Coffs Harbour City Council

01 August 2018

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

The above meeting will be held in the Council Administration Building

Cnr Coff and Castle Streets, Coffs Harbour on:

 

Thursday, 9 August 2018

 

The meeting commences at 5.00pm and your attendance is requested.

 

 

AGENDA

 

1.         Opening of Ordinary Meeting

2.         Acknowledgment of Country

3.         Disclosure of Interest

4.         Apologies

5.         Public Addresses / Public Forum

6.         Mayoral Minute

7.         Mayoral Actions under Delegated Authority

8.         Confirmation of Minutes

9.         Rescission Motion

10.      Notices of Motion - General

11.      General Manager’s Reports

12.      Notices of Motion – Business Services

13.      Directorate Reports – Business Services

14.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Communities

15.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Communities

16.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Infrastructure

17.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Infrastructure

18.      Notices of Motion - Trust

19.      Trust Reports

20.      Requests for Leave of Absence

21.      Questions On Notice

22.      Matters of an Urgent Nature

23.      Consideration of Confidential Items (if any)

24.      Close of Ordinary Meeting.

 

 

Steve  McGrath

General Manager

 

 


Order of Business

 

General Manager's Reports

GM18/20         Bunker Cartoon Gallery Extension Proposal.................................... 3

GM18/21         Council Policy.................................................................................................... 64

Notices of Motion Business Services

NOM18/18      Review of Fees and Charges - Council Controlled Reserves... 68

NOM18/19      Transfer of Land............................................................................................... 69

NOM18/20      Opportunities for Activating the City Centre - Development Contributions..................................................................................................... 70

Directorate Reports - Sustainable Communities

SC18/29          Coffs Harbour City Centre - Review of Height and Built Form Controls .................................................................................................................................... 71

Directorate Reports - Sustainable Infrastructure

SI18/18           Solar Lighting Within the LGA and in Particular Gordon Street & Market Street CBD Area, Woolgoolga................................................ 227

SI18/19           Hastings Street, Woolgoolga - Planned Upgrade........................ 233   


GM18/20      Bunker Cartoon Gallery Extension Proposal

Author:                        General Manager

Authoriser:                  General Manager

MyCoffs:                      B.2 A community achieving its potential

Attachments:              ATT1  GM18/20  Bunker Cartoon Gallery Business Case (Revised)  

 

Executive Summary

Approximately three years ago, Council entered into an initial three year licence arrangement with the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc. (BCG Inc.) to enable its occupation of the Bunker Gallery facility with a view to the facility moving toward sustainable operations. The agreement included the provision of a subsidy by Council starting at $86,000 in year one with a view to that subsidy reducing by approximately $5,000 per annum as the facility moved to sustainable operations. Council at its meeting on 12 July 2018 resolved to continue this licence arrangement for a further two year period commencing 1 July 2018.

 

BCG Inc. has submitted a proposal to Council for its consideration. This proposal indicates that whilst the Bunker Gallery operation has improved in recent years, in its present form it is unlikely to achieve financial sustainability. BCG Inc. have therefore proposed that the current facility be improved and substantially extended to increase the exhibition space and functionality, thus attracting a larger and more diverse range of visitors to the facility.

 

Whilst BCG Inc. are proposing to seek State and Federal Government grant funds to construct the works associated with the proposal, they are seeking seed funding of $180,000 to enable the project to reach a status that will enable grant funds to be sought.

 

This report explores the proposal submitted by BCG Inc. and explores the alignment to Council’s adopted strategic direction, in particular Creative Coffs, Council’s Cultural Strategic Plan 2017-22.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Indicate support for the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Business Case as submitted by the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc. for an enhanced gallery exhibition space/facility to complement the existing Bunker Gallery;

2.       Agree to provide seed funding of up to $180,000 to enable the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc. proposal to progress through the various stages to enable State and Federal Grant funding sources to be sought for the capital/construction works, noting that the seed funding is to be provided in a staged manner based on the achievement of project milestones as follows:

2.1.    $40,000 initial payment to enable

2.1.1.     Costs of preparing and lodging a Development Application $20,000

2.1.2.     Costs for initial research of historic exhibition and preparation of demonstration exhibit $20,000

2.2.    Should the outcomes of the items contained within 2.1 above be achieved in the affirmative, a further payment of $25,000 be made available to enable the preparation and writing of detailed grant applications to either State or Federal Governments;

2.3.    Should the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc. be successful in securing adequate funding from State and/or Federal Government Grant sources to enable the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc. proposal to be constructed, the further payment of $115,000 be made available to enable the preparation and submission of documentation for a Certificate of Construction to be acquired;

3.       Resolve that $180,000 funding mentioned in 2 above be funded from Council’s Strategic Initiatives Fund;

4.       Agree to explore tenure options with the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc. to formalise the tenure over the new facility developed as a result of the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc. proposal, should the proposed facility achieve all milestones and be constructed at the City Hill location.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Earlier this year, representatives of the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc. (BCG Inc.) sought an opportunity to brief the Mayor and General Manager in regard to a proposal that they had to effectively extend the existing Bunker Gallery by way of providing an additional exhibition space, café and other facilities above the current facility. The existing Bunker Gallery would continue, whilst the new exhibition space is proposed to create a permanent multi-media exhibition which would trace major events in Australian history from 1900 till today through the eyes of cartoonists. It is also understood that representatives of the BCG Inc. provided an opportunity for Councillors to attend briefings at the Bunker enabling an overview of their vision to be provided.

 

During the meeting with the Mayor and General Manager, it was suggested that should the BCG Inc. desire to progress this proposal, they should submit a business case for Council’s consideration. This was suggested in light of the fact that Council’s current Delivery Program does not contain a project of this nature. Notwithstanding that the BCG Inc. envisages sourcing the bulk of the project costs by accessing State and Federal Grants, they have indicated the need to seek seed funding from Council to enable the most advantageous outcome from grant application processes.

 

A full copy of the business case supplied by BCG Inc. is attached to this report. Aspects of the proposal will be explored further in the Issues section of this report however, in brief the BCG Inc. is seeking $180,000 to enable the proposal to progress.

 

It is fair to say that in the context of the annual operations of the Bunker Gallery since its occupation as a cartoon gallery, the facility has been subsidised considerably, whether that has been in terms of Council’s direct management or under a lease/licence arrangement to a community organisation.

Issues:

For the last three years, the Bunker facility has been managed by the BCG Inc. under a licence arrangement, with Council continuing a subsidy arrangement commencing at $86,000 for the 2015/16 financial year, reducing by $5,000 per annum over the life of the licence tenure. The ultimate aim of the arrangement has been for the BCG Inc. to develop a sustainable operation at the facility that eventually negated the need for a subsidy from Council. Council at its 12 July meeting resolved to extend this licence arrangement for a further two years.

 

The proposal from BCG Inc. indicates that if successful and the Council wished “to rid itself of the Bunker”, an option could be explored to sell the Bunker to a community trust, formed to operate it, independent of Council.

 

The BCG Inc. has indicated that continuing with the current Bunker operation is unlikely to see it achieving financial sustainability in the near future. BCG Inc. has been exploring potential solutions to enable financial sustainability and has indicated that they believe the following proposal would attract solid support from both residents and tourists:

 

1.   “Waterproof the existing bunker by building a self-supporting platform above it and then build another gallery on this platform. The new gallery would look like a modern version of a WW11 ‘Nissen Hut’ to retain the bunker theme. It would double the gallery space and provide room for a café, commercial kitchen & a community work room.

2.   Utilise the new exhibition space to create a permanent multi-media exhibition which would trace major events in Australian history from 1900 till today, through the eyes of cartoonists. Scaled down versions of this exhibition could be toured through Federal and State Parliaments and art galleries throughout Australia to generate additional revenue and to promote the Coffs Coast.

3.   Expand the annual Rotary National Cartoon Awards (now in its 30th year) into an annual Cartoon Festival.”

 

In respect of the first item above, a sum of money (approx. $130,000) has been set aside from the SRV funding available for infrastructure renewal to undertake water proofing of the existing bunker facility. Initial indicators have suggested that this type of expenditure is required on the bunker facility approximately every 10 years due to the nature of the facility and its location underground. It is quite likely that water ingress to the facility occurs from above, but also from the sides and below as a result of seepage from the water table etc. This issue is scheduled to be explored in more detail by the engagement of relevant experts and provision of advice. Whilst providing an “umbrella” above the bunker facility may assist, at this stage it is not possible to indicate with confidence that the need for waterproofing of the facility won’t be required in the future.

 

Whilst the financial projections within the Business Case submitted by BCG Inc. does suggest a move to support the proposal would potentially enable a more sustainable operating environment, i.e. the budget projections through to 2022 do suggest a surplus, there may be some risk associated with reliance on the submitted projections. The proposed budget continues some reliance on Council subsidy and also seems to rely on operational grant funding, source undefined. The budget projections are also silent on depreciation of the new facility and associated maintenance costs. For a building of approximately $1.7m, one could expect an annual maintenance cost in the vicinity of $51,000 per annum and depreciation of approximately $42,500 per annum. It would normally be expected that the annual operating maintenance associated with a facility of this type, under tenure to an external party, would require that this expense be funded from the operations of the facility.

 

Creative Coffs, Council’s Cultural Strategic Plan 2017-2022, explores a range of strategies in an endeavour to achieve outcomes designed to achieve an improved cultural environment for the Coffs Harbour community. It is arguable that the BCG Inc. proposal assists in delivering outcomes that align with Creative Coffs. This report will explore some of these issues.

 

Creative Coffs identified that tourism provides in excess of $434m to the Coffs Harbour LGA economy annually. It also noted that the Coffs Coast Tourism Strategic Plan 2020 has a focus on attracting more visitors, having them stay in the region longer, spend more locally and stay in localities right across the region. Whilst beach visits and scenery appreciation are popular, it was identified that broadening opportunities such as cultural activities could enhance visitor spend in the Coffs Harbour economy.

 

In preparing Creative Coffs, a range of engagement activities with the community were explored. Feedback from the community highlighted the largest single issue as being “a desire for better arts and cultural venues” and further most consultees felt a “need for further investment in facilities and infrastructure, including improved coordination and communication between existing facilities”.

 

Specifically, the following two strategies within Creative Coffs align with the BCG Inc. proposal:

 

Strategy 2.3 – Plan, develop and maintain cultural and community infrastructure, (including facilities and public art) that aligns and supports the goals of the 2030 Plan, a “place making approach” and the Local Growth Management Strategy. Performance Indicator, increased number of and quality of facilities available for arts and cultural activities.

Strategy 2.6 – Advocate and facilitate, where resources allow, provision of affordable spaces for meeting, rehearsing, presenting, teaching, making and performing (both temporary and permanent). Performance Indicator, Built and outdoor infrastructure is in place to support arts and cultural activity. Net growth of spaces available for arts/cultural purposes.

 

Notwithstanding the potential strategic alignment of the BCG Inc. proposal to the Creative Coffs Strategic Plan, Council’s current Delivery Program does not currently make provision for this project, nor of course does the Delivery Program provide a specific funding source. As mentioned elsewhere, the BCG Inc. proposes to seek funding for the project build from State and Federal grants. BCG Inc. have sought a budget estimate for the proposed works from a local building contractor (based on the concept drawings) which suggests that the works would be in the vicinity of $1.57 million to $1.7 million, noting that this estimate excluded a variety of predominantly site related potential costs.

 

To enable preparation of the proposal to reach “grant application ready status”, BCG Inc. is seeking seed funding from Council in the sum of $180,000, noting that this comprises:

 

·    Costs of preparing a Development Application                                             $  20,000
(Architect & Engineering fees, Flora & Fauna Consultant,
Landscape Design, Bushfire Assessment, Traffic & Parking
Assessment, BCA Compliance Assessment, Statement of
Environmental Effects)

·    Costs of submitting documentation for a Construction Certificate                $115,000
(Project Manager’s Fees, Private Certifier Fees, Architectural)

·    Costs for initial research of historic exhibition & preparation of
demonstration exhibit                                                                                     $  20,000

·    Cost associated with preparation of grant applications                                  $  25,000

 

Council does have limited funds available within its Strategic Initiatives Reserve. This reserve has traditionally been maintained as a potential source of funding for strategic projects, predominantly of a capital nature or for projects that have an alignment with long term initiatives that have the potential to deliver on achieving outcomes identified in Council’s Strategic Plans. Should Council decide to support the proposal submitted by BCG Inc., funding of the $180,000 could be sourced from the Strategic Initiatives Reserve.

Options:

1.   Support the proposal submitted by the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc. and provide $180,000 seed funding up front for the purpose of undertaking each of the components identified in the seed funding business case.

2.   Adopt the recommendations in this report and therefore support the proposal submitted by the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc., noting that the requested seed funding will be progressively provided based on key milestone events being achieved.

3.   Consider amending the recommendation with a view to establishing an alternate approach to supporting the proposal submitted by the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc.

4.   Reject the recommendation and effectively not support the proposal submitted by the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no direct environmental impacts as a result of Council’s consideration of this report. Should Council endorse the proposal to move forward to the more detailed planning and assessment phase, environmental impacts will be considered in more detail at this stage.

•     Social

The current Bunker facility provides a range of cultural, artistic, economic and community opportunities for the Coffs Harbour community and its visitors. The proposed addition/extension to the existing Bunker facility would potentially enhance the outcomes for the Coffs Harbour community.

•     Civic Leadership

Progressing the Bunker Cartoon Gallery Inc. proposal would support the objective of the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan: “A vibrant, inclusive place – we recognise the need for enhanced cultural precincts, venues and public art within our region”.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

As mentioned in the Issues section of this report, Council’s Creative Coffs, Cultural Strategic Plan 2017-22 has identified that broadening opportunities within the Coffs Harbour LGA, such as cultural activities, could enhance visitor spend in the Coffs Harbour economy. The rationale for this proposition would appear to be that if you provide more “product” within the City, it adds to the diversity of opportunities for new and interesting experiences, thus proving an attraction for visitors and locals alike. At this stage it is difficult to quantify the $dollar value of potential increased economic benefit for the City/Region.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The proposal put forward by BCG Inc. at this stage is not envisaged within Council’s current Delivery Program or Operational Plan. The request from BCG Inc. is effectively for seed funding to enable the proposal to be brought to spade ready status, thus enabling BCG Inc. to seek funding from the State and Federal Government to enable the delivery of the substantial capital expenditure. The seed funding sought is $180,000 in total, inclusive of the grant writing component, noting that this project is not contained within Council’s current Delivery Program (i.e. no other Council resources have been allocated toward this project).

 

Council presently holds funds within its Strategic Initiatives Fund, noting that these funds have been set aside to fund projects within the LGA that are important for ongoing growth and development of the economic, social, cultural and environmental base of the community. The Fund specifically was established to create a source of funds for Council to pursue future strategic initiatives. Given the alignment of the BCG Inc. proposal to several of the strategies identified in Creative Coffs, it is suggested that it would be appropriate to consider supporting the request for seed funding to the BCG Inc. proposal.

Risk Analysis:

The proposal submitted by BCG Inc. includes some assessment of what they consider to be key risks associated with the success of the proposal, these can be found on page 12 of the Business Case.

 

Effectively, should Council agree to support the proposal submitted by BCG Inc. and provide the initial seed funding, the higher level risks that Council may be exposed to include the following:

 

·    Establishment of a precedent in funding community organisation inspired projects, not currently envisaged within Council’s Delivery Program;

·    The merit based assessment of the development application lodged by BCG Inc. results in refusal;

·    Assuming the DA and other elements of the initial proposal are successful, the grant application to State and/or Federal Government is unsuccessful, resulting in no funding being available for the capital construction of the proposed Bunker Gallery extensions and associated matters;

·    Should the grant application be successful, however the funds awarded are insufficient to enable the completion of the capital project (this may result in further funding being sought from Council in the future);

·    Should all funding necessary be acquired and the enhanced facility is constructed and opened for operation, however the anticipated outcomes are not realised and therefore the operations are not sustainable. This may result in the facility ceasing to operate, with the facility reverting back to Council’s overall responsibility. This would mean that a substantial asset would remain on Council’s Balance Sheet, with ongoing depreciation and other costs impacting the Profit and Loss Statement, whilst Council explored some other sustainable operation for the facility.

Consultation:

Up to this point in time the following consultation has occurred:

 

·    Representatives of BCG Inc. have met with the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and General Manager to discuss the concept;

·    BCG Inc. have provided an opportunity for Councillors to attend a briefing on the proposal;

·    It is understood that some other stakeholders of BCG Inc. have been briefed/consulted on the proposal;

·    Dialogue has continued between the Chairman of BCG Inc. and Council’s General Manager;

·    Internally, various Council officers have been consulted with a view to an initial analysis of the proposal and to seek input to assist with the report.

 

Should Council support the request for seed funding of the BCG Inc. proposal, further consultation on the proposal will occur with the community through the development application process and it would be expected that BCG Inc. will consult widely with the State and Federal Government in its endeavours to secure adequate funding for the capital necessary for the project.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

As mentioned in this report, the proposal does align with aspects of the Creative Coffs Strategy. There are no precedents per se.

 

There will be various statutory requirements to be met as the proposal progresses through any development application or construction certificate process, state or federal grant application processes and potential leasing/licencing to enable occupation of the facility by BCG Inc.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Should Council agree to support the proposal submitted by BCG Inc. the initial payment contained within the recommendation could be made immediately, thus enabling BCG Inc. to prepare a development application for submission and consideration. This payment would also enable the initial research of the proposed historic exhibition and preparation of the demonstration exhibit.

 

Should the milestone events be achieved in the affirmative, the remainder of the funding would then be made available to enable the construction certificate process and the grant application to be made.

Conclusion:

The proposal submitted by BCG Inc. commences by raising concern that the Bunker Gallery in its present form is arguably not able to be progress toward the desired sustainable operating position due to constraints of the existing facility. The BCG Inc. proposal envisages a substantial extension of the existing Bunker Gallery Facility to enable enhanced exhibition space and associated exhibits. A café and commercial kitchen is also envisaged to enhance the use of the facility for visitors experience and functions.

 

Given the alignment of the proposal to Creative Coffs, it is suggested that seed funding, based on achievement of key milestones, be provided for the proposal on the basis that BCG Inc. will be seeking capital funding by way of State and Federal grant sources.

 

 


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GM18/21      Council Policy

Author:                        Risk Management Coordinator

Authoriser:                  Group Leader Governance

MyCoffs:                      D.1 Our leaders give us confidence in the future

Attachments:               ATT1         GM18/21   Risk Management Policy

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of policy is to document Council’s intent, commitment and/or a position on a particular topic as well as ensure transparency and accountability in local government.  This report presents four policies and one procedure for Council adoption.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council adopt the Risk Management Policy.

 

Report

Description of Item:

The purpose of policy is to document Council’s intent, commitment and/or a position on a particular topic as well as ensure transparency and accountability in local government.  The following table provides detail of the policies that are ready for adoption.

 

Policy/Procedure Name

Policy/Procedure Detail

Risk Management Policy

This policy was adopted by Council on 23 April 2017. Following the further implementation of the risk management program, which included the review of all risk management documentation and processes, the policy has been updated to reflect the growing risk maturity of Council.

 

The policy describes how council understands and manages uncertainty through risk management. It seeks to provide a plain english policy statement, with the operational detail moved to the Risk Management Framework.

 

The policy is aligned with Australian and International risk management Standard AS/NZS ISO 31000 and the NSW Treasury Risk Management Toolkit for NSW Public Sector Agencies.

 

Issues:

There are no issues associated with this report.

Options:

It is considered that the following options are available to Council:

 

1.    Adopt the recommendation provided to Council.

2.    Amend the recommendation or policy/procedure provided to Council and then adopt.

3.    Reject the policy/policies provided to Council.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental issues associated with this report.

•     Social

Policies are an important communication tool used by Council for providing our community and general public detail on strategic aims, commitments and obligations.

•     Civic Leadership

Policies are important for ensuring transparency and accountability in local government.  Their implementation enables Council to identify and respond to the community.  This is consistent with the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan strategy D.1 Our leaders give us confidence in the future.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

There are no broad economic impacts associated with the implementation of the recommendations.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The ongoing development and review of Council policies and plans are accommodated within Council’s budget structure.  This expenditure is monitored through Council’s monthly and quarterly budget reviews.

Risk Analysis:

There is no perceived risk in the adoption of the policy listed in this report.

Consultation:

Consultation has occurred with relevant internal stakeholders.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

These are detailed within each policy/procedure as required.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Immediate.

Conclusion:

That council adopt the attached policy.

 

 


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NOM18/18   Review of Fees and Charges - Council Controlled Reserves

Attachments:              Nil

 

Motion:

Councillor Cecato has given notice of his intention to move the following:

"That Council undertake a review of its Fees and Charges associated with the use of Council controlled reserves, excluding sporting fields, and provide a report and draft policy to Council for consideration."

 

 

Rationale:

“The Crown Land Management Act 2016 came into force on 1 July 2018. This Act has given Council the ability to manage Crown Land under the Local Government Act 1993 and this allows the Council to look at different options with the way that it issues licences to use both Council owned land and Crown Land under this Act. This may provide Council the opportunity to amalgamate fees for the use of this land, where previously the Council, as the Corporate Manager for different Reserve Trusts, was required to charge fees for individual reserves.”

Staff Comment:

A review can be undertaken with a report and draft policy provided for Council consideration.

 


NOM18/19   Transfer of Land

Attachments:          Nil

 

Motion:

Councillor Townley has given notice of her intention to move the following:

"That Council investigate the transfer of land housing Kulai Preschool."

 

 

Rationale:

“Kulai Preschool has requested the transfer of their land.  This is in keeping with the objective in Council’s Property Strategy regarding Child Care Centres.”

Staff Comment:

Council is in receipt of a letter from representatives of the Kulai Preschool Aboriginal Corporation which is being attended to.  A report can be prepared.

 

 


NOM18/20   Opportunities for Activating the City Centre - Development Contributions

Attachments:          Nil

 

Motion:

Councillor Amos has given notice of his intention to move the following:

"That a report be provided outlining the opportunities for activating the city centre that can occur by waiving development contributions for residential development in the Coffs Harbour City Centre in the short term."

 

 

Rationale:

“A strong and vibrant city centre is critical to the success of our area. This needs to be supported by a strong residential component that can drive 24/7 activation of the city centre. The concession on development contributions would be subject to immediate and comprehensive commitment to developing land parcels in the city centre precinct with a strong component of residential.”

Staff Comment:

A report can be provided.

  


SC18/29       Coffs Harbour City Centre - Review of Height and Built Form Controls

Author:                        Planner / Urban Designer

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

MyCoffs:                      B.1 A thriving and sustainable local economy

Attachments:              ATT1  SC18/29   Coffs Harbour CBD - Review of Height and Built Form Controls - Final Study Report - July 2018

ATT2  SC18/29   Planning Proposal (Version 1 - Gateway Determination)

ATT3  SC18/29   Development Control Plan Amendment 11 (CBD Height Review)

ATT4  SC18/29   Submission Responses Summary

ATT5  SC18/29   CONFIDENTIAL          Submissions

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(e) of the Local Government Act as it contains information that would, if disclosed, prejudice the maintenance of law.  

 

Executive Summary

At its Ordinary Meeting of 9 February 2017, Council resolved to undertake a review of building heights in the Coffs Harbour City Centre. Consultants were subsequently engaged to undertake this review. A draft report for the building heights review was presented to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 7 December 2017. Council resolved to endorse and publicly exhibit the report in 2018.

The purpose of this report is to present the outcomes of the public exhibition process and the Coffs Harbour CBD – Review of Height and Built Form Controls Final Study Report – July 2018 (Attachment 1) to Council. The report states that an increase in the maximum height of buildings and floor space ratio controls within the city centre can be achieved without impacting on the amenity of key public spaces, provided that such changes are supported by additional local built form controls. The proposed draft amendments for Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 and Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan (DCP) 2015 (Attachments 2 and 3) have been developed in accordance with recommendations of the review process.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Adopt the Coffs Harbour CBD – Review of Height and Built Form Controls Final Study Report – July 2018 (Attachment 1).

2.       Endorse and forward a Planning Proposal (Attachment 2) to amend the Height and Built Form Controls of Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2013, to NSW Planning and Environment seeking a “Gateway Determination”.

3.       Request that the Secretary of the NSW Department of Planning and Environment issue a written authorisation to Council to exercise delegation of the plan making functions under section 3.36(2) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 in respect of the Planning Proposal.

4.       Publicly exhibit the Planning Proposal and undertake government agency consultation subject to the terms of the Gateway Determination issued by the NSW Department of Planning and Environment.

5.       Publicly exhibit Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan 2015 Amendment Number 11 (CBD Height Review) (Attachment 3) concurrently with the associated Planning Proposal.

6.       Note that a further report will be brought back to Council for consideration following the public exhibition of the Planning Proposal and Development Control Plan amendment.

 

Report

Description of Item:

At its meeting of 9 February 2017, Council considered a Notice of Motion regarding Coffs Harbour City Centre height restrictions and resolved the following:

1.   That Council commence urgently a review of the building heights in the CBD of Coffs Harbour (as defined in the CBD Masterplan) with a view to seeking an amendment to the LEP based on the findings.

2.   That a funding report to commence the review be presented to Council at the next meeting.

At its meeting of 23 March 2017, Council subsequently resolved:

That Council endorse the Project Plan (Attachment 1) and Consultant Brief (Attachment 2) for the Review of the Coffs Harbour CBD Height and Built Form Controls.

Consultants, Conybeare Morrison were subsequently engaged to undertake this review. A draft report for the building heights review was presented to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 7 December 2017, with the following resolution:

1.   Endorse the draft Review of the Coffs Harbour CBD Height and Built Form Controls (Attachment 1) and place the draft Review on public exhibition until mid-February 2018.

2.   Note that a further report will be brought back to Council for consideration of any submissions following the public exhibition of the draft Review.

The purpose of this report is to present the outcomes of the public exhibition process and to seek Council’s endorsement to proceed with amendments to local planning controls based on recommendations contained within the Coffs Harbour CBD – Review of Height and Built Form Controls Final Study Report – July 2018 (Attachment 1). These recommendations are for a significant increase to the height of buildings and floor space ratio controls for the ‘Central Business District (CBD) core area’ which was refined in the early stages of the review. The ‘CBD core area’ is bounded by the Pacific Highway, Vernon Street, Earl Street and Park Avenue and corresponds with the existing mapped 17m (4 storey) height limit as stipulated in Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 2013.

The final report recommends that the maximum height of buildings is significantly increased within the ‘CBD Core area’ from 17m to 44m. Similarly, the final report recommends that the maximum floor space ratio for buildings within the ‘CBD core area’ is significantly increased from 2.5:1 to 4.5:1, with the exception of key sites that will directly affect City Square and key public parks.

The recommendations of the final report (Attachment 1) are supported by specific testing and analysis that has been undertaken for a number of land parcels within the ‘CBD core area’. This additional analysis demonstrates that an increase in the maximum height of buildings and an increase to the floor space ratio controls can be achieved without impacting on the amenity of key public spaces provided that such changes are supported by additional local built form controls. This is discussed further in the issues sections of the report.

The proposed draft amendments for Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 and Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan (DCP) 2015 (Attachments 2 and 3) have been developed in accordance with recommendations of the review process.

Issues:

·        Coffs Harbour City Centre Masterplan 2031

The vision of the Coffs Harbour City Centre Masterplan 2031 is to be the key retail, commercial and entertainment precinct for the region, with an attractive urban environment. A significant increase in building heights and more flexible floor space ratio controls will assist in facilitating new retail, commercial and residential development in the city centre. To ensure that this development aligns within the Masterplan vision to create an attractive urban environment, additional planning controls are also proposed to ensure that design excellence in built form outcomes is realised.

·        Activation of the City Centre

One of the main objectives of zone B3 Commercial Core under Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 is to ensure that the scale and nature of future development reinforces the role of the CBD as the primary commercial, employment and retail centre in the region. Another is to ensure that the design of new buildings makes a positive contribution to the streetscape via the retention and creation of view corridors and the provision of a safe public domain.

The recommendations contained within the final report (Attachment 1) align with these existing objectives contained within Coffs Harbour LEP 2013. Increased building heights and more flexible floor space ratio controls will assist to facilitate commercial, employment and retail development within the city centre, whilst the proposed new built form local provisions will ensure that street amenity and solar access outcomes are protected.

·        Floor Space Ratios

Modifications to floor space ratio controls within the ‘CBD core area’ are recommended in the final report (Attachment 1) to encourage the amalgamation of sites to a size which permits a good built form outcome and efficient development of prime city centre properties. An increase to the floor space ratio controls for buildings within the ‘CBD core area’ is recommended from 2.5:1 to 4.5:1, with the exception of key sites that will directly affect city square and key public parks. A lower floor space ratio for buildings on these keys sites is required to reduce building bulk and associated amenity impacts.

Yield calculations that have been generated as part of the review show that an additional 115,700 m2 of commercial gross floor area could be generated within the ‘CBD core area’. It is estimated that this would satisfy commercial floor space demand for 80 plus years, based on current market conditions.

·        Additional Local Built Form Controls

Workshopping of different scenarios with the community during 2017 identified a difference of opinion about whether built form controls should be imposed. Opinions ranged from increasing maximum building heights and floor space ratios with no amenity controls; to introduction of additional built form controls if additional height is allowed, so as to protect the amenity of the city centre.

Public exhibition of the draft building heights review report attracted only two written submissions, both seeking a maximised approach. In response to this, additional testing and analysis was undertaken for randomly selected sites within the city centre. This analysis looked at the development potential for each site; with and without any additional amenity and built form local planning controls.

This analysis demonstrated the need for, and the subsequent inclusion of, the additional local planning controls to ensure that a positive urban design outcome is realised for the city centre. For buildings above eight stories in height, improved urban design outcomes result when a podium and tower building is provided as opposed to a perimeter-block building which concentrates the building mass at the street frontage. If perimeter-block building types extended over eight stories in height, they would create large continuous walls of buildings of significant mass and of inappropriate scale, would block solar access to streets throughout the day and limit opportunities for the sharing of views. A podium and tower building above eight stories will provide a better built form outcome by providing improved solar access, natural ventilation and opening up opportunities for views from upper levels of buildings.

The final report (Attachment 1) recommends the introduction of additional local provisions to ensure that the amenity currently enjoyed within the city centre is maintained and enhanced; thereby encouraging people to live and work in the city centre. The recommendations seek to facilitate a built form outcome that maximises development potential, whilst also maintaining important urban amenity, such as streets with buildings which have a comfortable human scale and which incorporate city plazas, city parks and footpaths that have adequate sunlight during winter. Additional built form controls are proposed as follows:

-     Solar Access

The proposed addition of a new local provision within Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 and amended front setback requirements within Coffs Harbour DCP 2015 will ensure solar access will be maintained to important public spaces and at the key lunchtime hours of the day in the middle of winter. City square, the southern footpaths of the city’s spine and city parks are seen as important public places to protect.

-     Street Frontage

Many small and narrow allotments exist in the city centre and these sites, when considered in isolation, are unsuitable for the development of tall buildings (of 13 or 14 storeys height). In acknowledging the existence of numerous long and narrow allotments within the city centre, the final report (Attachment 1) recommends consolidation of narrow sites and a minimum street frontage for each resulting development. The final report and the additional testing analysis demonstrate that the introduction of this new local planning control is necessary to ensure that visually, buildings have an appropriate overall horizontal proportion compared to their vertical proportions and to prevent the creation of unviable floor plates and extensive blank side boundary walls.

The recommended minimum frontage requirement will only apply to buildings greater than 28m in height within zone B3 Commercial Core under Coffs Harbour LEP 2013. The minimum frontage requirement will not apply to buildings less than 28m in height, as the existing setback requirements and floor space ratio controls will provide a satisfactory urban design outcome for buildings of this height.

·        Parking

During the consultation phase of the building heights review, Council’s parking requirements and associated development contributions were identified as potentially stifling development within the city centre. This issue is outside the scope of the current review. Council is aware of this matter and has identified a project within its Delivery Program to undertake a review of parking requirements and development contributions within the city centre. Timing of this project is uncertain at this stage as it remains unfunded.

Options:

Council has two primary options in relation to this matter, including:

1.   Resolve to adopt the final report (Attachment 1) and proceed with amendments to local planning controls based on the recommendations within the final report. This option would provide a pathway for a significant uplift in allowable building height and floor space ratios within the ‘CBD core area’.

2.   Resolve not to adopt the final building heights review report (Attachment 1) or to proceed with amendments to local planning controls based on the final report. This option would result in the existing building height and floor space ratio controls applying to land within the CBD core area.

This report recommends that Council pursue Option 1 as outlined.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

The recommendations contained within this report are unlikely to result in adverse environmental impacts.

•     Social

The introduction of additional local planning controls will address issues raised by the community during the building heights review process in relation to quality built form outcomes, solar access to key public spaces, and amenity/visual impacts. It will also promote a positive pedestrian experience that will assist to activate and increase the vibrancy of the city centre. This reflects Council’s long-term strategic vision for the city as endorsed in its Local Growth Management Strategy; MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan, Coffs Harbour City Centre Masterplan 2031, Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 and Coffs Harbour DCP 2015.

•     Civic Leadership

The recommendations contained within this report are influenced by the following objectives of the MyCoffs CSP:

-     B1.2 - We attract people to work, live and visit in the Coffs Harbour local government area.

-     C1.1 - We create liveable spaces that are beautiful and appealing.

-     D1.1 - We foster informed and inspired leadership in our community.

-     D1.2 - We undertake effective engagement and are informed.

-     D2.2 - We collaborate to achieve the best possible future for all the Coffs Harbour area.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The recommendations contained within this report provide a technical review and analysis of built form characteristics that should be achieved through appropriate built form controls. The recommended actions endeavour to increase the capacity of the city centre to foster economic growth and to meet the demographic needs of the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area which is characterised by a high population growth rate and an ageing population.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The recommendations contained within the final report (Attachment 1) are unlikely to impact on Council’s Delivery Program or Operational Plan. The building heights review has been funded through Council’s 2016/17 Operational Plan. Subsequent amendments to local planning controls, if endorsed by Council, would be undertaken as a business as usual process.

Risk Analysis:

By not proceeding with the recommendations contained within the final report (Attachment 1), development opportunities for higher buildings in the ‘CBD core area’ may not be realised. Further risk analysis would be undertaken during the local planning controls amendment process, should Council choose to support the recommendations of this report.

Consultation:

The community, key stakeholders and businesses within the city centre were consulted during the building height review process. Input to the review was invited through a variety of channels at various stages as outlined in the final report (Attachment 1).

Public exhibition of the draft building heights review report attracted two written submissions. A submission response document has been prepared (Attachment 4) and a confidential copy of all submissions received is provided (Attachment 5).

Should Council resolve to amend local planning controls, additional public consultation is required to be undertaken in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (‘EP&A Act’).

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The following policies and statutory documents have been considered in the preparation of this report: North Coast Regional Plan 2036; EP&A Act 1979 and Regulations; Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy; MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan; Coffs Harbour City Centre Masterplan 2031; Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2013 and Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan 2015.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Should Council resolve to support the recommendations within the final report (Attachment 1) and proceed with amendments to local planning controls, the timeframes for completion is governed by the EP&A Act 1979 and will be determined by the NSW Department of Planning and Environment. The anticipated overall projected timeline is summarised within the Planning Proposal (Attachment 2).

Conclusion:

The purpose of this report is to present the outcomes of the public exhibition process and the Coffs Harbour CBD – Review of Height and Built Form Controls Final Study Report – July 2018 (Attachment 1) to Council; and to seek Council’s endorsement to proceed with amendments to local planning controls within the Coffs Harbour City Centre. The proposed amendments will result in a significant increase to height of building and floor space ratio controls.

The recommendations are supported by specific testing and analysis that has been undertaken for randomly selected land parcels within the CBD core which demonstrated that an increase in the maximum height of buildings and an increase to the floor space ratio controls can be achieved without impacting on the amenity of key public spaces, provided that such changes are supported by additional local built form controls.

The proposed draft amendments for Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 and Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan (DCP) 2015 (Attachments 2 and 3) have been developed in accordance with recommendations of the review process.

 


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SI18/18         Solar Lighting Within the LGA and in Particular Gordon Street & Market Street CBD Area, Woolgoolga

Author:                        Works Program Co-ordinator

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

MyCoffs:                      C.1 Liveable neighbourhoods with a defined identity

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

There are in total 4500 street lights in the Coffs Harbour LGA. Including those in the Woolgoolga CBD, Market Street, Queen Street and Arkan Avenue. Woolgoolga currently has 289 street lights or 6.4% of the LGA total.

 

The existing LGA-wide network is installed and maintained by Essential Energy, and paid for by Council, in accordance with both Australia Standard AS/NZS1158 Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces, and other approved street lighting standards.

 

Two quotations have been obtained to test the possible cost of solar street lights for the purposes of this report. The current annual operating cost to Council for existing (reticulated) street lights is approximately $257 per light. This cost will fall by 25% to approximately $200 per light per annum later this calendar year when 70% of the existing network (mostly sodium lights) is changed to LED. By comparison, the equivalent operating cost for a suitable solar light is approximately $300 per light per annum in the best case scenario.

 

There are some additional risks pertaining to solar street lighting: the system would periodically fail during prolonged periods of low light and wet weather; and the necessary batteries would be susceptible to flooding in some places (for ease of servicing reasons they are kept at ground level).

 

These same periods are also most high risk time for vehicle crashes within the LGA. As a consequence, Council may be exposed to an additional risk of liability if inoperable solar lights were to be identified as a causative factor.

 

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Note the costing for Solar Street lighting in the report.

2.       Continue to investigate the sustainability of utilising solar lighting for streets and other installations.

3.       Investigate provision of street lighting in Queen Street, Market Street CBD area and other streets in Woolgoolga and add any required additional new lights to the New Street Lighting Program priority list.

 


 

Report

Description of Item:

Council resolved on 12 July 2018 that:

 

“Council receive a report outlining a costing for Solar Lighting within the Coffs Harbour LGA, including Queen Street, Market Street CBD area and other streets without street lights in Woolgoolga, eg Arkan Ave.  Quotes to be received in accordance with the procurement policy.”

 

Currently there are 4500 high pressure sodium vapour streetlights in the LGA. Woolgoolga CBD and immediate surrounds, including the CBD, Market Street, Queen Street and Arkan Avenue currently has 289 streetlights (see attached map; note an additional streetlight has been installed in Arkan Avenue in the last 12 months). The existing network is installed by Essential Energy in accord with AS/NZS1158 Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces, and the Public Lighting Code. Power charges for the streetlights are currently $563,400 per annum and maintenance, renewal and running costs are $638,960 per annum – a total of $1,202,160 per annum. This is a total cost for maintenance and power of $267 per streetlight per year. The cost includes replacement of parts, including lamps.

 

At the Council meeting dated 27 July 2017, Council voted to allow Light Emitting Diode (LED) technology to be utilised for any new or upgraded street lights. In accordance with Council’s Renewable Energy and Emissions Reduction Plan (REERP), the amount of $750,000 has been allocated in the current 2018/19 Budget for a bulk upgrade of streetlights to LED technology. This will allow the upgrading of street lights capable to be converted to LEDs, and will realise both a reduction of carbon footprint, and a reduction of the cost to operate, maintain, renew lamps and power the lights, in the order of $337,000 per year. This brings the cost to operate, maintain and replace each light to less than $200 per year. It will be possible, given the standard specifications of these lights, to introduce control of lux levels (for example on low use roads after midnight) which would provide more savings. Essential Energy have scheduled the upgrade to LEDs to start in August 2018.  

 

Council has one solar street light at the intersection of Solitary Islands Way and Sherwood Creek Road. This was installed at an intersection which required a street light but for which there was no nearby power source. Roads and Maritime Services approved and installed the light as part of the Highway upgrade works. It is a “V-category” light which is the standard for main roads. (Street lights in residential areas are generally “P-Category”). The solar panel and battery are located in an optimum position on a separate flag from the lamp pole.

 

Council currently operates solar panels on its flood warning system. The panels require maintenance every quarter with some areas presenting inconsistent power levels due to shadowing, even if it is affecting as low as 1% of the panel.

 

Council allocates $20 000 per annum to install new streetlights. Eight street lights were installed during the 2017–2018 financial year (average of approximately $2,500 each). An assessment is conducted on every new request and the following criteria are considered:

 

·    Number of crashes

·    Proximity to an intersection

·    Category of road (Regional, arterial, local etc)

·    Distance from existing streetlights

·    Road environment.

 

As per Council’s resolution, two quotes were obtained for a P category solar street light unit demonstrating a potential $3500 to $7000 supply and installation cost. The unit contains a solar panel and a battery box at the base of the pole with typical 4-day autonomy if solar charging is compromised.

One company quoted the life of a battery as 5-7 years with a cost of $500 to replace. Council’s experience with the solar powered flood warning system is that the panels require cleaning every three months. They are also affected by shadowing – particularly from trees. Information obtained by Council indicates that solar streetlights have an average of four days’ autonomy, so prolonged overcast weather could create a risk of failure at the same times of heightened crash risk. Further investigation would be required to determine the cost of maintaining levels of service comparable to street lights connected to the grid.

Solar street lighting is not included on Essential Energy’s list of standard luminaires, and so would not be included in the current service level agreement. Solar street lighting would therefore need to be installed and managed directly by Council.

Possible additional costs would include a concrete anchor on the poles to provide for the impact of the solar panel on wind-load; maintenance costs including regular cleaning of the solar panels and management of vegetation adjacent to the solar panels as well as checking and replacing batteries which would be vulnerable to flooding etc.

Non-standard fittings that are not included on the approved standard luminaire list would become solely Council’s liability, and would not be adaptable for Smart City requirements, or upgradeable for new technology.

Estimate Cost Comparison between existing reticulated power street lights and solar street lights over a five year period

·        Existing - Reticulated street lights

Installation costs                                                                                                 $3,000

Provision of power, maintenance, and replacement cost

for five years (5x$200)                                                                                       $1,000

Total Cost for a five year period.                                                                   $4,000

 

·        Proposed - Solar street lights

Installation costs (best case)                                                                              $3,500

Battery depreciation (each five years)                                                               $   500

Provision of Maintenance (four times/year, at $50 per visit)                             $1,000

Total cost for a five year period                                                                     $5,000

 

 

Summary of Cost Analysis and Comparison

Over a five year period, reticulated power street lights (existing) are approximately $1,000 cheaper compared to the best-case solar light replacement. This does not include the cost of any damage repairs or major infrastructure replacements (depreciation) that may be necessary for solar street lights.

The ongoing annual operating and maintenance cost, including depreciation and damage replacement for each existing reticulated light is approximately $257 per light per year (reducing to $200 this calendar year). The comparison costs for a solar light is approximately $300/year PLUS depreciation and damage replacement.

Depreciation and damage replacement costs are currently borne by Essential Energy for all current street lights, but would need to be borne by Council for any future solar lights, making the economic comparison even more advantageous in favour of the existing reticulated street lights. 

Current Renewable Energy Actions.

Council will be fitting photovoltaic (PV) installations on eighteen (18) Council owned assets. This project was developed following a resolution at the Council meeting dated 14 April 2016 adopting the Renewable Energy and Emissions Reduction Plan (REERP), along with its associated targets:

·        Coffs Harbour City Council will reduce its per annum corporate emissions (tonnes CO2-e) from 2010 levels by 25% by 2020 and by 50% by 2025.

·        Coffs Harbour City Council energy use to consist of 25% renewables by 2020, 50% renewables by 2025 and 100% renewables by 2030.

Under this adopted plan and its associated targets, Coffs Harbour City Council will be seeking proposals from suitably qualified design and construct contractors for Photovoltaic (PV) system installations on eighteen (18) Council owned assets throughout the Coffs Harbour LGA.

The intent of this project is to generate renewable energy to be used by Council’s assets, as we work towards Council’s corporate targets of 100% renewable energy by 2030 and 50% reduction in emissions by 2025.

The design and construct works will provide all materials, labour, transport, tools, plant, applications and other items necessary for the design, supply, installation and commission of eighteen (18) photovoltaic (PV) rooftop and/or ground mounted systems at Council-owned sites that will generate a minimum of 1558.5mWh per annum.

The project will be delivered through design and construction contracts. The expected start date for the D&C contractor is August 2018.

Additionally, a key outcome of the Water and Sewer Strategy which is currently being developed is to ensure all operations are carbon neutral.

Issues:

There are many factors to be considered with the installation of street lights, particularly if they are to form Council assets, and especially if they are to operate outside the available levels of service agreements with Essential Energy.

A lighting study would be required to assess the requirements and effectiveness, as well as the installation and maintenance costs of solar street lighting. The specifications and costs would be assessed on a case by case basis, taking into account the road environment, orientation of the solar panels, average daylight hours, shadowing and the suitability of the unit for the conditions.

For example, if the battery is in the ground it is susceptible to damage from flooding.

Notwithstanding the additional risks to Council of installing street lighting that is not on the currently approved list, there is currently no identifiable cost benefit to residents in the retro-fitting of solar street lighting to existing street lights. The current stock of street lights meets appropriate standards, and will decrease in cost with the installation of LED lights.

There are obvious environmental benefits arising from the installation of solar lighting, however, in general, solar lights are more effective in reserves and park areas where there are limited power options. Council staff are currently considering solar options for a CCTV / lighting project in Toormina funded from the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science Safer Communities Grant. The project will investigate solar lighting in Toormina Skate Park and in a Council property at the rear of Toormina Gardens Shopping Centre. There are no existing reticulated power sources at either location, but there is adequate exposure to sunlight. Solar lighting allows for portability in the case of the skate park should it be relocated in the future. The projects will also trial the use of wind and battery options in addition to solar.

A third site under consideration for lighting powered by renewable energy is the existing car park in Duke Street.

Options:

Option 1: Do nothing as there are existing street lights in the nominated streets which are operating at a sustainable cost level.

 

Option 2: Review the demand for street lighting following the installation of LED street lights this calendar year, with an option to provide new LED street lights in nominated streets where required, subject to the annual budget for new street lights.

 

Option 3: Resolve to provide the additional funds to provide street lights in the in the nominated streets where required. 

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Fitting new lights off the grid would not increase Council’s carbon emissions in line with the REERP. The new technology has no glare which reduces light pollution. However, this also may be achieved with the imminent provision of LED lamps or not lighting the street at all.

•     Social

Street lights provide increased safety for vehicles, particularly at intersections and are often requested by community members to increase safety comfort levels for pedestrians. Generally, priority is given to road safety requirements.

•     Civic Leadership

The street light program helps Council achieve its goals of safe design in the public realm, road safety and meeting the needs of people who live here. These goals contribute to the MyCoffs outcomes of Community Well-Being and Liveable Neighbourhoods with a Defined Identity and A Natural Environment Sustained for the Future.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Solar street lights can be installed with no trenching or cabling, and no grid connection costs. There would be no increased electricity costs. However, there would be increased installation costs due to the solar panel and batter enclosure, and on-going maintenance resources would be required.

 

Additional staff resources would be required to investigate the feasibility of solar street lighting on a case by case basis.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Council has committed $750,000 to the replacement of high pressure sodium lamps to an LED luminaire alternative, and $20 000 for the installation of new street lights across the LGA. Solar lights would be an additional cost to install and maintain, but Council would not incur any additional electricity charges. As shown in the body of the report, there is no cost benefit at this stage in using solar street lighting.

Risk Analysis:

There are cost and liability risks for Council associated with the installation of non-standard street lighting outside the current agreement with Essential Energy.

 

Given that street lights are principally used to reduce vehicle crashes, there is a risk to Council of the light failing during prolonged low light, possibly in hazardous weather conditions.

 

There would be increased risks of the weight of a solar light on a frangible pole if a vehicle collides with the pole.

Consultation:

Council received a non-detailed quote from two solar street light providers for this report.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

AS/NZS1158 Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces.

NSW Public Lighting Code 1 January 2006 v2

1.         June 2018 Issues Paper, NSW Electricity Distribution Determinations; Sec 10.1; Ausgrid, Endeavour Energy, Essential Energy, 2019 - 2024, Australian Energy Regulator

Implementation Date / Priority:

Not applicable

Conclusion:

Council has a current agreement for street lighting provision with Essential Energy. The cost to Council for the provision of street lighting under that agreement is currently more economically feasible than could be achieved with solar street lighting. The replacement of existing high sodium vapour street lights with LED luminaires will further reduce the annual cost of the street lights to less than $200 per light by the end of this financial year.

 

At present, the level of development of solar technology would not guarantee consistent levels of service and would incur additional maintenance costs and risks.

 

Gordon Street, Market Street and the Woolgoolga CBD Area are included in the program to have their existing street lights upgraded to LED. If additional lighting is required in those same areas that issue could be resolved via Council’s existing New Street Light Program.

 


SI18/19         Hastings Street, Woolgoolga - Planned Upgrade

Author:                        Group Leader Strategic Asset Management

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

MyCoffs:                      C.1 Liveable neighbourhoods with a defined identity

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

Notice of Motion 18/10 requires an assessment of potential parking options in Hastings Street, Woolgoolga.  Council staff have assessed existing carparking options and have identified two projects for potential parking upgrades. Additional formal car spaces will also result from the completion of a current private development on Hastings Street.

 

Council currently has no plans to conduct any work on Hastings Street as the road pavement condition has been assessed via the asset management planning process to be in reasonable condition (relative to other road pavements within the LGA).

 

Council has an annual road renewal budget of approximately $3.2m which has been allocated to priority roads across the LGA for this financial year. $1.6m of that amount has been allocated (via the adopted budget) to two significant road renewal projects in Woolgoolga – Wharf and Waterloo Streets. Council could, if it deemed Hastings Street to be of greater priority, reallocate the majority of the current Woolgoolga share from Wharf and Waterloo Street projects to Hastings Street.

 

This report however recommends that Council consider a renewal of Hastings Street within the next four year renewal cycle.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council note the report and have the upgrade of Hastings Street evaluated on the pavement renewal program in the next 4 year renewal cycle.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Council resolved at the Ordinary Meeting of 28 June, 2018 as follows:

 

“1.    That Council receive a report from staff providing information on planned improvements to Hastings Street, Woolgoolga, in particular highlighting the areas where improved parking outcomes can be provided in that precinct.

2.   Any possible funding options presented in that report."

This report will consider the above and provide guidance to Council on any future plans that Council may have regarding the street and any parking provisions on this street and also where improvements can be provided.

Background

Overview of the Area.

 

Hastings Street Woolgoolga is a mixture of sections of kerb and gutter with bitumen pavement, and areas that are bitumen pavement with gravel or grassed edges. Trunk drainage exists at the low point of the street, but little formalised street drainage is available. The area adjacent to River Street has full road construction. The area immediately west of Scarborough Street has full width construction with kerb and gutter on one side. The section to the east of Scarborough has no kerb and gutter, but does have gravel or grassed parking areas on each side.

 

Hastings Street is intersected by Scarborough Street which has full pavement and kerb and gutter construction. 

 

Community Activities and Use

 

There are a number of community facilities located on or very near Hasting Street which, while they do not all operate concurrently, add to the parking challenges. These are:

-     Woolgoolga Public School (Scarborough Street)

-     First Sikh Temple (Hasting Street, west)

-     St Francis Xavier Catholic Church (Scarborough Street)

-     Northern Beaches Anglican Church (Scarborough Street)

-     Commercial area at western end of Hastings Street adjacent River Street

-     New Sikh Temple with internal parking (Hastings Street, west)

-     Anand Isher Punjabi School (Hastings Street, west)

-     Scout Hall (Hasting Street, east).

 

 

Masterplan Intention

 

The road is classed as a local road under the Draft Road Hierarchy 2008 which enables higher provision of parking / accessibility.

 

The road is classed as a ‘living street’ in the recently adopted Woolgoolga Masterplan which allows for parallel parking on both sides of the street.

 

Current Parking Situation

 

Hasting Street west of Scarborough Street has sections of road that do not have kerb and gutter constructed. However, the shape of the roadway does not preclude parallel parking, albeit somewhat primitive. While the provision of additional kerb and gutter will formalise parking, it is only likely to provide an additional two or three spots in that area.

 

 

 

Hasting Street, east of Scarborough Street does not have any kerb and gutter, however the road reserve is quite wide and the area allows for uniformalised 90 degree parking for up to 18 cars. This is possible in a haphazard manner, where some vehicles park at 90 degrees and some may park parallel, therefore reducing the yield.

 

 

 

Scarborough Street is fully constructed with kerb and gutter, and allows parallel parking on both sides.

 

Private Development Road Upgrade

 

Currently, there is development taking place in Lot 2 and 3 (No 6 Hastings Street), which is required to construct half pavement and kerb and gutter. The completion of this will enable additional formalised parking.

 

Possible Parking Upgrades

 

West of Scarborough Street:

 

It would be possible to construct kerb and gutter to link the existing infrastructure from the existing kerb and gutter at River Street to the existing kerb and gutter at Scarborough Street. As stated previously this would possibly yield two or three additional spaces, although it would provide formal parking rather than the more primitive arrangements that currently exist. This construction would include additional kerb and gutter, removal and reconstruction of existing kerb and gutter (to meet Masterplan criteria), complete road reconstruction to ensure adequate crossfalls, and drainage works. While a concept design has not been undertaken at this stage, this work is expected to cost in the range of $650,000.

 

East of Scarborough Street:

 

The informal parking that exists can be constructed and line marked to ensure maximum use of 90 degree parking. As the road reserve is quite wide, this could occur on both sides of the road. This would yield up to 25 formalised car spaces. The estimated cost of this work is in the range of $375,000.

 

 

Funding Options:

 

Road renewals and upgrades (such as has been requested for Hasting Street) are currently funded by general revenue (SRV) and from an annual Roads to Recovery (R2R) Grant from the RMS. The quantum of these funds is currently in the order of $3.2M per annum, however the R2R program is scheduled to end, and there has been no indication from the RMS regarding a replacement funding program beyond this financial year.

 

Asset management planning for the existing LGA road network has already resulted in the allocation of all road renewal funding for the next two years on road projects across the LGA which are assessed as in greater need than Hastings Street. This result is premised on a technical assessment that the priority roads (not including Hastings Street) cannot continue their current level of service to the community without renewal. If these projects are not undertaken as scheduled the roads involved are at risk of failure and will incur higher maintenance costs until they are renewed.

 

There are no known grant opportunities that would be successful for the Hastings Street project(s).

 

Under the currently adopted scenario Council will expend a total of $1.6m of its $3.2m Road Renewal budget in the Woolgoolga area this financial year. This expenditure will be consumed in the main by upgrade works in both Wharf and Waterloo Streets. Council could consider reprioritising these projects in favour of Hastings Street if Council was to assess that a Hastings Street upgrade was more imminently required.

Issues:

As part of Council’s ‘Fit for the Future’ sustainability initiatives, Council’s policy is that road pavements should be maintained and renewed to ensure lowest whole of life cost whilst still maintaining current levels of service. To ensure this, the road renewals and upgrades projects are selected on an assessment of the road’s condition, the road’s residual life, risk and level of service. Currently the pavement of Hastings Street is evaluated as being in ‘good condition’ and not in need of renewal within the next four years.

 

If the parking upgrade works were to be undertaken in Hastings Street, it would be a change to the level of service provided. Funding would need to be redirected from other road projects that would otherwise be renewed or rehabilitated.

Options:

There are three primary options available:

1.       Note the report and have the upgrade of Hastings Street be evaluated on the pavement renewal program in the next four year renewal cycle.

2.       Resolve to have one or both parking projects nominated in this report included in the 2019/20 Operational Plan. This would result in pavement renewals to the value of the project(s) being delayed until future years.

3.       Resolve to have one or both parking projects nominated in this report included in the current 2018/19 Operational Plan. This would disrupt the current program of works that has been designed, costed and scheduled. This would also result in pavement renewals to the value of the project(s) to be delayed until future years.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Possible parking locations suggested in this report are subject to environmental assessment, which would require assessment of risks and control measures to determine possible outcomes.

•     Social

This street is recognised as a ‘living street’ with significant community benefit due to the large variety of community facilities present. Additional formalised parking would certainly be of social benefit.

•     Civic Leadership

Council is responsible for the operation and maintenance of local roads such as Hastings Street. Any upgrade would be in line with Community Strategic Plan objectives and the Woolgoolga Masterplan.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

There are numerous new assets proposed in the parking projects. While these will need to be maintained and depreciated over time, it is not expected to be a major financial burden to Council.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The upgrade of Hastings Street has not been included in the current Operational Plan, or the two-year Road Renewal Program. Inclusion of Hasting Street upgrade works would necessitate the omission of other projects currently included in the road program. Any work that is classified as “upgrade” as opposed to “renewal”, rather than renewing the existing pavement, will be detrimental to Council’s ‘Fit for the Future’ financial ratios.

 

The cost of the two sub-projects is as follows:

 

Segment

Informal Parking

Additional Parking

Project Cost

Hastings (West)

Available in varying quality

3 parallel, but all formalised. Private upgrade formalised

$650,000

Hastings (East)

Up to 18 spots, but primitive

7 x 90degres but all formalised

$375,000

Total Hasting Street Upgrade

$1,025,000

Risk Analysis:

Risks associated with lack of formal parking include, but are not limited to the following:

-     Injury through traversing uneven ground

-     Congestion leading to delays

-     Poor street amenity.

 

These risks would be managed by the projects mentioned in this report, which would provide formalised parking in the area. Any design or construction risks would be addressed by normal project management procedures.

Consultation:

Several Community groups have approached Council recently, advocating for an upgrade to Hastings Street, these include:

·    Woolgoolga Public School

·    At Augustine’s Catholic Parish

·    Northern Beaches Residents Association Inc

·    First Sikh Temple

 

Internal consultation has occurred between project managers/maintenance staff and consideration of existing issues.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Current road upgrade policies are to allocate funding to minimise pavement asset whole of life costs, and maintain current levels of service. Upgrade roadworks are usually undertaken in conjunction with the need to renew pavements, such has been the case in Fiddaman Road and Diamond Head Drive.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Dependent on the resolution

Conclusion:

While there is parking available in the Hastings Street area, it is primitive and has some risk. Upgrade works would add parking opportunities by formalising parking areas. Current development on Hastings Street will give rise to additional formalised parallel car spaces. Any funding of road upgrade/parking projects in Hastings Street would necessitate the reallocation of previously prioritised projects.