimates this in the range of $30 million to $50 million, plus the commitment from management to undertake sustained route marketing to international carriers.

 

Realising these investment opportunities with ratepayer and other public monies may be considered imprudent from a risk perspective.  However, private investment from an airport lessee with a more commercial risk appetite is a realistic approach to maximising the take-up of these opportunities and taking Coffs Harbour Airport to the next level.

 

Airport Corporatisation

 

Corporatisation of local government assets is not common in Australia and has only been used for three airports, of which one is actively looking at alternative models.  For a range of reasons outlined in their report, the consultants do not believe that Corporatisation is an appropriate model for CHRA.

 

Airport Valuation

 

Details of the enterprise value of the airport (including Enterprise Park) are detailed in Appendix A of the confidential attachment.  The airport lease model provides the most favourable outcome based on a net present value assessment.

 

Consultant’s Recommendation

 

The consultant’s current report recommends that the Airport Lease model is the most appropriate model to be implemented at CHRA.  By its nature, the model would create separation of operational and ongoing funding responsibility, deliver a financial windfall, and the opportunity to partner with a financially capable investor.

 

Embarking on a controlled staged process gives Council the opportunity to withdraw if it is not satisfied with the early indications and adopt a full contract management model as a fall back.

 

Other Research

 

In addition to the most recent consultant’s report, Council officers have been exploring the approach and outcomes of one recent airport lease arrangement being for the Sunshine Coast Airport in December 2017.  This example is particularly relevant to Coffs Harbour City Council given some our similarities and possible opportunities.  A briefing was provided to Council on 30 October 2018 and the outcomes for Sunshine Coast Regional Council have been overwhelmingly positive.

 

Way Forward

 

The way forward recommended by officers is to progress the next stages of preparation and due diligence, and to undertake an expression of interest to formally test the market for an airport lease for Coffs Harbour Airport. The outcome of the expression of interest will be reported to Council for consideration.  It should be noted that much of the preparation and due diligence work will also be required if Council, following the expression of interest, were to fall back to a full contract management option.

Options:

In relation to this report Council has the following options.

 

1.    Adopt the recommendations provided to Council and proceed with the next stages of preparation and due diligence, and the undertaking of an expression of interest.  A further report of the outcome of the expression of interest will be provided to Council for consideration.

2.    Amend the recommendation changing the scope of the next stages of the airport lease process or by choosing another governance model to pursue.  The recommended scope of the next stages has been proposed to take the process to the next critical decision point for Council.  Choosing another governance model is not supported by the consultants’ findings and is also not recommended by officers until the outcome of airport lease expression of interest is considered by Council.

3.    Reject the recommendation provided to Council.  This option will not provide Council with a way forward to adopt a more effective governance model for Coffs Harbour Airport.  The risks previously identified in the current model will remain.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental impacts as a result of the recommendation in this report to progress the airport lease model to the next stages of the process.

•     Social

There are no social impacts as a result of the recommendation in this report to progress the airport lease model to the next stages of the process.

•     Civic Leadership

The evaluation of alternative governance and management options for CHRA on an evidence-based approach demonstrates a strategic approach to addressing existing issues and long term requirements to ensure the continued growth and prosperity of the airport.  This approach is consistent with the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan objective:

 

-      D2.1 We effectively manage the planning and provision of regional public services and infrastructure.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The ongoing growth of CHRA will continue to place demands on Council’s financial and staff resources.  Addressing the long term governance and management arrangements for CHRA will ensure that the airport can continue its contribution to Council, services to the community and contribution to the economic growth of the region.  The consultant’s report identifies several investment and growth opportunities that the airport lease model would support, being:

 

-      Business development;

-      Enterprise Park; and

-      International operations.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The cost of progressing the airport lease model to the next stages of preparation and due diligence, and undertaking an expression of interest is estimated to be in the order of $100,000 and can be funded from the airport business unit’s existing budget. The final cost is dependent on the procurement process to be undertaken.

 

Initial financial analysis and valuation information is included in the consultant’s report.  The actual financial benefits will be more accurately known once airport lease due diligence and expression of interest process is undertaken.

Risk Analysis:

The current governance and management arrangements have Council as the owner and operator carrying the full risk associated with CHRA.  The risk management objectives used in the initial study specifically evaluated model options against their ability to minimise Council’s exposure to operational, financial, management and compliance risks.

 

The airport lease model minimises Council’s risk exposure and also provides a mechanism to advance important investment and growth opportunities without sole reliance on ratepayers and other public funds. Providing Council decision points at stages through the process also ensures that progress is made based on current and factual information.

Consultation:

During this second stage of model evaluation two workshop briefings have been provided to Councillors and the Airport Focus Group has been updated on progress.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

CHRA’s land holdings are freehold property classified as operational land.  The land holdings are subject to a Deed of Agreement with the Commonwealth.  These aspects have been taken into account. Regulatory objectives were also used in the initial study to evaluate model options.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Once Council adopts the recommendation, independent expert advisors will be procured to assist with advancing the airport lease for the Coffs Harbour Airport.  It is expected that the initial stages, including the expression of interest will take about 6 months.

Conclusion:

Exploring the long term governance and management options provides an evidence-based approach to assessing the best option moving forward.  This has been progressed through an initial options study and a further evaluation report undertaken by consultants.

 

The consultant’s recommendation of the airport lease model for Coffs Harbour Airport is recommended to Council to be progressed to the next stages of preparation and due diligence, and the undertaking of an expression of interest to test the market.  Independent expert advisors will be procured to assist and the outcome of the expression of interest will be reported to Council for consideration.

 

  


SC18/44       Draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy Strategic Approach

Author:                        Senior Planner/Urban Designer

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      C.1 Liveable neighbourhoods with a defined identity

Attachments:              ATT1  SC18/44   Draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy Strategic Approach  

 

Executive Summary

In August 2013, Council commenced a review and update of its Local Growth Management Strategy to ensure that it continues to meet the needs of Coffs Harbour and its residents moving forward to 2036. The initial stages of the review process included the preparation of a Land Capacity Assessment Audit; the development of Issues and Options Papers for residential and rural land uses; and extensive community consultation.

In 2015, Council endorsed a scope for the Local Growth Management Strategy review process; and in 2016 subsequently endorsed the engagement of consultants to prepare a new Residential Lands Strategy and Rural Lands Strategy for Coffs Harbour. 

The release of the North Coast Regional Plan 2036 in 2017 has required an alteration to the scope for the Local Growth Management Strategy review process to ensure that the directions and actions contained within the North Coast Regional Plan are satisfied.

The revised scope for the review process comprises the preparation of one Local Growth Management Strategy with various chapters relating to land use types within the Coffs Harbour LGA. The review process will also include a review of the introductory chapters of the Local Growth Management Strategy. Each of the separate land use chapters will be reported to Council in stages as they are prepared.

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement of a revised scope for the Local Growth Management Strategy review process; as well as endorsement to publicly exhibit the first four chapters of the draft Strategy containing the ‘Strategic Approach’ for growth within the Coffs Harbour LGA to 2036.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.     Endorse the revised scope for the Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy review process.

2.     Endorse the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy Strategic Approach – Chapters 1 to 4 (Attachment 1).

3.     Proceed to community engagement through public exhibition of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy Strategic Approach – Chapters 1 to 4 for a minimum period of 28 days.

4.     Note that a further report will be brought back to Council for consideration of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy – Chapters 1 to 4.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Local Growth Management Strategies provide an agreed approach between Councils and the NSW Department of Planning and Environment (DPE) to land use management and change within Council areas. They essentially inform the location and extent of land use zones within Council areas; identify how and where growth is going to occur; and inform other key Council documents that influence (or are influenced by) the management of land use growth.

At its Ordinary Meeting of 22 August 2013, Council endorsed a review and update of the Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy (Our Living City Settlement Strategy) by the following resolution:

1.   That Coffs Harbour City Council endorse the Local Growth Management Strategy Review Project Plan – Stage 1 (Attachment 1).

2.   That Coffs Harbour City Council endorse the Consultant Brief Request for Quotation for the Land Capacity Assessment Audit (Attachment 2).

3.   That Coffs Harbour City Council engage an appropriately qualified consultant to prepare a Land Capacity Assessment Audit.

The Land Capacity Assessment Audit was completed in October 2014 and endorsed by Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 12 March 2015 in conjunction with its endorsement of a scope for the Local Growth Management Strategy review process, by the following resolution:

1.   Council note the findings of the Local Growth Management Strategy Review Stage 1 Land Capacity Assessment Audit (Attachment 1) and Local Growth Management Strategy Review Stage 1 Issues Report (Attachment 2).

2.   Council confirm Stage 2 of the Local Growth Management Strategy Review as being the Residential Strategy.

3.   Council confirm Stage 3 of the Local Growth Management Strategy Review as being the Rural Lands Strategy.

4.   Council confirm Stage 4 of the Local Growth Management Strategy Review as being the Industrial Lands Strategy.

5.   A further report be presented to Council outlining the framework for the Local Growth Management Strategy Review which will include detailed project plans for both the Local Growth Management Strategy Stage 2 - Residential Strategy and Local Growth Management Strategy Stage 3 - Rural Lands Strategy

Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 28 May 2015, further resolved to endorse elements of the Local Growth Management Strategy review process through the following resolution:

1.   That Council endorse the Stage 2 Local Growth Management Strategy Review - Coffs Harbour Residential Strategy 2015 Project Plan and endorse the Consultant Brief Request for Quotation for the Coffs Harbour Residential Strategy 2015 Phase 1 – Issues and Options Paper.

2.   That Council endorse the Stage 3 Local Growth Management Strategy Review - Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy 2015 Project Plan and endorse the Consultant Brief Request for Quotations for the Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy 2015 Phase 1 – Issues and Options Paper.

3.   That Council engage appropriately qualified consultants to prepare both the draft Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy 2015 Phase 1 – Issues and Options Paper and the draft Coffs Harbour Residential Lands Strategy 2015 Phase 1 – Issues and Options Paper.

4.   That a further report be presented to Council prior to exhibition of the draft Issues and Options Papers for both the Residential Strategy 2015 and the Rural Lands Strategy 2015.

In 2017, consultants were engaged in accordance with items 2 and 3 of the above resolution to prepare a draft Residential Lands Strategy and draft Rural Lands Strategy for Coffs Harbour.

The release of the North Coast Regional Plan in 2017 has resulted in the need for a revised scope for the Local Growth Management Strategy review process to ensure that the directions and actions contained within the North Coast Regional Plan are satisfied.

The revised scope for the Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy review process will comprise the preparation of one Local Growth Management Strategy with a number of chapters relating to various land use types within the Coffs Harbour LGA. The scope for achieving this outcome is as follows:

1.   Land Capacity Assessment Audit (completed)

2.   Residential Lands Issues and Options Paper (completed)

3.   Rural Lands Issues and Options Paper (completed)

4.   Revised Strategic Approach (population analysis, supply and demand analysis, growth philosophy and program) (subject of this report)

5.   Rural Lands Review (subject of separate report to Council)

6.   Large Lot Residential Lands Review (underway)

7.   Residential Lands Review (underway)

8.   Employment Lands Review incorporating business and industrial land uses (to commenced in 2019)

9.   Tourist Lands Review (to commence in 2019)

10. Infrastructure (including Future Transport Strategy for Coffs Harbour) (underway)

11. 2050 and Beyond

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement of this revised scope for the Local Growth Management Strategy review process; as well as endorsement to exhibit the first four chapters of the draft Strategy containing the ‘Strategic Approach’ for growth within the Coffs Harbour LGA to 2036 (Attachment 1).

Issues:

Release of the North Coast Regional Plan 2036

The release of the North Coast Regional Plan 2036 in 2017 has resulted in the need for a revised scope for the Local Growth Management Strategy review process to ensure that the directions and actions contained within the North Coast Regional Plan are satisfied. This report seeks Council’s endorsement of a revised review process to address this issue.

Strategic Approach

The draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy provides a twenty year vision for future land uses in the Coffs Harbour LGA and addresses the vision and directions outlined in the North Coast Regional Plan 2036. The revised Strategy, once finalised and adopted by Council, is required to be endorsed by NSW DPE and will inform the preparation of Local Environmental Plans and updates to Council’s Development Control Plan.

The Strategic Approach comprises population analysis, supply and demand, preferred growth model, and delivery of the preferred growth model. The issues associated with these elements are discussed as follows:

·     Population Analysis

NSW DPE has estimated that by 2036 Coffs Harbour is projected to grow by an additional 23,687 people to 92,650. The most significant change will be an increase in the number of persons aged over 60, which represent 30% of the projected growth. The implications associated with this change will be a demand for housing types to cater for couples without dependents and the need for specific lifestyle facilities to support ageing.

Section 4.5 of the draft Strategy (Directions, Actions and Implementation) addresses the projected demand for specific housing types and initiatives required to support ageing in place.

·     Supply and Demand

The Land Capacity Assessment Audit (2014) and the more recent audit of residential land undertaken by Elton Consulting in 2018 demonstrates that the anticipated population growth within the Coffs Harbour LGA to 2036 can be accommodated within the existing urban footprint. These findings are significant as they demonstrate that the MyCoffs vision, themes and objectives can be fulfilled, particularly the objective to focus population growth within the existing developed footprint.

The preferred growth model within the draft Local Growth Management Strategy is based on a compact city approach to guide future development within existing urban areas and within previously identified growth areas within the LGA.

·     Preferred Growth Model

The compact city growth model within the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy is focused on urban consolidation in existing urban areas with little expansion of additional residential zoned land. This model differs from traditional land use planning where large urban release areas are often identified to cater for future population growth.

The Coffs Harbour community, as part of the development of Council’s MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan and during community consultation undertaken for this project, have overwhelmingly supported a compact urban development model to maximise environmental, social and economic sustainability.

·     Delivery of Preferred Growth Model

The Compact City Program contained within the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy will be delivered through various infill and renewal initiatives in targeted locations across the LGA and by optimising greenfield areas that have been identified within Councils existing growth strategy since 2008 which have not yet been realised.

Delivery of infill, renewal and growth areas will be supported by locality specific precinct planning and the development of Place Manuals for strategic localities in accordance with the Placemaking Criteria provided within Section 3.3.2 of the Strategy.

Options:

Council has two options available to progress this matter:

1.   Adopt the recommendations of this report and proceed to community engagement through public exhibition of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy – Chapters 1 to 4 (Attachment 1).

Comment: This option is responsive to broad community expectation.

2.   Resolve not to proceed with the public exhibition of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy – Chapters 1 to 4 (Attachment 1).

Comment: This option is not consistent with Council’s position to undertake a review of the Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy and will result in an outdated growth strategy that does not reflect the vision of Council’s MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.

This report recommends that Council pursue Option 1 as outlined above.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Chapters 1 to 4 of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy present a strategic direction for Coffs Harbour which is based on environmentally sustainable growth in the LGA. This reflects Council’s long term strategic vision for the City as endorsed in the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.

•     Social

Social impacts associated with managing socially sustainable increases in population growth until 2036, and evolving housing and accommodation needs, have been highlighted throughout the development of Chapters 1 to 4 of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy. This is also reflected in Council’s long term strategic vision as identified in the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.

•     Civic Leadership

Chapters 1 to 4 of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy achieve the following objectives in the My Coffs Community Strategic Plan:

-     C1.1 We create liveable spaces that are beautiful and appealing; and

-     C1.2 We undertake development that is environmentally, socially and economically responsible.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy aims to provide a coordinated, strategic and planned approach to cater for future growth. This will assist the orderly and efficient development of the city and promote investment, economic activity and regional services.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy ‘Strategic Approach’ includes a number of actions to achieve the Goals, Directions and Actions of the North Coast Regional Plan 2036 and Council’s MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan. Many of these actions in the Strategy are not funded therefore implementation of these actions is subject to funding through either Council’s Delivery Program or through grant applications or other initiatives.

Risk Analysis:

The draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy strategic approach will be placed on public exhibition prior to its final adoption by Council, thereby providing an opportunity for stakeholder and community engagement and thus reducing Council’s risk.

Consultation:

Extensive community consultation has been undertaken as part of the development of Chapters 1 to 4 of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy as follows:

-     Online survey from 23 March to 30 April 2017 with 258 responses;

-     Post card distribution and drop off for quick feedback with 165 responses;

-     Workshop 1: Saturday 1 April 2017, Coramba General Store and Providore, 31A Gale Street Coramba;

-     Workshop 2: Saturday 1 April 2017, Rustic Mezedes, 16 Market Street Woolgoolga;

-     Jetty Markets drop in sessions Sunday 2 April 2017, Coffs Harbour; and

-     Workshop 3: Sunday 2 April 2017, 63 First Avenue, Sawtell.

Feedback was specifically elicited on the following matters:

-     land use and development outcomes in local neighbourhoods;

-     supporting jobs and business opportunities in local neighbourhoods;

-     improving the quality of the urban environment and making local neighbourhoods more people-friendly;

-     what makes the character of local neighbourhoods unique or special; and

-     comments and suggestions for consideration by Council for local areas and the broader LGA.

Residents from over twenty three Coffs Harbour suburbs provided their feedback, with the most responses received from residents of the suburb of Coffs Harbour.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The objectives and desired outcomes of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy Strategic Approach is to assist in the delivery of the vision, aims and objectives of the North Coast Regional Plan 2036 and Council’s MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.

The draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy Strategic Approach is required to be endorsed by NSW Planning and Environment and will inform the preparation of Local Environmental Plans and updates to Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan 2015.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Should Council adopt the preferred recommendation of this report, public exhibition of Chapters 1 to 4 of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy will be undertaken for an extended period to 8 February 2019. There is no statutory minimum exhibition period for a Local Growth Management Strategy. An extended period of exhibition to 8 February 2019 is proposed due to the strategic significance of the document.

A further report will be put to Council to provide feedback on any submissions received during the public exhibition process and to seek endorsement of the final Chapters 1 to 4 of the Strategy. Endorsement from NSW DPE of the Strategic Approach would then be required prior to the implementation of any of the actions.

Conclusion:

The draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy Strategic Approach Chapters 1-4 (Attachment 1) encapsulates the outcomes of extensive consultation with the community in relation to the growth of Coffs Harbour to 2036. This draft document provides a long term vision for future land uses in the Coffs Harbour LGA, and addresses the vision, directions and actions outlined in the North Coast Regional Plan 2036 and MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement of a revised scope for the Local Growth Management Strategy review process and endorsement to exhibit the first four chapters of the draft Strategy containing the ‘Strategic Approach’ for growth within the Coffs Harbour LGA to 2036.

 


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SC18/45       Draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy Chapter 5 - Rural Lands

Author:                        Senior Planner/Urban Designer

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      B.1 A thriving and sustainable local economy

Attachments:              ATT1  SC18/45   Draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy - Chapter 5 Rural Lands

ATT2  SC18/45   Intensive Plant Agriculture Discussion Paper November 2018  

 

Executive Summary

In August 2013, Council commenced a review and update of its Local Growth Management Strategy to ensure that it meets the needs of Coffs Harbour and its residents moving forward to 2036. This report relates to a review of rural lands within the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area (LGA), which has been undertaken as part of the broader update of Council’s Local Growth Management Strategy.

The initial stages of the rural lands review process included the preparation of an issues and options paper for rural lands; preparation of a policy directions paper, and extensive community consultation. In 2015, Council endorsed the engagement of consultants to prepare a draft Rural Lands Strategy for Coffs Harbour as part of the second stage of the rural lands review process. Further, in November 2016, Council resolved to appoint a Section 355 Agricultural Advisory Committee to provide advice towards the preparation of a draft Rural Lands Strategy.

Through a Notice of Motion in November 2017, Council also resolved to prepare a draft report to explore feasible mitigation measures in relation to Intensive Plant Agriculture to support sustainable land use and reduce land use conflicts within the Coffs Harbour LGA.

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement to publicly exhibit Chapter 5 – Rural Lands (Attachment 1) of the draft Local Growth Management Strategy and an associated discussion paper relating to Intensive Plant Agriculture (Attachment 2).

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.     Endorse the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy – Chapter 5 Rural Lands (Attachment 1) and Intensive Plant Agriculture Discussion Paper (Attachment 2).

2.     Proceed to community engagement through public exhibition of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy – Chapter 5 Rural Lands and Intensive Plant Agriculture Discussion Paper for a minimum period of 28 days.

3.     Note that a further report will be brought back to Council for consideration of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy – Chapter 5 Rural Lands and Intensive Plant Agriculture Discussion Paper.

 

Report

Description of Item:

The history of the development of the Rural Lands Strategy has been addressed in a separate report to Council in relation to the strategic approach taken for the Local Growth Management Strategy overall.

The project commenced in 2015 with Council engaging a consultant to prepare a draft Issues and Options Discussion Paper for Phase 1 of the Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy. At its Ordinary Meeting of 14 July 2016, Council resolved to:

1.    Endorse the attached Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy Phase 1 – Draft Issues and Options Discussion Paper, Background Report and Community Workshop Outcomes and place on public exhibition for a period of 28 days.

2.    Receive a report back on the Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy Phase 1 – Draft Issues and Options Discussion Paper, following the exhibition period.

In accordance with Item 2 of this resolution, Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 24 November 2016 received an update on the draft Rural Lands Strategy, including the findings of the public exhibition of an Issues and Options Paper. At that meeting, Council resolved to appoint an Agricultural Advisory Committee through the following resolution:

That Council:

1.    Note the findings of the public exhibition of the Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy Phase 1 Draft Issues and Options Paper, Background Report and Community Workshop Outcomes (Attachment 1).

2.    Undertake a procurement process to select appropriately qualified consultants to prepare Phase 2 – Draft Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy in accordance with the Project Scope (Attachment 3).

3.    Establish a Section 355 Agricultural Advisory Committee in accordance with the attached Terms of Reference (Attachment 4).

In response to Item 2 of this resolution, Elton Consulting were engaged to prepare a draft Rural Lands Strategy. An Agricultural Advisory Committee was established in accordance with Item 3 of this resolution. This committee has met regularly since July 2017 to provide input into the rural lands review process.

Council later, at its Ordinary Meeting of 9 November 2017, made the following resolution through a Notice of Motion (NOM 17/18) to address emerging issues in relation to Intensive Plant Agriculture:

1.    That Council staff prepare a draft report to explore feasible mitigation measures in relation to intensive horticulture as stipulated in the LEP 2013 as it stands in the LGA to support sustainable land use and reduce land use conflict in the LGA.

2.    This could include, but not be limited to, a discussion of exemptions, buffers, water storage and whole farm plans.

3.    That the draft report will be provided to the CHCC Agricultural Advisory Committee for discussion, comment and input to assist in the development of the Rural Lands strategy;

4.    That the CHCC Agricultural Advisory Committee input be included in the Rural Lands strategy that goes on public exhibition.

A draft Discussion Paper in relation to Intensive Plant Agriculture has been prepared in response to Item 1 and Item 2 of this resolution (Attachment 2). It has been provided to the Agricultural Advisory Committee for discussion, comment and input in accordance with Item 3 of this resolution. The Agricultural Advisory Committee has had input into the preparation of Chapter 5 - Rural Lands of the Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy in accordance with Item 4 of the above resolution.

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement to publicly exhibit both Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy and the associated Intensive Plant Agriculture Discussion Paper.

Issues:

Extensive community consultation undertaken as part of the rural lands review process identified a number of issues associated with rural land use. A summary of these issues is provided as follows.

-     Land Use Conflict

Rural lands in the Coffs Harbour LGA encompass a broad range of activities, with sometimes competing and conflicting interests. The issues associated with rural land uses can be categorised into the following themes.

§ Economy – diversifying land uses; economic opportunity; visitors (tourism); right to farm; the importance of farming; Intensive Plant Agriculture (eg. blueberries); and minimum lot sizes for agriculture.

§ Community – infrastructure; demographics; minimum lot size; additional dwellings, Intensive Plant Agriculture; and land use conflict.

§ Environment – land use; environmental zones; topography; native vegetation/biodiversity; water use; weeds; Intensive Plant Agriculture; and Aboriginal Cultural Heritage.

§ Governance – complexity of policy and process; the need for clear and transparent policy; and the need for user friendly documentation.

Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy provides a discussion for each of the themes and associated issues. Recommended actions are also proposed to mitigate the impacts from each of the above issues.

-     Rural Land Uses

A rural land use survey was undertaken during the initial stage of the rural lands review. The results of the survey revealed that the largest proportion of rural land use relates to ‘rural living’ at 67%, with irrigated plants (mostly bananas and berries) making up approximately 10% of rural land uses, extensive agriculture (cattle grazing etc.) 12%, public uses 4%; and commercial uses 3%.

For the purposes of the survey, ‘rural living’ refers to residents on land within Zone RU2 Rural Landscape who don’t farm their land on a full time basis and who merely seek a rural lifestyle. This is an important statistic to inform Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy, as the needs of this sector must be adequately addressed given that it makes up the largest proportion of rural land uses.

-     Intensive Plant Agriculture

Significant consideration has been given to the issues associated with Intensive Plant Agriculture (eg. blueberries) during the rural lands review process. Land use conflict associated with Intensive Plant Agriculture has consistently been raised during community consultation undertaken for the rural lands review process. Complaints in relation to this issue are also received by Council on a regular basis.

The issues raised in relation to Intensive Plant Agriculture include the following and are discussed in more detail within the Discussion Paper (Attachment 2):

§ pollution (air, noise, water);

§ adverse impacts on waterways (including estuaries and the marine environment);

§ spray drift;

§ excessive water use;

§ storage of hazardous chemicals;

§ visual impacts (netting);

§ illegal clearing of native vegetation;

§ lack of employee facilities;

§ lack of accommodation for seasonal workforce;

§ increased and unmanaged traffic movements and parking; and

§ adverse impacts on ‘rural living’.

The Discussion Paper and draft Chapter 5 seek to address the issues associated with Intensive Plant Agriculture by recommending that various incentives are investigated to reduce impacts from existing Intensive Plant Agriculture developments and to work with the industry to achieve improved outcomes from this land use. They also provide a number of options for amendments which could be made to planning controls within Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2013.

Draft Chapter 5 – Rural Lands recommends that Council’s planning controls are amended to require approval for new Intensive Plant Agriculture developments, with exempt criteria (this would enable compliant Intensive Plant Agriculture developments to proceed without any approval from Council). This will enable appropriate mitigation measures to be applied to reduce land use conflicts with neighbouring land, noting that the largest proportion of rural land use relates to ‘rural living’. Existing Intensive Plant Agriculture developments would not be impacted by this recommendation as continuing use rights would apply. In addition, one of the proposed actions within draft Chapter 5 – Rural Lands is to work with relevant industry bodies to determine relevant exempt development criteria for Intensive Plant Agriculture within Zone RU2 Rural Landscape.

One of the benefits of requiring development consent for Intensive Plant Agriculture is that it provides a proactive opportunity to prevent issues before they occur and will support best-practice farm management holistically across all issues and potentially at a catchment and LGA scale.

The development consent process provides a degree of certainty for both the farmer and the community. It will provide an opportunity to address the particular set of considerations for Intensive Plant Agriculture to ensure the highest industry standards are continuously met; to address the concerns of the wider community; manage off site environmental impacts; and mitigate land use conflict through a transparent approval process. Requiring approval for Intensive Plant Agriculture developments would allow this industry to continue and thrive whilst minimising associated impacts.

-     Agricultural Advisory Committee

Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 24 November 2016 resolved to appoint an Agricultural Advisory Committee for discussion, comment and input to assist in the development of a Rural Lands Strategy. The Agricultural Advisory Committee was formed at the time of the commencement of the second stage of the rural lands review process, with the following terms of reference:

1.   Provide input into issues arising during the preparation of the draft Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy.

2.   Provide stakeholder advice on agricultural and rural land use related topics.

3.   Provide a link between the community and Council.

4.   Ensure adequate dialogue and liaison between relevant authorities and stakeholders.

The Agricultural Advisory Committee has met regularly to discuss and provide input into draft Chapter 5 – Rural Lands, with much discussion on the proposal to amend Council’s planning controls to address impacts associated with Intensive Plant Agriculture development. It should be highlighted the minutes of the Agricultural Advisory Committee meeting of 6 June 2018 state ‘It was noted that there was a consensus that the draft RLS was not supported by most members of the AAC.’

While this view is duly noted and has been considered as part of the rural lands review process, the recommendations provided within Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy have been developed to address issues raised by all rural land stakeholders and are supported by significant evidence base.

-     Mitigation Measures in Relation to Intensive Horticulture

Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 9 November 2017 resolved to prepare a draft report to explore feasible mitigation measures in relation to intensive horticulture to support sustainable land use and reduce land use conflict in the LGA. As previously mentioned in this report, a draft Discussion Paper in relation to Intensive Plant Agriculture has been prepared in response to this resolution (Attachment 2).

The recommendations provided in the Discussion Paper are as follows:

§ Continue to work with leading industry bodies and advisory groups to implement measures addressed in the Australian Blueberry Grower Association Code of Conduct, including incentives to achieve good practice.

§ Include an action within draft Chapter 5 – Rural Lands to amend Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2013 to require development consent for Intensive Plant Agriculture in zone RU2 Rural Landscape; and consider criteria that, if met, would enable a development for Intensive Plant Agriculture to proceed as exempt development (i.e. no approval required from Council).

§ Work with relevant industry bodies to determine exempt development criteria for intensive plant agriculture within Zone RU2 Rural Landscape that support the Blueberry Code of Practice and other best management practice programs.

§ Consider an amendment to Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan 2015 to include specific development controls for Intensive Plant Agriculture, including the requirements for neighbour notification.

§ Continue to work with agencies including the NSW Department of Planning and Environment to deliver updated important farmland mapping for Coffs Harbour.

§ Continue to work with Industry and Government to explore, encourage and fund innovation to achieve best practice in Intensive Plant Agriculture.

Options:

Council has several options available to progress this matter, including:

1.   Adopt the recommendations of this report and publicly exhibit Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy (Attachment 1) and the Intensive Plant Agriculture Discussion Paper (Attachment 2).

Comment: This option is responsive to broad community expectation.

2.   Resolve not to proceed with the public exhibition of Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy (Attachment 1) and Discussion Paper on Intensive Plant Agriculture (Attachment 2).

Comment: This option is not consistent with Council’s position to undertake a review of rural lands as part of broader review of its Local Growth Management Strategy and would result in the continuation of significant impacts associated with rural land use conflict.

This report recommends that Council pursue Option 1 as outlined above.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy seeks to address environmental issues currently being experienced within rural areas of the Coffs Harbour LGA. This reflects Council’s long term strategic vision for Coffs Harbour as endorsed in the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan to “ensure that land use planning and development protects the value and benefits provided by the natural environment”.

•     Social

Draft Chapter 5 – Rural Lands seeks to address social impacts associated with living in rural communities. The recommended actions contained within draft Chapter 5 – Rural Lands also reflect Council’s long term strategic vision for Coffs Harbour in the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan “to undertake development that is environmentally, socially and economically responsible”.

•     Civic Leadership

Draft Chapter 5 – Rural Lands seeks to achieve the following objectives within Council’s My Coffs Community Plan:

-     We create liveable spaces that are beautiful and appealing (C1.1);

-     We undertake development that is environmentally, socially and economically responsible (C1.2);

-     We protect the diversity of our environment (C2.1);

-     We undertake effective engagement and are informed (D1.2).

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Rural lands are an integral part of the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area (LGA) that support a variety of agricultural and non-agricultural land use interests, including farming and rural industries, horticulture, rural living, tourism and protected environment. These interests are critical to the economic success of the rural economy and the region more broadly.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Draft Chapter 5 – Rural Lands includes a number of actions to achieve the Goals, Directions and Actions of the North Coast Regional Plan 2036 and to address issues associated with rural land use. Many of these actions are not funded; therefore, implementation of these actions is subject to funding through either Council’s Delivery Program or through grant applications or other initiatives.

Risk Analysis:

This report seeks endorsement from Council to publicly exhibit Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy and the Intensive Plant Agriculture Discussion Paper prior to Council’s proposed adoption of a final version of Chapter 5 – Rural Lands. This process provides an opportunity for stakeholder and community engagement and thus reduces Council’s risk.

Consultation:

A comprehensive community engagement framework has informed the rural lands review process to date. This consultation has been used as a key tool to identify rural land use related issues from the perspective of the community, landowners and key stakeholders.

Community consultation undertaken is as follows:

-     Workshop 1: Coramba, Woolgoolga and Bonville (1 - 3 March 2016);

-     Workshop 2: Coramba, Woolgoolga and Bonville (15 - 17 March 2016);

-     Exhibition of draft Issues and Options Paper and Background Report (20 July to 19 August 2016);

-     Establishment of Section 355 Agricultural Advisory Committee (July 2017);

-     Development of Rural Lands Policy Directions Paper (September 2017); and

-     Community and Stakeholder Workshops (October to November 2017) at the following locations:

§ Nana Glen;

§ Coramba;

§ Woolgoolga;

§ Coffs Harbour; and

§ Bonville.

The role of the Agricultural Advisory Committee has involved industry specific input into the development of Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy (Attachment 1) and the Intensive Plant Agriculture Discussion Paper (Attachment 2).

The formal public exhibition process will provide an opportunity for all rural land stakeholders and the broader community to comment on the proposed recommendations.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The objectives and desired outcomes of Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy is to assist in the delivery of the vision, aims and objectives of the North Coast Regional Plan 2036 and Council’s MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan 2017.

Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy is required to be endorsed by the NSW Department of Planning and Environment and will inform the preparation of Local Environmental Plans amendments and updates to Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan 2015.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Should Council adopt the preferred recommendation of this report, public exhibition of Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy and the Intensive Plant Agriculture Discussion Paper on will be undertaken for an extended period to 8 February 2019. There is no statutory minimum exhibition period for a Local Growth Management Strategy. An extended period of exhibition to 8 February 2019 is proposed due to the strategic significance of the document.

A further report will be put to Council to provide feedback on any submissions received during the public exhibition process and to seek endorsement of the final Chapter 5 – Rural Lands. Endorsement from the NSW Department of Planning and Environment would then be required prior to implementing any of the actions within Chapter 5 – Rural Lands.

Conclusion:

This report seeks Council’s endorsement of Chapter 5 – Rural Lands of the draft Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy (Attachment 1) and the Intensive Plant Agriculture Discussion Paper (Attachment 2) for public exhibition. It is important at this stage of the process that all the issues are conveyed and discussed with the community and stakeholders and thoroughly understood by Council prior to the proposed adoption of a final Chapter 5 – Rural Lands to sit within the updated Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy.

 


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SC18/46       Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Precinct - NSW Government Consultation Process Update

Author:                        Section Leader Local Planning

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      A.1 A vibrant and inclusive place

Attachments:              ATT1  SC18/46   'Coffs Opportunity' - GHD Community and Stakeholder Consultation Outcomes Report - October 2018  

 

Executive Summary

On 22 February 2018, Council endorsed a proposal by the NSW Government to undertake community and stakeholder engagement towards the development of a master plan for the Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Precinct. Consultation was undertaken by consultants over five months.

A Consultation Report has now been provided to the community outlining the findings and recommendations of the State government process to date and providing a Preliminary Concept Plan for the precinct (Attachment 1).

The purpose of this report is for Council to acknowledge the outcomes of the process, and to resolve to engage with the State government in the next stage of their process to develop a master plan for the precinct.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Acknowledge the outcomes of the NSW Government’s community engagement exercise outlined in the ‘Coffs Opportunity - GHD Community and Stakeholder Consultation Outcomes Report - October 2018 (Attachment 1).

2.       Continue to engage with the NSW Government in the next stage of their process to develop a master plan for the Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Precinct.

 

Report

Description of Item:

The Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Precinct contains several areas of land that are owned by the NSW Government. The NSW Government has developed a project which aims to develop a master plan for the precinct in consultation with the community and other key stakeholders, and then to consider how the government land is best repurposed and managed to achieve the master plan outcomes.

At its Ordinary Meeting of 22 February 2018, Council resolved:

That Council endorse and support the NSW Government community engagement exercise within the Jetty Foreshores Precinct (Attachment 1).

GHD was appointed by the NSW Government to conduct the consultation as an independent, open and transparent process with the community and key stakeholders. Consultation was undertaken over a five month period between February and June 2018. Findings of the consultation are outlined in the Consultation Outcomes Report (Attachment 1).

Once the consultation program had concluded, the community feedback was interpreted by consultants Group GSA into a Preliminary Concept Plan that visually illustrates the consultation outcomes. That plan is presented as Appendix A of Attachment 1, and provides a framework for the State government for future opportunities to revitalise the precinct.

Issues:

The NSW Government’s recommended next stage of the process is to determine the high-level viability and feasibility of the Preliminary Concept Plan and to develop funding options. This report recommends that Council seek to continue to engage with the State government in the next stage of their process to develop a master plan for the Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Precinct.

In terms of Council’s current and programmed initiatives within the jetty foreshores area, these will be advanced cognisant of the State Government master planning process for the precinct. Importantly, with the recent changes to the Crown Land Management Act 2016, Council is statutorily required to prepare an updated Plan of Management for the Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores. This plan of management will address issues such as the boat ramp, land tenure (eg former Deep Sea Fishing Club, Yacht Club, etc), public domain improvements (Jetty Foreshores Stage 6) and broader land management. The relationship between the statutorily required Plan of Management and the master plan for the Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Precinct will need to be clarified with the State Government.

Options:

1.   Accept the recommendations of this report to note the findings of the community engagement exercise for the Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Precinct and to engage in the future stage of development of a master plan for the precinct by the NSW Government.

2.   Reject the recommendations provided in this report.

This report recommends that Council undertake Option 1 as outlined.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Environmental factors, including coastal hazards, have been considered during the consultation process.

•     Social

The project to date has involved extensive community and stakeholder consultation to capture the community’s vision for the Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Precinct, in the form of a Preliminary Concept Plan.

•     Civic Leadership

The NSW Government’s Preliminary Concept Plan within Attachment 1 aims to capture the collective community vision for the precinct. This will allow them to consider how the government land in the precinct is best repurposed and managed to achieve the master plan outcomes.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The project objectives include the following economic outcomes: activation of the space, helping to grow new jobs for the region, and creating economically sustainable public domain and community assets.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The project is being undertaken by the NSW Government. As such, there are limited implications to the adopted Delivery Program and Operational Plan. Council staff have not been involved with conducting the consultation exercises.

Risk Analysis:

The NSW Government’s consultation was developed to be broad and transparent to reduce risks that segments of the community would not be consulted. An additional survey was added as a final step to the consultation process, which provided GHD with a high level of confidence that the broader community’s interests had been captured.

Consultation:

Consultation was undertaken by GHD on behalf of the State government in five steps over five months. A total of 562 people engaged with the online map; 143 people attended drop in sessions; 245 people responded to the first online survey; 90 people attended workshops; and 925 people responded to the final online survey. GHD have stated in their Consultation Outcomes Report that they are confident that community input has been broad and inclusive.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The NSW Government’s Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Plan of Management – June 2008 and North Coast Regional Plan 2036 are two key documents impacting this project. The project also accords with Council’s MyCoffs Community Strategy Plan 2017.

Implementation Date / Priority:

The Consultation Outcomes Report has developed a Preliminary Concept Plan for the precinct. The State government has advised its next steps are to determine the high-level viability and feasibility of the Preliminary Concept Plan and to develop funding options. That work will be undertaken by the NSW Government, with the ultimate aim to develop a master plan for the precinct.

Conclusion:

The Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Precinct contains several areas of land that are owned by the NSW Government. The NSW Government has developed a project which aims to develop a master plan for the Jetty Foreshores Precinct in consultation with the community and other key stakeholders, and then to consider how the government land is best repurposed and managed to achieve the master plan outcomes.

This report provides an update to Council on the consultation undertaken by consultants on behalf of the State government during 2018. The purpose of this report is for Council to acknowledge the outcomes of the process, and to resolve to engage with the State government in the next stage of their process to develop a master plan for the precinct.

 


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SC18/47       Coffs Future Transport Strategy - Project Scope

Author:                        Urban Engineer

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      B.1 A thriving and sustainable local economy

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

Council is currently preparing a Coffs Future Transport Strategy, which will follow the ‘best practice’ approach of integrating with land use planning and adopting contemporary approaches to planning and designing our road and street networks.  The Strategy is being prepared in partnership with Transport for NSW to align with regional strategies and to coordinate with State Government funding programs.

The purpose of this report is to inform Council of the project scope for the preparation of a transport strategy that aligns with Transport for NSW’s preferred approach and is based on contemporary national guidelines for integrated transport and land use planning.

 

Recommendation:

That Council note the project scope detailed within this report for the preparation of the Coffs Future Transport Strategy.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Background

Council commenced the preparation of a Future Transport Strategy for Coffs Harbour in July 2018. This Strategy will provide a broad strategic position on a variety of transport issues for the Coffs Harbour regional city, and build upon the MyCoffs Community Vision of a 'connected, sustainable and thriving' regional city.

Major themes to be considered as part of the development of the Strategy include:

-     population and employment growth areas;

-     alignment of transport corridors;

-     moving towards increased walking and cycling possibilities;

-     future capacity of the existing transport network;

-     new technologies and trends in transport;

-     streets that are made for people and not just cars; and

-     parking strategies.

Development of the Strategy comes at an opportune time in regard to:

-     running in tandem with the update of Council’s Local Growth Management Strategy (LGMS), enabling a feedback loop between the two strategies;

-     targeting opportunities to ensure Coffs Harbour benefits from the Pacific Highway bypass project;

-     managing and benefiting from rapidly unfolding trends and technologies such as the Coffs Connected and Autonomous Vehicle trial; and

-     partnering with Transport for NSW and aligning with their Future Transport 2056 strategy.

Coffs Future Transport Strategy will follow a ‘best practice’ approach of integrating with land use planning. This recognises that strategic city-shaping transport initiatives can change a city’s development patterns and growth trajectory, which can change the decisions people and businesses make about where to locate.

By shaping the pattern of development and influencing the location, scale, density, design, and mix of land uses, planning can help facilitate an efficient transport and land use system by:

-     reducing car reliance by reducing the need to travel and the length of journeys;

-     making it safer and easier for people to access services;

-     reducing the impact of transport on communities and enhancing the ‘Place’ function of our streets;

-     providing for efficient distribution of goods and services to business and community;

-     providing a choice of travel modes – walking, cycling, public transport, car-sharing, etc.; and

-     ensuring flexibility to meet the demands of a changing economy and emerging technologies and trends.

Project Scope

The Strategy will apply to the Coffs Harbour LGA with a focused approach on key centres.

The project will be undertaken in six linked stages as shown schematically in Figure 1. The process aligns with Transport for NSW’s preferred approach which is largely based on Australian Transport Assessment and Planning Guidelines for Integrated Transport and Land Use Planning.

Transport for NSW have agreed to provide in-kind support throughout the process in the form of:

-     facilitating workshops together with Council and key stakeholders such as Roads and Maritime Services, Department of Premier and Cabinet, Department of Planning and Environment, Transport for NSW, NSW Train Link and local bus companies;

-     coordinating input and liaising with key State Government bodies; and

-     assisting with coordinating priority actions with State Government funding programs.

Various consultancies will assist with each stage. The consultancies will be selected based on the focus of each stage and based on specialised components such as PlaceScore; development of walking and cycling network plans; refinement of design guides; traffic modelling; and costing analysis of key initiatives.

 


Figure 1: Coffs Future Transport Strategy – Project Scope

Issues:

·    Transport for NSW’s Movement and Place Framework

The Coffs Future Transport Strategy is designed to align with Transport for NSW’s preferred approach of activating centres with a Movement and Place framework (refer Figure 2). The Movement and Place framework recognises the dual function of streets as ‘movement corridors’ (for moving people and things) and ‘places’ (for leisure, recreation, and exchange).

Streets make up 80% of the accessible open space in our towns and cities. This framework focuses on delivering streets that correctly balance the movement and place functions. Using this approach, streets prioritise place value while only accommodating traffic movement if and where appropriate, whereas roads prioritise the movement of traffic over longer distances and at higher speeds. This approach was adopted in the Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan.

Figure 2: Movement and Place Framework

·    Project Objectives – Connecting Places

The Coffs Future Transport Strategy will reinforce a place-making approach to planning, by connecting our ‘places’, and guiding future road upgrades and reallocation of road space for safety, business activity, comfort, walking, cycling, movement and parking. It will provide a prioritised action plan to deliver initiatives over the short to medium term.

The Strategy will not be a business-as-usual approach to managing growth and responding to demand. Trends and technologies such as driverless vehicles, electric bikes and vehicles, ride-sharing and app development, have the potential to significantly change the community’s behaviour with transport. The strategy will address how we manage these trends to ensure they work best for us in achieving the Coffs Harbour we want. 

The Strategy will include measurable targets aimed at key initiatives including walking and riding to school and work, public transport, accessible parking and movement and place principles. At the end of the process, the Strategy will deliver a suite of prioritised actions that have been tested and costed to ensure delivery of affordable outcomes.

·    Case Study

Transport for NSW is proposing to use Coffs Harbour as a case study for a NSW Government Movement and Place Steering Committee chaired by Government Architect NSW. The steering committee consists of Infrastructure NSW, Treasury, Premier and Cabinet, Transport Cluster (including RMS), and the NSW Department of Planning and Environment. This will provide Coffs Harbour with the opportunity to pilot new initiatives and interventions such as the Connected and Autonomous Vehicle trial. Transport for NSW has also has identified Coffs Harbour as an area for a bus network review in 2019.

·    Memorandum of Understanding

The desired strategic direction for transport in Coffs Harbour may differ in some instances from the path desired by Transport for NSW. However, the potential for this is not considered significant and the benefits of partnering with Transport for NSW outweigh this risk. Nevertheless, a Memorandum of Understanding is proposed to be drafted and agreed with Transport for NSW to mitigate this risk.

Options:

Council has two options available to progress this matter:

1.   Adopt the recommendations of this report and note the proposed project scope.

Comment: This option is recommended as it will ensure that the Future Transport Strategy is aligned with Transport for NSW’s preferred approach which follows the Australian Transport Assessment and Planning Guidelines and which is likely to provide the best opportunity for matching priority actions with State Government funding streams.

2.   Resolve to amend the scope of the project.

Comment: This option is not recommended as it may deviate the course of the project away from a best-practice approach and reduce opportunities for funding of actions.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

A shift from car reliance to ‘active transport’ such as walking and cycling will be an objective of the project with strategies that include land use planning such as promoting a ‘compact city’ form, and enhancing our walking and cycling path networks.

•     Social

The transport strategy will address equitable provision of mobility including improvements to our public transport systems and policies for provision of accessible parking and associated movement networks. The Strategy will address the whole Coffs Harbour LGA.

•     Civic Leadership

The Strategy will provide a clear and prioritised direction of how Council intends to achieve the MyCoffs vision of 'connected, sustainable and thriving' through transport related initiatives. It will broadly address a large range of MyCoffs objectives plus specific transport-related outcomes including:

-     We support our community to lead healthy active lives - (A2.1)

Outcomes include: active transport is encouraged through an integrated network of cycleways and footpaths that connect our key spaces.

-     We attract people to work, live and visit in the Coffs Harbour local government area - (B1.2)

Outcomes include: our urban and business centres offer the amenity, connectivity and lifestyle and liveability options that encourage businesses and professionals to relocate to our area.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The Coffs Future Transport Strategy will provide a prioritised delivery program aligned with State Government funding streams and will be developed with consideration of realistic budget limitations. The project will include a costing analysis to assist in development and refinement of strategies and a funding program.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The project is captured within Council’s current Delivery Program and Operational Plan. It will be led by staff, however various consultancies will assist with each stage. Consultancies will be selected based on the focus of each stage.

The project will be managed with a two-year (adopted) budget of $400,000 and is being financed with the following allocated funds:

-     $150,000 for 2018/2019 financial year

-     $250,000 for 2019/2020 financial year

It is noted that Tweed Shire Council and Port Macquarie-Hastings Council are also preparing integrated transport strategies with similar budgets of $400,000.

Risk Analysis:

The Strategy will be developed with an internal working group, and in collaboration with Transport for NSW. It will include a staged approach with community consultation, stakeholder engagement and Council review. This will assist in mitigating potential risks.

Consultation:

Community consultation will be undertaken with the wider community, key stakeholders and user groups at various stages of the project, including:

-     a PlaceScore assessment to capture community values across the LGA;

-     Have Your Say on the Vision document;

-     a community consultation process near the completion of Stage 3 to invite feedback on the Goals, Objectives and Measurable Targets and the broad Place and Movement Network.

Councillors will also be engaged with the process at key stages.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

There are no statutory requirements in relation to preparing a transport strategy. The Strategy will integrate with relevant regional planning strategies, action plans and Council planning strategies. The Strategy will also be developed in partnership with Transport for NSW with consideration of state government transport related strategies. The project adopts an approach based on Australian Transport Assessment and Planning Guidelines for Integrated Transport and Land Use Planning.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Council commenced the preparation of the Coffs Future Transport Strategy in July 2018. Development of the Strategy is a designated high priority, and is funded in Council’s adopted Delivery Program and Operational Plan. Work to date has largely involved liaison with Transport for NSW and scope development. Completion of the project is anticipated by June 2020.

Conclusion:

The scope of the Coffs Future Transport Strategy has been developed in partnership with Transport for NSW using a ‘best practice’ approach for integrated transport and land use planning. The scope enables delivery of a progressive transport strategy aligned with the MyCoffs vision and land use strategies. The partnership with Transport for NSW will also assist with coordinating priority strategy actions with State Government funding programs.

 


SC18/48       Sustainability Advisory Committee

Author:                        Section Leader Community Planning & Performance

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      C.2 A natural environment sustained for the future

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

At its meeting of 10 May 2018, Council considered a Notice of Motion and resolved to establish a Sustainability Advisory Committee.

Extensive research and analysis has been undertaken, which draws on case studies from other councils, Council’s existing sustainability policy, as well as staff feedback, to consider the options for establishing a viable and effective committee.

Sustainability is a priority issue for Council.  This is reinforced by the suite of adopted plans and strategies that address sustainability matters together with the existence a number of s355 advisory committees that Council has in operation which already deal with principles of sustainability consistent with Council’s Sustainability Policy.  Accordingly, given the breadth of focus of ‘sustainability’ as a topic, it appears challenging to establish a singular Sustainability Advisory Committee, particularly in the absence of a defined goal that is not already being addressed by Council.

 

Recommendation:

That Council notes the report.

 

Report

Description of Item:

At its meeting of 10 May 2018, Council considered a Notice of Motion with regards to a Sustainability Advisory Committee.  At this meeting, it was resolved:

That Council establish a Sustainability Advisory Committee.

Extensive research and analysis has been undertaken, which draws on case studies from other councils, Council’s existing sustainability policy as well as staff feedback, to consider the options for establishing a viable and effective committee.

Issues:

Scope of Committee

Sustainability is a priority issue for Council and recognised by the organisation as being relevant to all work areas, and this is clearly articulated by Council’s adopted Sustainability Policy.

In this regard, Council’s adopted Sustainability Policy outlines Council’s commitment to progressing towards sustainability and to the principles of sustainability under which Council conducts its activities.

The policy sets out that Council will focus its sustainability efforts in the following key areas, based on the ten principles of One Planet Living:

-     Zero Carbon - Ensure buildings and activities are energy efficient and deliver all energy with renewable technologies.

-     Reduce Waste - Reduce waste by avoidance, reuse and recycling, maximising diversion of waste from landfill.

-     Sustainable Transport - Reduce the need to travel, and encouraging low and zero carbon modes of transport to reduce emissions.

-     Local and Sustainable Materials - Use sustainable and healthy products, such as those with low embodied energy, locally sourced, and made from renewable or recycled resources.

-     Local and Sustainable Food - Support sustainable and humane farming, promoting access to healthy, low impact, local, seasonal and organic diets and reducing food waste.

-     Sustainable Water - Use water efficiently in all buildings and operations. Designing to avoid local issues such as flooding, drought and water course pollution.

-     Land Use and Biodiversity - Protect and restore biodiversity and natural habitats through appropriate land use management and planning.

-     Culture and Community - Respect and revive local identity, wisdom and culture; encouraging the involvement of people in shaping their community and creating a new culture of sustainability.

-     Equity and Local Economy - Create bioregional economies that support equity and diverse local employment and international fair trade.

-     Health and Happiness - Encourage active, sociable and meaningful lives to promote good health and wellbeing.

Council aims to implement the policy by:

-     Applying the principles and focus areas outlined in this policy to its decision-making frameworks and operational activities

-     Ensuring all staff understand their role in applying sustainability to their daily work.

-     Showing leadership to the community as a good corporate citizen by continually improving its sustainability performance.

-     Setting its own sustainability targets and regularly monitoring and reporting on this sustainability performance to the community.

-     Supporting the efforts of the wider community in the transition to a low carbon community by fostering greater awareness of sustainability issues.

-     Recognising that investing in sustainability initiatives provides long-term social, economic and environmental outcomes/ benefits.

Given that sustainability is such an incredibly broad topic, consideration needs to be given to the scope of a Sustainability Advisory Committee.

Policy Development / Implementation

It is acknowledged that committees often work best where there is a clear and defined purpose.

In this regard, advisory committees have often been at their most effective when they are focussed on strategic and policy development more than operational input. There is great value in having community expertise during policy development as they can help develop policy options and contribute to community engagement by leveraging their community networks. There is a risk any advisory committee members may become frustrated by their involvement in a new Sustainability Advisory Committee given that many Council plans and strategies have only recently been developed and adopted, and their implementation is already scoped and commenced, leaving limited room for reconsideration or variation.

Existing Committees / Duplication

There are a number of existing s355 advisory committees that Council has in operation which already deal with some principles of sustainability consistent with Council’s Sustainability Policy. These include the Koala Plan of Management Committee, the Coastal and Estuary Management Committee, and the Multicultural Advisory Committee and the Yandaarra Aboriginal Advisory Committee. In addition, there is an internal working group that is overseeing the implementation of the Renewable Energy Emissions Reduction Plan. There is potential that a separate Sustainability Advisory Committee may duplicate the role or work undertaken by these other committees.

Given that additional resources would be required, or resources diverted from existing services, there needs to be consideration given to what the Committee’s mandate is and the rationale for the formation of such an advisory committee, and whether Council is already doing enough in terms of engaging the community on sustainability issues without such a committee.

Examples of other Council Sustainability Committees

There are examples where other Local Government Areas (LGA) have developed sustainability advisory committees or similar.

Although each LGA has its own uniqueness, staff have explored examples of committees as listed in the table below. Some Councils have separated biodiversity and climate issues from sustainability, while some have considered sustainability in its broadest context. Chosen representation on these committees is also varied.

Byron Bay

Sustainability and Emissions Reduction Advisory Committee

Aim:

1.     To assist Council in the development, implementation and review of relevant sustainability and emissions reduction plans, policies and projects.

2.     To support our community’s drive towards zero emissions.

3.     To identify and report opportunities or concerns regarding sustainability and emission reduction issues to Council including, but not limited to, funding opportunities, special events, government policy, practice or guidelines.

Membership:

3 x Councillors

4 x relevantly qualified community representatives

1 x Zero Emissions Byron (ZEB) representatives

1 x Community-Owned Renewable Energy Mullumbimby (COREM) representative

General Manager (or staff member delegate).

Biodiversity Advisory Committee

Aim:

1.     To assist Council in the development, implementation and review of relevant biodiversity plans and policies.

2.     To identify and report opportunities or concerns regarding biodiversity issues to Council.

Membership:

3 x Councillors

3 x relevantly qualified community representatives

1 x Brunswick Valley Landcare representative

General Manager (or staff member delegate)

Albury

Sustainability Advisory Committee

Aim:

Developed to implement their Albury 2030 Plan

Membership:

2 x Councillors

6 x Community members

Biodiversity considered as part of the Sustainability Committee

Lane Cove

Sustainability Advisory Committee

Aim:

The Sustainability Advisory Committee's function is to assist Council in the formulation, prioritisation and implementation of strategies and initiatives to achieve sustainability as primarily set out in the Sustainability Action Plan

Membership:

5 x residents from public nominations;

1 x youth representative nominated by the Lane Cove Youth Advisory Committee;

1 x business representative nominated by the Lane Cove Chamber of Commerce;

1 x representative nominated by the Lane Cove Bushland Management Advisory Committee;

3 x Councillors; and

1 x member of staff

Bushland Management Advisory Committee

Aim:

Provides advice on bushland management.

Membership:

3X Councillors, a representative from a local Bushcare Group, the Manager - Bushland, members of the Community (including a wildlife representative) and Representatives of the Lane Cove Bushland and Conservation Society.

Waverley

Sustainability Advisory Committee

Aim:

Assist Council in translating its strategic vision as outlined in Waverley Together 3 and Council’s Environmental Action Plan (EAP) in an efficient and effective manner.

Membership:

4 x Councillors, one of whom is the Mayor

6 x Local Sustainability Practitioners

Biodiversity considered as part of the Sustainability Committee

Nillumbik Council

Sustainability Advisory Committee

Aim:

Raising environmental issues of interest and concern for Nillumbik for information to, and consideration by, Council on all aspects of the environment.

Check the progress of the Green Wedge Management Plan implementation including environmental, economic and social impacts.

Membership:

2 x Councillors

8 x Community representatives

Biodiversity considered as part of the Sustainability Committee

Options:

1.   That Council notes the report and does not establish a Sustainability Advisory Committee.

2.   That Council rejects the recommendation and directs staff to establish a Sustainability Advisory Committee. In this option, it is requested that Council provides clear and detailed direction with regards to:

2.1. The mandate and/or purpose of the advisory committee

2.2. The scope of the advisory committee (which principles of the Sustainability Policy the committee is to address)

2.3. Membership of the advisory committee

2.4. Where resources to support coordination of the advisory committee are to be diverted from.

3.   That Council rejects the recommendation and amends the terms of reference of an established committee to clearly define the sustainability purpose and scope.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental issues impacted by the recommendation in this report.

•     Social

There are no social issues impacted by the recommendation in this report.

•     Civic Leadership

Council displays civic leadership in regards to sustainability matters through the adopted policies, plans and strategies, and the existing advisory committees, as mentioned previously in this report. 

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

There are no broad economic implications associated with the recommendations in this report.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Coordination of a sustainability advisory committee is not identified in Council’s Delivery Program or Operational Plan and as such is not resourced.

It is anticipated that creation of a s355 advisory committee would require additional resources to support coordination of the committee, issue management, and recruitment and selection of membership. Based on an existing Council advisory committee that meets every 2 months, the resourcing implications are estimated at $10,000.

This may need to be supplemented by the participation of staff subject matter experts should the committee involve topics within their expertise. This also does not include scoping and/or resourcing of any initiatives proposed by the committee where it is not within existing work plans. There is also the opportunity cost involved i.e. the initiatives that the staff involved cannot undertake on due to commitments regarding participation in the committee.

Risk Analysis:

There is a risk that advisory committee members may become frustrated and become disengaged if they are members of an advisory committee without a clear mandate and that has limited scope to impact existing endorsed strategic direction set with regards to sustainability matters.

Consultation:

In considering this report, a number of internal stakeholders were consulted to discuss the options and feedback. ’Sustainability’ is not located in one area of the organisation and there are a number of different sections and staff within Council who are accountable to the community for different aspects of sustainability, even more so if considering sustainability from a QBL perspective.

Stakeholders were asked to consider the viability of their involvement in a new Sustainability Advisory Committee. Consistent feedback and advice given included:

-     In order to create an effectively functioning and empowered committee that an operational budget be made available for implementing the ideas and recommendations of an advisory committee.

-     Clear purpose or function of the committee needs to be defined so there is a clear mandate or very clear tasks which the committee are focused upon achieving.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

-     Sustainability Policy

-     Renewable Energy Emissions Reduction Plan (REERP)

-     Biodiversity Action Strategy

-     Flying Fox Management Plan

-     Koala Management Plan

-     Coffs Coast Waste Services Strategy

-     Resourcing Strategy (especially the Long Term Financial Plan, Asset Management Strategy)

Implementation Date / Priority:

As this Report does not recommend confirming a sustainability committee there are no relevant implementation dates.

Conclusion:

Sustainability is a priority issue for Council and our community. To truly deal with sustainability, we arguably require broad community and governmental participation and action, sharing responsibility for addressing sustainability principles across the community.

  


SI18/25         Traffic Committee Meeting Nos. 6/2018 & 7/2018

Author:                        Senior Engineering Officer - Traffic

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

MyCoffs:                      D.2 We have effective use of public resources.

Attachments:              ATT1  SI18/25    TCM Minutes - 24 October 2018

ATT2  SI18/25    TCM Minutes - 21 November 2018  

 

Executive Summary

The Local Traffic Committee (LTC) Meeting minutes are presented to Council for information. There were two electronic meetings considered nine items, seven were regulatory in nature, and two were events. Two of the regulatory items were deferred pending further investigation. All recommendations were of a minor nature and were therefore approved under the delegated authority issued by Council. The report lists the minutes for Council to note.

 

Recommendation:

That Council note the Minutes of the Local Traffic Committee Meeting of 24 October 2018 and 21 November 2018, and that the actions contained in the minutes have been authorised in accordance with the delegations issued by Council.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Council’s delegation under the Roads Act 1993 requires Council to seek the advice of the NSW Police and the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) before exercising their delegated functions. This requirement is satisfied by Council’s utilisation of the Local Traffic Committee.

In cases where the Local Traffic Committee advice is unanimous (as it was for all items covered in this report), and Council intends to follow that advice (which in this case it does), Council may authorise the implementation of the facility or device without further notifying the RMS or the NSW Police.

Issues:

Council should note carefully the recommendations of the LTC as they relate to the authorisation of traffic control facilities and prescribed traffic control devices with the aim to improve road safety and traffic management on local roads.

Options:

If the Council wishes to act contrary to unanimous LTC advice, then Council must notify in writing, both the NSW Police and the RMS representatives on the LTC.  Council must then refrain from taking any action for 14 days so that the NSW Police or the RMS is given an opportunity to appeal to the Chairperson, Regional Traffic Committee should they wish.

In the case of an appeal, the decision of the Chairperson, Regional Traffic Committee is binding and final for matters under the Road Transport (Safety and Traffic Management) Act 1999.

Council does not need to notify the NSW Police or the RMS if they decide not to proceed with any proposal for any reason.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Not applicable.

•     Social

The recommendations in the report serve to improve road safety and traffic flow in the Local Government Area.

•     Civic Leadership

Council is responsible for the safe and efficient operation of the local traffic facilities, recommended by the LTC.

Safe and efficient traffic facilities are in line with several objectives of the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan including:

-     A.2 An Active, Safe and Healthy Community

-     C.1 Liveable neighbourhoods with a defined identity

-     D.2 We have effective use of public resources

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Not applicable.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Council has an existing budget for minor works associated with traffic improvements.

Risk Analysis:

The risk assessment has identified the following risks associated with the Local Traffic Committee recommendations:

·     That Council may fail to fulfil its delegations as a road manager

·     That Council may fail to implement risk mitigation measures identified in the Local Traffic Committee meeting

To mitigate these risks, it is recommended that Council:

·     Implement the LTC recommendations as detailed in this report.

Consultation:

The Local Traffic Committee members’ attendance is listed on the minutes.  Most of the matters raised were requests from the community.  Relevant stakeholders were consulted and reports were submitted to the Local Traffic Committee meeting.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Traffic control facilities and prescribed traffic control devices may be authorised for use on a road or road related area, whether a public road or on private land, only by the RMS or Council.

Traffic may be regulated for various purposes by means of notices or barriers erected by a road authority.

Section 50 of the Transport Administration Act 1988 permits RMS to delegate its functions to other public agencies such as Councils.

Section 53A Part 6 permits RMS to give directions to Councils in relation to RMS functions.

The Road Transport (Safety and Traffic Management) Act 1999, incorporating the Road Rules 2008 provides for a system of traffic laws relating to all vehicles and pedestrians.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Road related modifications will be listed in the works program for installation within two months of the Council meeting.

Conclusion:

Council to note Minutes of the electronic Traffic Committee Meeting No. 6/2018 and 7/2018, and to note that LTC Items T.52 and T.53 were deferred pending further investigation and T.50, T.51, T.54, T.55, T.56, T.57 and T.58 have been approved by the Director of Sustainable Infrastructure.

 


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SI18/26         Amendment to Alcohol Free Areas in Woolgoolga CBD for Eat Street Events

Author:                        Works Program Co-ordinator

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

MyCoffs:                      B.1 A thriving and sustainable local economy

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

Following successful “Eat Street” events in Market Street, Woolgoolga in both 2017 and 2018, the organisers wish to hold four similar events during the course of 2019, including as part of the 2019 Curryfest. The proposed dates are:

1.       Saturday 12 January 2019 from 3pm – 11pm

2.       Saturday 13 April 2019 from 3pm – 11pm

3.       Saturday 13 July 2019 from 3pm – 11pm

4.       Saturday 5 October 2019 from 3pm – 11pm

The event involves a number of mobile vendors in Market Street complementing the permanent dining venues showcasing craft beer, cider and wine products. Stall holders will be permitted to sell alcohol to patrons within the fenced event area.

Market Street is currently an Alcohol Free Zone (AFZ). Section 645 of the Local Government (LG) Act provides for Council, by resolution, to allow the temporary suspension of AFZs for specific periods or events.  The LG Act and Ministerial Guidelines on Alcohol Free Zones (February 2009) provide a specific procedure which must be followed in relation to suspending AFZs, and this includes a requirement to seek Council’s endorsement as well as Police approval.

 

Recommendation:

That Council, in accordance with s645 Local Government Act 1993, approve the temporary suspension of the Market Street, Woolgoolga Alcohol Free Zone between Nightingale Street and Queen Street, on:

1.       Saturday 12 January 2019 from 3pm – 11pm

2.       Saturday 13 April 2019 from 3pm – 11pm

3.       Saturday 13 July 2019 from 3pm – 11pm

4.       Saturday 5 October 2019 from 3pm – 11pm

 

Report

Description of Item:

Temporary Suspension of Alcohol Free Zones

The “Eat Street” event was first held in September 2017 as an extension of the annual Curryfest event celebrating Woolgoolga’s unique Punjabi heritage. The event was a success, and three “Eat Street” events were subsequently held in 2018. The organisers propose to hold four more similar “Eat Street” events in Market Street, Woolgoolga, during the course of 2019.

The event is expected to have approximately 15 mobile food vendors, complementing the permanent dining venues operating in Market Street, as well as 6-8 vendors showcasing their craft beer, cider and wine products. These stallholders will be permitted to sell alcohol to patrons within the fenced event area pending suspension of the existing Alcohol Free Zone in Market Street between the hours of 3pm and 10pm. The vendors will then have until 11pm to remove their product from the street.

Section 645 of the Local Government (LG) Act provides for Council, by resolution, to allow the temporary suspension of AFZs for specific periods or events.  The LG Act and Ministerial Guidelines on Alcohol Free Zones (February 2009) provide a specific procedure which must be followed in relation to suspending AFZs, and this includes a requirement to seek Council’s endorsement as well as obtaining Police approval.

Issues:

Alcohol Free Zone Suspension

The organisers have applied for Police and Traffic Management approvals for the 2019 events. There are no issues perceived with the temporary suspensions as they are for specific managed events in well frequented areas. AFZ suspensions such as these allow Council and the business community flexibility to stage events and festivals as part of a broader activation strategy.

Options:

1.       Adopt the recommendations: there is no history of incidents associated with this event

2.       Modify the recommendation to limit the suspension – for example to reduce the number of hours. However, Council has received no complaints about previous events so this would seem unnecessary.

3.       Reject the recommendation; however, failure to allow flexibility within the Woolgoolga CBD for managed activation events, such as “Eat Street” may impact negatively on the CBD businesses and local tourism outcomes.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

No negative environmental concerns will occur as a result of the amended alcohol controls.

•     Social

There are minimal social concerns associated with amending the Market Street alcohol free zone to allow “Eat Street” events to take place.  Police will be monitoring the events and have the powers to deal with any anti-social behaviour that may take place under the existing legislation. The organisers have completed a risk assessment; they have applied for Police approval and will employ Security personnel. They also employ Responsible Service of Alcohol marshals to patrol the event.

•     Civic Leadership

This proposal works towards achieving the outcomes identified within the Coffs Harbour 2030 Strategic Plan and addresses the following objectives:

-     A thriving and sustainable local economy

-     A community achieving its potential

-     A vibrant and inclusive place.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Temporarily suspending the AFZ for specific events and establishing regular hospitality events provides an economic benefit for the region. The event encourages more tourists to stay in Woolgoolga, and provides entertainment for locals.

•      Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The cost of installing notices will be absorbed within current programs.

Risk Analysis

Temporary suspension of AFZ’s

The event organiser has completed a risk assessment and proposed a range of measures to mitigate risks. There will be Security guards on patrol at entry/exit points and patrolling the event area. RSA marshals will proactively patrol the area to ensure responsible service and conduct of alcohol.

Consultation:

Internal consultation has been completed.  Externally, the event organisers will liaise with the Coffs Clarence Police Local Area Command, Ambulance and local businesses.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Alcohol Free Zones

Section 645 of the Local Government Act provides for Council, by resolution, to allow the temporary suspension of any AFZ. The Act and Ministerial Guidelines on Alcohol-Free Zones (February 2009) provide a specific procedure which must be followed in relation to suspending AFZs, and this includes a requirement to seek Council’s endorsement. 

Following adoption of the suspension of an AFZ, Council must publish a notice in a local newspaper informing the community of the suspension that will be in place: AFZ street signs must be covered immediately on commencement of the timeframe and the covers removed immediately at the end of the suspension period. The Event Organiser will be responsible for ensuring the correct signs are in place.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Notices will be installed following the Council resolution at least one week before each event. The resolution will come into effect once notices are installed.

Conclusion:

It is recommended, for Councillors’ consideration, that allowing a temporary suspension of the AFZ in Market Street Woolgoolga for regular “Eat Street” events will allow for enhanced opportunities for local businesses and subsequent promotion of the town.

 


SI18/27         Draft Vehicles on Beaches Policy

Author:                        Building & Open Spaces Strategist

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

MyCoffs:                      A.2 An active, safe and healthy community

Attachments:              ATT1  SI18/27    Stakeholder Consultation

ATT2  SI18/27    Draft Driving on Beaches Policy  

 

Executive Summary

In early 2017 Council engaged with the MIDROC member councils, Mid Coast Council, and other key stakeholders on the management of vehicles on beaches. This resulted in a report to the February 2017 Ordinary Council meeting. Consequent to that meeting, a revised Draft Vehicles on Beaches policy is now presented with adjustments to permissible 4wheel drive areas.

The adjustments to permissible areas included in the revised Policy have been made in response to stakeholder engagement, assessed conflicting/incompatible uses and environmental sensitivity.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Approve the public exhibition of the draft Vehicles on Beaches Policy for a period of 28 days from mid-January to mid-February;

2.       Note that a report will be returned to Council detailing the outcome of the public exhibition;

3.       Temporarily restrict access to Arrawarra Beach from Arrawarra Headland to the Arrawarra Creek entrance and north of the access point at Corindi from 21 December (start of school holidays) until 1 March 2019.

4.       Communicate new restrictions through targeted engagement and installation of signage.

 

Report

Background

Coffs Harbour City Council currently allows vehicular access to the following beaches, under the provisions of the now outdated 1996 Vehicles on Beaches Policy:

·        Boambee Beach

·        Hearnes Lake Beach

·        Woolgoolga Back Beach

·        Darkum Beach (beach currently inaccessible)

·        Arrawarra Beach

·        Pipeclay Beach

·        North Beach

·        Station Creek Beach

There is also vehicle access to boat ramps or beach launching areas at various locations.

Professional fishermen are able to access additional locations in accord with Fisheries Management Act 1994 and the Solitary Islands Marine Park zoning provisions.

Council has now prepared a draft Policy, which includes some of the recommendations from the MIDROC working groups as well as some minor changes to vehicle access.

Draft Policy:

Key aspects of the Policy are:

1.       Adjustments to beaches that vehicles are currently permitted on are as follows:

o   North Beach – part of Bongil Bongil National park. Now included within Council’s Policy. Users already require a NPWS Parks Pass to access this beach with associated compliance with National Parks regulations.

o   Boambee Beach – reduce area to exclude small area at the mouth of the Boambee Creek estuary.

o   Hearnes Lake Beach – removed due to environmental sensitivity. North of Hearnes Lake Road to Wills Creek comprises a nesting area for the endangered little terns and also has NPWS records of sea turtles nesting (Green and Loggerhead turtles). Along with the dogs off leash usage, future approved development adjacent to this beach will also lead to an increase in recreational use. The adopted Hearnes Lake Estuary Management Plan recommends that the current vehicle access point is closed due to the need to cross the Lake entrance channel to gain access to the beach. It is considered that these uses/values are incompatible with continued vehicle access.

o   Darkum Beach – deleted due to limited vehicle accessibility. Assessment indicates that due to the topographic constraints no sustainable practical access can be achieved.

o   Woolgoolga Back Beach – The allowable area has been limited to north of the access point to keep vehicles away from the Creek entrance. This is in response to the Willis Creek Estuary Coastal Zone Management Plan which notes that the Willis Creek entrance may move to the north as a result of coastal processes responding to sea level rise and other climate change impacts. This may be reviewed in the future as these processes impact further on the existing car park, 4WD access to the beach and associated infrastructure.

o   Arrawarra Beach – Arrawarra Headland to Arrawarra Creek entrance deleted to reflect Solitary Island Marine Park (SIMP) provisions and competing uses. Current SIMP maps indicate that Arrawarra Beach is vehicle prohibited, other than for the launching and retrieving boats. It is considered that the high number of recreational users, boat launching, and associated parking of vehicles and trailers make this location unsuitable for continued recreational 4WD use. The recommendation is to align with the SIMP prohibition in this instance.

o   Corindi/Pipeclay – modified to exclude the area north of the existing vehicle access point off MacDougall Street due to increased risk of conflict between recreational beach users on foot and vehicles.

It is proposed that these restrictions for Arrawarra and Corindi are put in place from the start of the school holidays (21 December 2018) to the end of summer (1 March 2019) due to increased safety risks. If this position is resolved by Council, it will be communicated to the community through targeted engagement, social media and temporary signage.

o   Station Creek Beach – Access through Yuraygir National Park is now included within Council’s draft Policy. Users already require a NPWS Parks Pass to access this beach with associated compliance with National Parks regulations.

2.       The following groups are exempt from the Policy:

o   Emergency Services personnel during bona fide rescues, patrols or “exercises” authorised by Coffs Harbour City Council;

o   Authorised servants of Local, State and Commonwealth Governments in performance of their duties.

3.       Parking on the beach after launching boats will no longer be permitted on vehicle prohibited beaches.

Stakeholder engagement has been undertaken (summary attached) and a draft Policy prepared. Wherever practicable, comments from stakeholders have been integrated within the Policy excluding a permit system.

Issues:

Beaches are highly valued by both the local community of Coffs Harbour and the many visitors to our region.  They are a significant driver of tourism for the region and support a diverse range of recreational activities.  Beaches are integral to the lifestyle of Coffs Harbour and contribute to the overall amenity and visual appeal of our City.  Beaches and their associated dunal systems are vital ecological resources, providing habitat to a variety of native flora and fauna as well as protecting terrestrial areas from coastal erosion processes.

There have been long held concerns by many members of the community in regards to the environmental impacts of 4WDs on beaches from damage to dunal vegetation, impacts on macrobenthic organisms from sand compaction, impacts on little tern colonies and turtles, impacts on shore birds, as well as safety concerns for other beach users.  This has resulted in requests to review the beaches where vehicle access is permitted to reduce the potential for environmental damage.

Driving on beaches is a popular recreational pastime enjoyed by both residents and visitors to the region. Driving on beaches is also important for recreational fishing.  The draft Policy represents a balanced approach to allowing the 4WD and fishing community to enjoy these natural assets whilst protecting the safety of other beach users and the sensitive and dynamic beach environment.

These are detailed below:

Benefits of the Policy

1.       Safety/Risk mitigation. Projected population increase along the coastal strip will place increased pressures on our beaches, with higher levels of competing usage and more potential for conflict between users. This is of particular concern in locations of high beach activity. The proposed changes to permitted beaches would increase the safety and amenity of beaches for non-motorised activities.

2.       Protection of environmental values. Beach environments are sensitive and dynamic.  Beaches and their associated dunal systems are vital ecological resources, providing habitat to a variety of native flora and fauna as well as protecting terrestrial areas from coastal erosion processes.  Council has a legislative and custodial responsibility to make sure that both beach users and the environment are protected.  This includes the protection of shore bird habitats and the ecological and physical integrity of the sensitive dunal environment. Improper use can compromise these values and reduce Beaches and dunes as habitat and places of aesthetic appeal and human escape.

Damage to dunal areas is of particular concern at Boambee Beach.  Disturbance to “Little Terns’, an endangered species, and turtles, has been identified as concerning at Hearnes Lake Beach and Sandy Beach North.

The measures outlined in the policy (particularly restricting access to some of these beach areas) provide a mechanism for protecting these key environmental values whilst still allowing the four wheel driving community to enjoy these natural assets in a responsible manner.

Perceived disadvantages of the Policy

1.       Removal of some currently permitted areas. Driving will no longer be allowed on certain stretches of beach which have historically been used by 4WD vehicles.

Options:

Options available to Council in this matter are:

1.       Adopt the recommendation provided to Council to endorse exhibition of the Draft Vehicles on Beaches Policy for broader community input.

2.       Modify the recommendation and seek changes to the draft Policy prior to exhibiting for community feedback.  However, given that the draft policy currently incorporates stakeholder feedback, it is considered that without broader community input it will be difficult to progress any modifications/changes.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

The draft Policy will reduce environmental impact.

Beaches and their associated dunal systems are vital ecological resources, providing habitat to a variety of native flora and fauna as well as protecting terrestrial areas from coastal erosion processes. Improper use of the beaches compromises these values. The draft Policy provides a means of better protecting sensitive beach environments

•     Social

The draft Policy will reduce access to some beaches as previously outlined. While this will be a cause of concern for some 4WD users, it will improve the experience and safety for those beach users on foot.

The Policy recognises the significant social value beaches hold for the community. The measures are proposed to protect and enhance these values for current and future generations.

•     Civic Leadership

The purpose of Council policies is to ensure transparency and accountability in local government. The implementation enables Council to identify and respond to the community. This is consistent with the My Coffs Strategic Plan objective D1.1- We foster informed and inspired leadership in our community.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Beaches are highly valued by both the local community of Coffs Harbour and the many visitors to our Region. They are a significant driver of tourism for the Region and support a diverse range of recreational activities. Beaches are integral to the lifestyle of Coffs Harbour and contribute to the overall amenity and visual appeal of our City. The Policy promotes protection of beaches and will improve the overall safety and quality of the visitor's experience.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

There are no Delivery Program/Operational Plan implications from exhibition of the draft Policy.

Risk Analysis:

There are no perceived risks from exhibition of the Policy. Risks of conflicts between recreational users and vehicles will be addressed at Arrawarra and Corindi through the proposed reduction in vehicle access area. Restrictions in these locations are recommended to be implemented from 21 December 2018.

Consultation:

Consultation has occurred with a range of both internal and external stakeholders.

The details of the external consultation are detailed at Attachment 2.

The draft Policy has incorporated input from Stakeholders, where relevant/practicable.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Council routinely prepares and reviews Policies.

Implementation Date / Priority:

The Policy will be placed on exhibition following the Council resolution.

Conclusion:

Council has invested resources into preparation of the draft Policy and the Policy is required to protect the environmental, economic and social value of Coffs Harbours Beaches.

Driving on beaches is a legitimate and popular recreational pastime enjoyed by both residents and visitors to the region. Driving on beaches is also important for recreational fishing. It is considered that the draft Policy provides a balanced and sustainable approach to allowing ongoing vehicle access to beaches for the 4WD and fishing community, whilst protecting the safety of other beach users and the sensitive and dynamic beach environment.

It is considered that exhibition of the draft Policy is the appropriate mechanism to provide an opportunity for input from the broader community.

 



 


 


 


 



 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


SI18/28         Coffs Coast Waste Services - Bulky Goods Service

Author:                        Director Sustainable Infrastructure

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

MyCoffs:                      C.2 A natural environment sustained for the future

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

Coffs Coast Waste Services (CCWS) is a partnership between Bellingen Shire, Coffs Harbour City and Nambucca Shire Councils for the purposes of providing waste collection and associated services to the communities of the three Councils.

CCWS has entered into a contract for the waste collection and associated services with Handybin Waste Services (Coffs Harbour) Pty Ltd (Handybin) which commenced in March 2018. One of the contract services accepted by Council at its meeting of 30 March 2017 was the Domestic Waste – Bulky Cleanup Service (Option 4 – PAYG Book-In Service).

At its meeting on 22 November 2018 Council resolved to seek a report be presented to Council regarding the quantum of the Fee for service payable for a Domestic Waste – Bulky Cleanup Service (Option 4 – PAYG Book-In Service). The Fee was previously Made by Council at its meeting of 8 February 2018 following community consultation.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.    Note the ongoing rationale for the previously adopted $44 Bulky Goods Waste Service Charge.

2.    Note the upcoming appointment of an additional resource in the form of the Waste Strategy Officer for the immediate purpose of accelerating the roll out of additional waste diversion from landfill projects.

 

Report

Description of Item:

In March 2017, CCWS awarded contract RFT-658-TO, (a nine year contract which commenced on Monday 5 March 2018), to Handybin Waste Services (Coffs Harbour) Pty Ltd (Handybin). The contract covers the provision of a wide range of waste related services by Handybin to Coffs Harbour, Bellingen and Nambucca residents on behalf of the three CCWS councils.

The model supplies residents with a maximum of two (2) collections at the premises by Handybin per annum (limited to residences which pay the Domestic Waste Charge – Occupied Land), on a fee-for-service (currently $44) basis which is payable by the residents who wish to utilise the service.

Council resolved at its meeting of 9 November 2017 to place the then proposed fee on public exhibition for a 28-day period from Monday 13 November 2017 until close of business on Monday 11 December 2017.

Council subsequently resolved at its meeting of 8 February 2018 to make the fee $44/service.

The Bulky Cleanup Service has been operating well since 5 March 2018, as has the other component to the bulky clean up service model – a voucher system which provides for the occupants of eligible residential dwellings to receive two vouchers which provide for up to 200kg per voucher of bulky household waste to be disposed without further cost to the Englands Road Waste Management Facility.

Issues:

The Previous Service Model – Problems

Council made changes to the previous bulky cleanup service model following consideration of factors including:

·    NSW is, per capita, the second largest producer of waste in the world.

·    CHCC has a 100% diversion from landfill target.

·    The previous system was achieving a very low diversion from landfill result.

·    Bulky Goods are only those items which will not physically fit in a 240 litre bin. More than half of the annual volume was comprised of items which were not ‘bulky goods’ and could/should have been disposed of via the existing three bin service with its high diversion from landfill rates.

·    The previous service model left the streets a mess and an eye-sore for 32 weeks per year,

·    Illegal dumping was exacerbated by people adding to other peoples piles.

·    The Port-Macquarie Hastings Council had implemented a similar system and it had worked very well with very few issues (and continues to do so).

·    Tourists are put off by rubbish on the streets.

·    People were abusing the previous service model.

·    Users of the service were subsidised by the non-users.

The Importance of the Fee

Council’s strategic intent for all waste streams is to ultimately achieve a 100% diversion from landfill target.

In that context, a key component of Council’s strategy for bulky goods waste has been to put in place a price signal and supporting education which may lead to a wide spread community cultural change regarding the generation of bulky goods waste.

A critical element of that strategy is the setting of an appropriate user pays fee for the pickup service.

The intent of this approach is to reverse the currently prevailing culture that bulky goods waste generation is an issue. The development and growth of that culture was facilitated by the previous system which imparted no signal requiring consideration for the future disposal of the thing being purchased. The previous system effectively separated individuals from the accountability for their waste choices.

The previous system dealt with the problem of disposal of a bulky good once it had left the actual ownership of the resident. i.e. The previous system provided no signal to the generators of waste (individuals) that their practices should be amended.

The recent application of a fee (the $44) for the bulky goods pickup service begins to signal that a change in approach by the resident is required – that is, before the waste transfers to public ownership at the kerb.

The charging of a fee acts to directly link the actual generator of the waste (ie. an individual resident) to the size and scale of the waste problem individually created by them.

The size of the fee ($44) is a portion of the actual cost of providing the pickup service. Significant analysis was conducted in arriving at a recommended fee of $44. A fee set too low (by staff definition that would be any fee below $44) would have less impact as a cultural change lever the lower the fee was set. At some point below $44 its effectiveness would disappear.

A fee set too high (by staff definition that would be any fee above $44) would have unintended effects such as driving increases in illegal dumping for example.

Factors Considered in Recommending a Fee

Under Option 4 of the Contract, Council pay Handybin a fee for each bulky goods service provided to a domestic residence. Council also pay, under the NSW Government Section 88 ‘Waste Levy’, a further $81.30 per tonne of bulky goods waste which is landfilled because it cannot be effectively recovered, recycled or reused. Additionally, there are several other disposal costs related to the bulky goods service e.g. cost to recycle mattresses, landfilling costs etc.

The $44 fee quantum was arrived at as a result of Council’s prior consideration of:

·    The cost to Council for the ‘Collection’ (by the contractor),

·    The cost of the NSW EPA Waste Levy per tonne,

·    The gate fees / landfill costs / weighbridge costs connected with the disposal of some of the unrecoverable material

·    Recycling costs – i.e. costs associated with diverting recyclables items from landfill e.g. mattress recycling,

·    A review of other Council’s charges for similar services (noting similarities to what other comparable Councils were charging),

·    Establishing price signals and education leading to community cultural change regarding the generation of bulky household waste – and to maximise recovery, recycling and re- use,

·    Affordability of the service,

·    Amenity of streets under the previous service model,

·    Better options for recovery by having a two-pass collection to pick out (and recover) metals, whitegoods, e-waste and mattresses.

Economic Factors Considered in Recommending a $44 Fee

The price point represents a subsidy of the actual cost incurred by Council in providing the service.

A change which reduces the fee quantum would increase the level of subsidy by Council, and reduce the financial stability of the waste service budget.

(In addition there are numerous other private service providers available for the purpose of waste removal and similar services, providing options for customers – outside any council-provided service. A review of available private contractor rates for such services indicate that they compare favourably to the council service rates. It is noted that a reduction to the Council fee quantum (by increasing the level of Council-subsidy), will potentially contribute to less such private service provision and potentially impact local employment levels.)

Current Performance Level of the New Bulky Goods Service vs the Previous Service

Item

Previous Bulky Goods System

Current Bulky Goods System

Tonnes of Bulky Goods Waste collected at kerb side per annum

2,250 tonnes

Approx. 289 tonnes

Number of User Pays ($44) Collections per year

N/A

Approx. 875 (7 months)

Approx. annual: 1,500

Self-Haul Vouchers Issued per year

N/A

7726 (7 months)

Approx. annual: 10,298

Self-Hauled Tonnes

Insignificant

Approx. 480 tonnes

Total Tonnages of Bulky Goods Waste

2250 tonnes

Approx. 770

% tonnes Diverted from Landfill

5%

40%

 

Performance Summary

The new service has both successfully reduced the quantity of Bulky Goods Waste entering the system whilst also increasing the diversion from landfill percentage from 5% to 40%. During the same period there has been a reduction in the quantity and frequency of illegal dumping on Council controlled lands.

Other Bulky Goods Related Initiatives

Council’s Waste Strategy contains additional initiatives both ongoing and yet-to-be-activated which are designed to support the minimisation of the bulky goods waste stream and maximise its diversion from landfill. Those initiatives include:

·    Development of a Community Recycling Shop (proposed)

·    Buy, Swap and Sell online Workshops (ongoing) 

·    Facebook for Seniors workshop (completed)

·    Regular Toy Swap days (ongoing)

·    Repair cafes/workshops (proposed)

·    Swap meets – at local venues and facilitate street swaps for usable items such as furniture, toys, bikes household appliances and bric a brac etc (proposed)

·    Fashion exchanges to keep clothing out of landfill (ongoing)

·    Social media promotions – reducing household bulky waste (ongoing)

·    E-waste promotion and separate collection (ongoing)

·    Ongoing promotion that scrap metal, whitegoods, e-waste and mattresses are free to dispose of and are recycled.

In recognition of the usefulness of these strategic measures, both proposed and underway, a Waste Strategy Officer role has been created and appointment interviews will be undertaken shortly. The purpose of the new position is to accelerate the roll out of strategic waste initiatives such as those listed above.

Options:

1.       Adopt the recommendation which will see the current Bulky Goods Waste strategy continue with a $44 fee per service.

2.       Amend the recommendation to insert a different Fee for the Bulky Goods Waste Pickup Service acknowledging that a change to the Fee may disrupt current usage patterns and outcomes.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

CCWS provides some of the highest levels of waste services, recycling, reuse and processing in Australia. The existing model for bulky clean up services (since 5 March 2018) has a positive environmental impact. The model has seen an improvement to the levels of resource recovery being achieved – for example: separately collected mattresses, e-waste, white goods and metal are better sorted and recovered.

The provisions of the regional waste management services contracts, including the collection and management of bulky clean up services, reflect and support the targets and key performance indicators of the councils adopted ‘Coffs Coast Region Resource Recovery and Waste Management Strategy: 2015-2027’, and those set out by the NSW Environment Protection Authority in the ‘NSW Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy 2014-2021’.

•     Social

The addition of a charge for Bulky Goods Pickup Services is one component of a suite of measures which are jointly intended to signal the need for a cultural change in the community’s view of waste creation at the source.

•     Civic Leadership

Pursuant to the Local Government Act, Coffs Harbour City Council is responsible for waste removal, treatment and disposal services and facilities.

 

The outcomes of this report are consistent with the Coffs Harbour MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan. Coffs Harbour City Council will continue to provide civic leadership with best practice management.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The new model for bulky clean up services will continue to support local employment and cost effective services for the community.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Expenditure for the existing model for bulky clean up services (from 5 March 2018) is currently included in the Domestic Waste Services budget. The current model for bulky clean up services (since 5 March 2018), at the current rates, will not adversely affect Council’s Operational Plan/Budget.

Risk Analysis:

The major risks that have been identified and evaluated are:

1.       Compliance with Local Government Act regarding fees and charges, and

2.       Council significantly deviating from the current charge quantum.

These risks have been mitigated by compliance with the Act, and by seeking a reasonable, evidence based charge quantum – which has been undertaken.

Consultation:

The Fee of $44 was placed on public exhibition from Monday 13 November 2017 to Monday 11 December 2017 and residents were directed to make a submission online via www.haveyoursay.coffsharbour.nsw.gov.au/bulky-goods-waste-serivce or by writing or emailing Coffs Harbour City Council. 

Implementation Date / Priority:

Is to note the report only.

Conclusion:

It is assessed that adopting the recommendation as written will ensure:

1.       That the new model for bulky clean up services continues to align neatly with the Coffs Coast Region Resource Recovery and Waste Management Strategy 2015-2027 and NSW State and Regional Waste Strategy objectives; and

2.       That the cost of the new model for bulky clean up services provides good value for money and optimises the take-up rate for the community, and the continuity of a new bulky clean up service to a high standard.

These actions are within the requirements of the LG Act and Regulations and will reduce Coffs Harbour City Council's risks with regard to ensuring advantageous waste services.