Coffs Harbour City Council

03 May 2017

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

The above meeting will be held in the Council Administration Building

Cnr Coff and Castle Streets, Coffs Harbour on:

 

Thursday, 11 May 2017

 

The meeting commences at 5.00pm and your attendance is requested.

 

 

AGENDA

 

1.         Opening of Ordinary Meeting

2.         Acknowledgment of Country

3.         Disclosure of Interest

4.         Apologies

5.         Public Addresses / Public Forum

6.         Mayoral Minute

7.         Mayoral Actions under Delegated Authority

8.         Confirmation of Minutes

9.         Rescission Motion

10.      Notices of Motion - General

11.      General Manager’s Reports

12.      Notices of Motion – Business Services

13.      Directorate Reports – Business Services

14.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Communities

15.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Communities

16.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Infrastructure

17.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Infrastructure

18.      Trust Reports

19.      Requests for Leave of Absence

20.      Questions On Notice

21.      Matters of an Urgent Nature

22.      Consideration of Confidential Items (if any)

23.      Close of Ordinary Meeting.

 

 

Mick Raby

Acting General Manager

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               11 May 2017

Order of Business  

Directorate Reports - Business Services

BS17/13          Bank and Investment Balances for March 2017.................................... 4

Directorate Reports - Sustainable Communities

SC17/21          Cultural Facility Development - Library and Gallery Scope and Precinct Analysis.............................................................................................. 15

SC17/22          Draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan................................... 15

SC17/23          Coffs Harbour Public Realm Strategy Project Plan.................... 15

Directorate Reports - Sustainable Infrastructure

SI17/10           Traffic Committee No. 2/2017......................................................................... 15

Trust Reports

T17/10             TRUST REPORT - Relocation of Marine Rescue Woolgoolga to Arrawarra Headland Facility - Progress Report........................... 15   


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               11 May 2017

BS17/13       Bank and Investment Balances for March 2017

Author:                        Section Leader Financial Planning

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

Coffs Harbour 2030:   LC3 We have strong civic leadership and governance

Attachments:              ATT1  BS17/13   Monthly Investment Report for the month ended 31 March 2017  

 

Executive Summary

The purpose is to report on Council’s Bank Balances and Investments as at 31 March 2017.  Council receives independent advice and invests surplus funds in accordance with Councils Investment Policy to maximise investment income and preserve capital to assist with funding requirements for projects listed under the Coffs Harbour 2030 Community Strategic Plan.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council note the bank balances and investments totalling $183,551,777.33 (including from loans, Developer Contributions and other avenues that form the restricted accounts and are committed for future works) as at 31 March 2017.

 

 

Report

Description of Item:

A copy of the state of Bank Balances and Investments as at 31 March 2017 is attached.

 

It should be noted that Council is required to account for investments in accordance with the Australian International Financial Reporting Standards.  Term deposits are shown at face value and all other investment balances at the end of each month reflect market value movements which would be inclusive of accrued interest.

 

Interest when paid, say quarterly, would result in reductions in the market value of the investments.  The Investment Report reflects the above requirements and reflects the interest earned (or accrued) on each investment, based on the acquisition price.

 

Reports written by Laminar Group Pty Ltd (Council’s investment portfolio advisors), which examine economic and financial markets data for March 2017 are available in the Councilors’ Resource Centre.

Issues:

There are no issues associated with the report.

Options:

As the report is for noting only, an options analysis is not required.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no perceived current or future environmental impacts.

•     Social

There are no perceived current or future social impacts.

•     Civic Leadership

Council invests surplus funds to maximise investment income and preserve capital to assist with funding requirements for projects listed under the Coffs Harbour 2030 Community Strategic Plan.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Council’s investments are held according to ther requirements stated within Council’s investments policy and the returns are acceptable in relation thereto. In the long term earnings from investments can vary due to econcomic conditions and financial markets.  Council constructs its investment portfolio with consideration of current conditions and to comply with the Office of Local Government (OLG) investment policy guidelines.

•     Economic – Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

As at 31 March 2017 it is noted that the total bank and investment balances total $183,551,777.33, comprising restricted and unrestricted General, Trust, Water and Sewerage Fund cash and investments.

Risk Analysis:

The likelihood of risks associated with New South Wales Local Government’s investing funds is now remote due to the conservative nature of investments permitted under statutory requirements.  The risk of capital not being returned in relation to each individual investment Council owns is indicated in the attachment.

 

The main risks for Council’s investment portfolio are liquidity and credit risk, both of which are being managed under the advice of Laminar Group Pty Ltd.  Liquidity risk is the risk that the investor is unable to redeem the investment at a fair price within a timely period and thereby incurs additional costs (or in the worst case is unable to execute its spending plans).  Credit risk is the risk of loss of principal stemming from a financial institutions failure to repay that principal when that principal is due.  Investors are compensated for assuming credit risk by way of interest payments from the financial institutions issuing the investment security.

 

Credit risk is rated by various rating agencies.  Investment securities in Council’s current portfolio are rated by either Standard and Poors or Fitch, with the majority of the portfolio rated by Standard and Poors.  Standard and Poors credit ratings and an explanation of their ratings are as follows:

 

Rating

Ratings Explanation

AAA

Extremely strong capacity to meet financial commitments. Highest Rating.

AA

Very strong capacity to meet financial commitments.

A

Strong capacity to meet financial commitments, but somewhat susceptible to adverse economic conditions and changes in circumstances.

BBB

Adequate capacity to meet financial commitments, but more subject to adverse economic conditions.

BBB-

Considered lowest investment grade by market participants.

BB+

Considered highest speculative grade by market participants.

BB

Less vulnerable in the near term but faces major ongoing uncertainties to adverse business, financial and economic conditions.

B

More vulnerable to adverse business, financial and economic conditions but currently has the capacity to meet financial commitments.

CCC

Currently vulnerable and dependent on favorable business, financial and economic conditions to meet financial commitments.

CC

Currently highly vulnerable.

C

Currently highly vulnerable obligations and other defined circumstances.

D

Payment default on financial commitments.

 

Ratings from ‘AA’ to ‘CCC’ may be modified by the addition of a plus (+) or minus (-) sign to show relative standing within the major rating categories.

 

Types of investment securities by credit risk ranking from highest to lowest are as follows:

 

·    Deposits/Covered Bonds – these share first ranking

·    Senior debt – Floating Rate Notes/Fixed Coupon Bonds.

·    Subordinated debt

·    Hybrids

·    Preference shares

·    Equity shares (common shares).

 

Subordinated debt, hybrids, preference and equity shares are not a permitted investment under the current Ministerial Order.  Term deposits of $250,000 or less per financial institution are covered under the Commonwealth Government Deposit Guarantee Scheme and therefore by default have the same credit rating as the Commonwealth Government, ie AAA.

 

All credit unions, building societies and mutual banks are Authorised Deposit-taking Institutions (ADI’s) and are regulated in the same way as all other Australian banks.  ADI’s are regulated by the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC) under the Corporations Act 2001, and by the Australian Prudential Regulatory Authority (APRA) under the Banking Act 1959.

Consultation:

Council’s investment advisors, Laminar Group Pty Ltd have been consulted in the preparation of this report.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Council funds have been invested in accordance with Council’s Investment Policy (POL‑049), which was adopted on 27 November 2014.

Local Government Act 1993 – Section 625

Local Government Act 1993 – Investment Order (dated 12 January 2011)

Local Government General Regulation 2005

The Trustee Amendment (Discretionary Investments) Act 1997 – Sections 14A(2), 14C(1) and 14C(2)

Implementation Date / Priority:

Nil.

Conclusion:

Council should consider the information provided in the report and the Councillors’ Resource Centre and the recommendation provided.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                                          11 May 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               11 May 2017

SC17/21       Cultural Facility Development - Library and Gallery Scope and Precinct Analysis

Author:                        Group Leader Community & Cultural Services

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

Coffs Harbour 2030:   LP3 Our city centre is a place where people can live, work and play

Attachments:              ATT1  SC17/21   Coffs Harbour City Council Utilisation Study

ATT2  SC17/21   Library and Gallery Precinct Analysis

ATT3  SC17/21   Community Conversations About New CHCC Regional Gallery and City Library - August 2016

ATT4  SC17/21   CONFIDENTIAL          Council Costing Schedule and Comparative Analysis

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(d)(ii) of the Local Government Act as it contains information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the council.  

 

Executive Summary

In consultation with the community, Council has progressed ideas and options to build a new Regional Gallery and central Library.  This proposed facility development aligns with the objectives and desired outcomes of Council’s adopted City Centre Masterplan 2031, Creative Coffs – Cultural Strategic Plan 2017-2022 and the Coffs Harbour City Library Strategic Plan 2012-2016.

This Council report presents recommendations from the Precinct Analysis for the Library/Gallery project mixed and the additional civic use investigations for the 23-31 Gordon Street site as resolved by Council in June 2016. 

These recommendations include confirming a Cultural and Civic Precinct in the CBD and adopting a scope for the Cultural and Civic space project to include a new central library, regional gallery, customer service, Council Chambers and Council staff office accommodation.

These recommendations have been based on community consultation, additional analysis by the project team and advice from the Library Gallery Planning Advisory Group and City Centre Masterplan Committee.

By confirming the scope and project resources for the proposed Cultural and Civic Space project on 23-31 Gordon Street the next steps in the planning processes can proceed.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Endorses the project to be named Cultural and Civic Space – For the Heart of the City.

2.       Adopts the scope of the Cultural and Civic Space project to include a new central library, regional gallery, customer service area, Council Chambers and Council staff office accommodation.

3.       Notes that the Regional Museum asset, and other Council assets, will be considered within the asset consolidation and business case planning exercise.

4.       Adopts the Library/Gallery Precinct Analysis (Attachment 2) and updates the City Centre Masterplan accordingly.

5.       Notes that $160,000 for project management and updates to both the Regional Gallery and Library Service Strategic Plans will be considered by Council for the final 2017-2021 Delivery Program and final 2017/18 Operational Plan.

 

Report

Description of Item:

This Council report presents the analysis for the precinct and development scope based on community consultation, additional analysis and advice from the Library Gallery Planning Advisory Group (LGPAG).

By confirming the scope for the project on Gordon Street, the next step in the design process can proceed.

Issues:

In consultation with the community, Council has progressed ideas and options to build a new regional gallery and central Library.  This proposed facility development aligns with the objectives and desired outcomes of Council’s adopted City Centre Masterplan 2031, Creative Coffs – Cultural Strategic Plan 2017-2022 and the Coffs Harbour City Library Strategic Plan 2012-2016.

Both the regional gallery and central library are far too small to provide an acceptable level of service to our community and visitors, despite the excellence of the staff who operate them.

At its meeting of 26 November 2015, Council resolved to commence detailed facility research and concept planning for an expanded Harry Bailey Memorial Library and Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery facilities as follows:

 

1.   That Council commence detailed facility research and concept planning for an expanded Harry Bailey Memorial Library and Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery facilities including:

1.1  Development of functional specifications to meet future facility and population needs;

1.2  Assessment of CBD sites and co-location options;

1.3  Preparation of an overall concept and elevation plans;

1.4  Concept estimate to include costs relating to the site, construction, fit out, landscaping, civil works and professional fees;

1.5  On-going and full lifecycle costing;

1.6  Funding options and recommended strategy; and

1.7  Community and staff engagement.

In the first half of 2016, the LGPAG and Council project team undertook an assessment of eleven sites for a new central library and regional gallery in the central business district (CBD).  A site analysis was undertaken of the top three ranked sites via selection criteria, site visits and advice from professional staff.  The LGPAG and Council project team identified the opportunity to further investigate other mixed use and civic development in additional to a library and gallery to match the needs of our growing population and to add value to the city as an urban renewal opportunity and a cultural, community, business and visitor destination.

At its meeting of 23 June 2016, it was resolved that Council:

1.   Endorses 23-31 Gordon Street as the site for a new Harry Bailey Memorial Library and the new Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery.

2.   Undertake a precinct analysis that includes identifying activation opportunities and pedestrian access to and surrounding the 23-31 Gordon Street site.

3.   Investigate mixed use and civic (includes Council office accommodation) development in addition to a new central library and regional gallery on the 23-31 Gordon Street site, in order to maximise urban renewal and activation outcomes consistent with the CBD Masterplan.

4.   Considers a future report which details the precinct analysis, mixed use and civic investigation and any corresponding impact on the scope, budget and timing of the library and gallery project.

The following initiatives and planning have been undertaken in 2016/17 to date:

ü Development of the Library/Gallery (Cultural and Civic Space) Precinct Analysis

ü Analysis and options review for mixed use and civic investigations

ü Initial feasibility (financial) assessments for site options/uses

ü Community and stakeholder consultations (broad and targeted)

ü Feedback and endorsement from the LGPAG and City Centre Masterplan Committees

ü Cultural facility comparative research with other regional cultural facilities

ü Facility requirements documented for architectural/concept brief for library and gallery components

ü Council office accommodation utilisation study and analysis

Library/Gallery Project – Community and Stakeholder Consultation

Over July and August 2016, 219 members of the community gave their views through three types of engagement as detailed in Attachment 3.

Community Conversations

A wide array of people from the Coffs Harbour community participated in the “Community Conversations”, including: artists, teachers, librarians, library users, gallery volunteers, business operators and Year 8 high school students. Nine conversations, each of two hours, were conducted, involving approximately 72 people – with an average of eight at each session.

Written submissions

Display stands were placed in Council facilities including the libraries, the Jetty Memorial Theatre, the Regional Art Gallery and Council Chambers. The stands had standard forms and boxes to receive community comments on the proposed new central library and regional gallery.  Council received 136 written submissions through this process.  Of these 7 submissions felt there was not a need for a new regional gallery or library development and 11 submissions that gave strong support for a cultural precinct and collocated cultural facility development but disagree with the City Centre Masterplan and 2016 site selection of 23-31 Gordon Street and state that all cultural facilities should be sited on City Hill.

Online forum

An online forum was used to gather 13 submissions from 11 participants.

Other engagement feedback

In addition to the above, the survey for Creative Coffs - Cultural Strategic Plan (857 responses), upgraded facilities for a visual art gallery received 51.9% support and library upgrade 44.6% support from respondents.

Significant consultation also occurred through the development of the new Community Strategic Plan - MyCoffs – mycoffs.org and the Creative Coffs – Cultural Strategic Plan 2017-2022.

Through the above consultations, the clear need and support for a cultural and civic precinct in the CBD and increased space for cultural infrastructure and programming has been identified by the community. 

Key Findings

There was considerable agreement across all forms of engagement on a number of important requirements:

·    Strong support for a cultural precinct and enhanced cultural facilities within the LGA, in particular in the CBD and urban centres.

·    Feedback around the need for a civic heart and numerous comments about the lack of ‘town hall or civic centre’.

·    The need for high quality building design that includes:

-      An open, inviting frontage and welcoming layout which draws people into the building

-      Public art and sculpture outside and in vicinity

-      Aboriginal elements in the design, inside and out

-      A high-quality café onsite

·    Shared spaces that include:

-      Spaces, including one for up to 200 people, for meetings, seminars, training and events such as writer’s or artist’s talks or small concerts

-      Technology resources including audio-visual facilities such as a recording studio

-      Spaces available for micro and transient business operators

-      Excellent access for people with disabilities and older people

-      Potential as a tourist attraction

·    Library spaces that include:

-      An excellent, possibly soundproof, children’s area which is welcoming, in particular to young parents or carers

-      Quiet, well-lit or natural light reading areas

-      Study areas – for groups, tutorials, individuals and HSC students

-      Youth gathering space/alcove with lots of colour and beanbags

·    Gallery spaces that include:

-      More exhibition spaces, able to re-configured to suit requirements such as displaying sculpture

-      Workshop spaces for arts and crafts education

-      Touring exhibitions on the ground floor to encourage visits

There was very strong commentary about the importance of these facilities to youth. Community members commented:

Getting young ones into regular library visits and establishing a ‘borrowing habit’ is crucial to supporting literacy skills in our children. To do this we need to support the mums and dads and let them feel confident coming to the library.”

Galleries are essential in assisting young people in developing their visual and conceptual intelligence and libraries develop imagination, understanding of language and ability to see beyond the obvious.”

In summary, the participants in the community engagement saw high value in new, larger, more versatile and more attractive facilities for themselves, for visitors and businesses, and the community more broadly.

Precinct Analysis

A detailed and comprehensive precinct analysis was undertaken with the input of and endorsement of the project team, LGPAG and the City Centre Masterplan Committee.  The precinct analysis has been completed in order to identify activation opportunities, pedestrian legibility for CBD activity nodes (to and from key adjoining areas such as the Castle Street carpark) and opportunities for rear land activation.

The Precinct Analysis as detailed in Attachment 2 identifies and recommends a Cultural and Civic Precinct within the CBD, future upgrades to Gordon Street and Riding Lane and various easements to improve pedestrian accessibility to 23-31 Gordon Street.

As can be seen from Attachment 2, the Precinct Analysis has drawn the following key conclusions:

·    The proposed Library/Gallery site is central to key sites and localities in the Coffs Harbour LGA.

·    The site has strong vehicular connections to the wider city via the Pacific Highway, Harbour Drive and Hogbin Drive, however its connectivity with the CBD suffers from poor pedestrian and cycle amenity.

·    There is significant opportunity to enhance complementary civic and cultural land uses on the site and within the precinct.

(Note: The Coffs Harbour City Centre Masterplan 2031 (‘City Centre Masterplan’) points out that entertainment centres, located within, or on the edge, of walkable City Centres, attract significant numbers of people boosting patronage, and hence the viability of, surrounding restaurants, bars and similar uses.)

·    Desired building heights of about eight storeys (28m) for the site and adjoining land provide an opportunity for taller development and would support the colocation of complementary uses such as entertainment facilities, performing art space, public administration buildings and mixed use development.

·    Desired building heights of about twelve storeys (40m) adjoining public green space provides an opportunity for inner city mixed use development (office/living) in walking distance to the proposed Library/Gallery site.

·    The site has been identified within a desired ‘cultural hub’ precinct due to its close proximity to the City Heart; existing complementary civic services in the locality; proximity to large expanses of public green space; strong pedestrian and vehicular connectivity; and proximity to desired city living growth, all of which provide an ideal setting for cultural and civic facilities.

(Note: the findings of the City Centre Masterplan reaffirm the location of the desired cultural hub precinct by expressing a preference to locate cultural community assets as close to the city heart as possible.)

The Library/Gallery Precinct Analysis and recommendations have been endorsed by the LGPAG and City Centre Masterplan Committee.

Mixed Use and Civic Investigation (Including Council Office Accommodation)

The project team and LGPAG considered various mixed use options complementary to the library and gallery facility.  Council has actively investigated what complementary developments could happen on the site along with the library and gallery, to make the most of such an important location

In considering other mixed and civic uses for the site, the following assumptions were made for the purposes of the analysis and initial feasibility analysis:

·    The library and gallery component includes minimum 4,100sqm.

·    The library and gallery component to include space for co-working/meeting space/programming/maker spaces/studios/café/related retail.

·    The Library Gallery Precinct Analysis plan is adopted by Council, the City Centre Masterplan is updated and the Gordon Street and Riding Lane improvements are funded.

·    A performing arts space is not considered within this development as this is part of a parallel feasibility and expression of interest process.

·    Collection and corporate records storage to be relocated off site.

·    Council’s leadership preference is to locate all administrative staff into a single location.

·    Further operational, business case, concepts and more detailed feasibility will occur after scope has been finalised by Council.

Options Considered for the Cultural and Civic Precinct

The project team and LGPAG considered various mixed uses including commercial and residential options for the Gordon Street site and the associated requirements and impacts on existing Council assets including Rigby House and Council’s Administration building.

A high level financial feasibility was undertaken and as a result three options furthered for more detailed review.

The three options investigated all include the following functions:

·    New central library and regional gallery.

·    Council’s customer service function.

·    Council’s civic Council Chambers meeting space.

Two of the three options further add either an EOI process for built to order office and/or space for complementary tenants such as Government services, education providers, cultural organisations etc or the full Council staff office space requirements.

The table below provides a summary of the final three options considered and estimated costs for the capital infrastructure development or upgrades. Further costing and analysis of potential asset sales/consolidation can proceed once the project scope has been finalised. 

In addition, as a result of the asset consolidation initial review as part of the mixed and civic use investigation, it is also recommended that Council  analyse the opportunity of consolidating the Regional Museum exhibition space into the new development as part of the detailed feasibility and business case.

The project team and LGPAG have endorsed Option 3 as a recommendation for Council’s consideration to progress to concept, feasibility and business case. 

This recommendation supports the long term strategic objectives and aspirations of the City Centre Masterplan and Council’s organisational and operational requirements.

Mixed and Civic Use Investigation

23-31 Gordon Street Development Summary

Council office accommodation

Council asset consolidation opportunities

Option 1

Library, Gallery, Front Counter/Customer Service and Council Chambers (multipurpose space)

Capital cost estimated approximately $18m

Refurbish existing Council administration building

Upgrade cost approximately $2.7m

Sell (or rent) Rigby House

(Estimated income see Confidential Attachment 4) 

Option 2

Library, Gallery, Front Counter/Customer Service and Council Chambers (multipurpose space)

Built to order office accommodation (3,200m2 approximately) for complementary mixed use tenants to activate site.

Capital cost estimated approximately $35m

Refurbish existing Council administration building

 

 

 

Upgrade cost approximately $2.7m

Sell (or rent) Rigby House

(Estimated income see Confidential Attachment 4) 

Option 3

Library, Gallery, Customer Service and Council Chambers (multipurpose space) and Council staff office accommodation (3,200m2 approx.).

 

Capital cost estimated approximately $35m

Council administrative staff (currently in Rigby House and Administration building) moves to 23-31 Gordon Street

Estimated costs for move (Attachment 4)

Sell (or rent) Rigby House and Council Administrative building.

(Estimated income see Confidential Attachment 4)

Further recommendations for, business case and detailed feasibility

That the existing Regional Museum exhibition space be reviewed for possible inclusion in the development.

Council Office Accommodation Analysis and Requirements

As part of the Council’s continuous improvement program, ways of improving productivity and streamlining costs have been considered right across the organisation. In 2016, it was identified that ad hoc refurbishments that could be undertaken as part of the organisational change process would not see the most effective consideration of the organisation's accommodation requirements. To properly consider current office accommodation working arrangements external consultants, Davenport Campbell and Associates, were engaged to consider what would be the office accommodation requirements of the organisation until 2030, if it was possible that these office accommodation requirements could be met within the current footprint of both Rigby House and the Administration buildings individually and if this space could be optimised with different working methods.

There are three main workstyles that are currently utilised in commercial office space. Firstly, the current static working model, which is employed by Council in its current facilities does not utilise space efficiently. Secondly, a Hybrid workstyle workplace which consists of the following elements:

·    Various workstation types consisting of a mix of dedicated fixed and agile workpoints (typically 50/50, however dependent on requirements).

·    Some dedicated enclosed rooms.

·    High level of collaborative settings.

·    Lockers in neighbourhood.

·    Mobility supported by technology.

·    Perimeter free of high walls to ensure all enjoy natural light and views.

·    Activity Based worksettings (Collaborative, Process, Focus).

·    Mid - High utilisation of space.

The third workstyle is that of activity based working which consists of the following elements:

·    Various workstation types (agile workpoints).

·    No dedicated enclosed rooms.

·    High level of collaborative settings.

·    Lockers in neighbourhood.

·    Mobility supported by technology.

·    Perimeter free of high walls to ensure all enjoy natural light and views.

·    Activity Based worksettings (Collaborative, Process, Focus, Share).

·    High utilisation of space.

It is likely that should Council either construct new office facilities or refurbish current facilities, the most likely workstyle to be employed by Council would be the Hybrid workstyle to allow better utilisation of the office space.

The report presented by Davenport Campbell and Associates (Attachment 1) concluded that the both of the current Council office buildings (Rigby House and Admin building) are constrained by limitations and that the inclusion of Council office space within the new Gallery and Library complex at 21-31 Gordon Street would provide the best long term solution for Council.

Project Naming

The Project has to date been called the “Library and Gallery Project”.  The proposed development for 23-31 Gordon Street is within the proposed Cultural and Civic Precinct as outlined in the Library/Gallery Precinct Analysis.  All three options considered contain Civic elements to the development being Customer Service and Council Chambers.  It is therefore recommended that the project be renamed (as endorsed by LGPAG) to the Cultural and Civic Space project with the tagline “for the Heart of the City”. 

Options:

1.   Adopt the recommendation provided to Council noting the next steps and resources required to progress further planning for the 23-31 Gordon Street development and renaming of the project

2.   Amend the recommendation provided to Council to reflect the other options provided.

3.   Reject or amend the recommendation provided to Council.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Given that the scale of building and services required for this project is as yet undefined, it is not possible to assess full environmental impacts at this stage.

•     Social

Both the existing central library and regional gallery provide clear social, economic and cultural benefits and outcomes to the community. The planned expansion of facilities enables these social, economic and cultural outcomes to continue with an increasing and diverse population and addresses areas of need clearly identified in both existing library and cultural strategic plans.

•     Civic Leadership

Civic leadership is shown through the on-going implementation of the Coffs Harbour 2030 Plan which includes the following objectives:

-      LP 3 Our city centre is a place where people can live, work and play.

Specific strategies addressed by this project include:

-      LP 1.2 Promote the Local Government area as a lifestyle location for e-workers.

-      LP 3.2 Develop the city centre as a social and cultural focus for Coffs Harbour.

-      LP 5.1 Promote and support a culture of lifelong learning.

-      LC 1.1 Build pride and identity in Coffs Harbour as a community and a place.

-      LC 1.6 Promote opportunities for all to fulfil their potential.

-      LC 4.1 Support local artistic and cultural expression.

-      LC 4.2 Support opportunities for artistic and cultural growth and enjoyment

Council sees an opportunity to match the needs of our growing population, civic leadership and to add value to the city as an urban renewal opportunity and a cultural, community, business and visitor destination.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Should the project proceed to the construction phase, it will have a positive impact on construction employment in Coffs Harbour and assists the City Centre Masterplan and the 2030 Community Strategic Plan outcomes. An enhanced library and gallery facility is likely to have a positive benefit in cultural tourism visitation and expenditure in the locale as evidenced by other similar cultural facilities in regional areas.

Economic Benefits Flowing from the Project

Research for the development of cultural facilities elsewhere suggests that the economic benefits of the project will largely fall into the following key areas:

1.   Job Generation – jobs from construction as well as through construction multiplier effects and the operation of any new retail, commercial, civic and cultural facilities.

2.   Output Benefits – the operational phase will generate additional output through the employment generated on-site in new facilities.

3.   Construction Related Benefits - construction related investment would be created through the development of proposed buildings and facilities within Coffs Harbour CBD.

4.   Production And Consumption Induced Construction Multiplier Benefits – these benefits would in part be secured by communities and businesses of the broader region that provide inputs (i.e. goods and services) into the construction process.

5.   Retail Expenditure – additional expenditure would be generated for the benefit of local businesses as a result of spend from:

-      Centralised CBD workers and in the future potentially more residents;

-      Visitors; and

-      Construction workers.

The proximity of the site to existing CBD businesses allows the maximum capture of this spend.

6.   Visitor Related Expenditure – in addition to retail expenditure, even a modest increase in visitors staying in Coffs Harbour can generate a notable economic benefit.

7.   Visitor Multiplier Benefits - applying multiplier effects to the visitor expenditure above could see the wider economy benefit further than just those sectors where visitors directly spend their money.

The actual economic benefits are difficult to estimate while the scope, business case and feasibility of the project is not finalised but the experience of other regional cities can provide some guidance of the benefits of cultural facilities:

-      The year the old Albury Art Gallery closed, there were 25,000 visits. The new Gallery MAMA opened on the 2nd October 2015 and in the subsequent year had over 50,000 visitors being an additional 25,000 visitors to the immediate precinct with a positive effect on all of the types of benefit outlined above.

-      The State Library of NSW report, Enriching Communities, provides evidence of the contribution and value of NSW public libraries. In particular, the study also found that public libraries contribute positively in terms of economic value, benefit and activity. NSW public libraries generate at least $4.24 of economic value for each dollar expended, and $2.82 of economic activity for each dollar expended. It is worth noting that the methodology used did not consider intangible factors or indirect benefits, and is therefore conservative in its estimates.

-      Sometimes a facility, in this case the Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) in Hobart has an enormous effect on the economy of a regional area. In the year ending December 2016, (Tasmanian Visitor Survey) Tasmania received 1 236 400 visitors. Of this number, 27 per cent (338 358) indicated that they went to MONA. From the day of its opening, MONA became the second most visited tourism attraction in Tasmania. In 2016, visitors to the state who went to MONA spent a total of $760 million during their trip to the state ($327 million on accommodation, $124 million on transport and $308 million on other items), a 2.5 per cent increase from the previous year.

-      In 2014, a coalition of NSW regional LGAs known as Evocities (i.e. Albury City Council, Armidale Dumaresq Council, Bathurst Regional Council, Dubbo City Council, Orange City Council, Tamworth Regional Council and Wagga Wagga City Council) researched the economic contribution of the 26 cultural facilities in their areas. The report examined the economic impact of the operation of the facilities, capital expenditure related to the facilities, induced expenditure of non-local (tourist) visitation and the return on investment for the facilities.  It also examined the impact of employment and volunteering at the facilities, on the local and regional economies. Although libraries and the number of social benefits such as community cohesion, sense of identity, health and improved educational outcomes were beyond the scope of the study and therefore were not included in this research, when flow on effects are taken into account, the 26 cultural facilities generated:

§ 0.24% of the combined LGAs’ gross regional product and 0.24% of regional household income

§ An additional 8.5 full time equivalent positions for every 10 fulltime equivalent positions at the facilities.

§ An average return on investment by Local, State and Federal government of 69%.

Given the similarity of the individual Evocities to other regional cities in NSW, it would be reasonable to conclude that other cultural facilities also have a positive effect on their local and regional economies in terms of employment, visitation and contribution to gross regional product.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The Draft Delivery Program Key Areas of Focus 2017-2021 notes:

Design and construct a new Cultural and Civic Space (including a new central Library and Regional Gallery) noting that the projected delivery of this project is provisional depending on the determination of Council and the future availability of funding.

The following initial working Delivery Program 2017/21 budget items that were identified and estimated pending the outcome of this Council report include:

-      Project Manager to co-ordinate the detailed planning for the Cultural and Civic Space project - $120,000

Update the service plans for both the Regional Gallery and Library to take account of the expanded facility and new location:

-      Develop and implement a Regional Gallery Service Strategic Plan - $15,000

-      Review and update the Library Service Strategic Plan 2012-2016 - $25,000

Capital Costs

Full costing, business case and operational costs for the proposed Cultural and Civic Space project concept planning can fully commence after the final scope has been established.

Estimates on three options have been included in this report and range from $18-35m. These figures are separate to the income from any asset divestment or rentals upgrade and Council administrative office move or upgrade costs.  It should be noted that it would cost $2.7m for an upgrade of the existing administration building.

Identification of funding sources and a fundraising strategy will be included in the final feasibility report.

Recurrent Costs

Future operational and staffing costs and asset lifecycle costing for any proposed facility will be assessed as part of this research once the final scope has been established.  This will also include depreciation and interest costs, based on potential loan funding, which are estimated to be in the order of $2m annually.

Risk Analysis:

Additional project risk identification and other risk considerations will be further considered as part of the detailed planning and feasibility.  Should Option 2 including built to order office accommodation for complementary tenants be selected this will increase the project timeline by approximately 6 months.

Consultation:

The LGPAG has provided significant input and advice into this site selection and report. Community engagement commenced with the Library Strategic Plan and Cultural Plan 2013-2016 and the community cultural facilities engagement processes in 2012, 2013 and 2014.  In 2016 extensive consultation was undertaken for both Creative Coffs – Cultural Strategic Plan 2017-2022, MyCoffs – Community Strategic Plan and the Library/Gallery project.

Community and staff stakeholder engagement has been undertaken to input into the draft design brief for the library and gallery components of the project.  Further input from staff and stakeholders will be required for the additional mixed use and civic uses if endorsed by Council.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

-      Creative Coffs - Cultural Policy and Cultural Strategic Plan 2017-2022

-      Coffs Harbour City Library Strategic Plan 2012-2016

-      City Centre Masterplan 2013

-      Coffs Coast Tourism Strategic Plan 2020

Implementation Date / Priority:

Once the scope has been finalised and resources allocated the project can continue with the steps as outlined in November 2015 being:

1.1      Development of functional specifications to meet future facility and population needs;

1.2      Preparation of an overall concept and elevation plans;

1.3      Concept estimate to include costs relating to the site, construction, fit out, landscaping, civil works and professional fees;

1.4      On-going and full lifecycle costing;

1.5      Funding options and recommended strategy;

As indicated in previous Council reports, it is estimated that it will take approximately 3-5 years from final decision to proceed for an infrastructure project of this size to be completed.

Conclusion:

A decision on the scope for the facility development will allow this important community, cultural and civic infrastructure project to move forward.  The next stage will include concepts, financial estimates and feasibility to include on-going and lifecycle costing as well as funding options and recommended strategy.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                                          11 May 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                 11 May 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                 11 May 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               11 May 2017

SC17/22       Draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan

Author:                        Senior Planner / Urban Designer

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

Coffs Harbour 2030:   PL1 Our infrastructure and urban development is designed for sustainable living

Attachments:              ATT1  SC17/22   Draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan 2017 - Part A

ATT2  SC17/22   Draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan 2017 - Part B

ATT3  SC17/22   Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan Traffic and Parking Study 2017  

 

Executive Summary

Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 13 June 2013 adopted a Project Plan to allow the Woolgoolga Town Centre Study 1996 to be reviewed and updated in the form of a Masterplan.

The initial phase of the Masterplan review project was completed in-house in conjunction with consultant advisors. During this initial phase of the project, Council received several requests for the integration of the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan and draft Beach Reserve Plan of Management (PoM) for the southern section of Woolgoolga Beach Reserve which was also being prepared at this time.

Noting that the two projects had different statutory requirements and functions, Council recognised that the resulting plans needed to work in harmony to provide positive outcomes to the Woolgoolga community. On this basis, Council engaged consultants Lat27 to finalise the Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan and to ensure that the outputs within the Masterplan are reflective of community issues raised as part of both the Masterplan and PoM projects.

Extensive consultation has been undertaken for the Masterplan review project including a Community Vision Night, Business Confidence Survey, Online Ideas Map, Peer Review, Holiday Park Access Engagement, Traffic and Parking Workshops/Presentations, and targeted stakeholder engagement.

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement for the exhibition of the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan, prepared by Lat27 (April 2017) provided as Attachments 1 and 2 to this report.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Endorse the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan, prepared by Lat27, dated April 2017 (Attachments 1 and 2) and the Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan Traffic and Parking Study, prepared by MRCagney Pty Ltd, dated April 2017 (Attachment 3).

2.       Resolve to publicly exhibit the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan 2017 (Parts A and B) for a minimum period of 28 days.

3.       Note that a further report will be brought back to Council for consideration following the public exhibition of the draft Masterplan.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Woolgoolga Town Centre Study Review

Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 13 June 2013 adopted a Project Plan to allow the Woolgoolga Town Centre Study 1996 to be reviewed and updated in the form of a Masterplan. At this time it was resolved that:

1.   Coffs Harbour City Council endorse the attached Woolgoolga Town Centre Study Review Project Plan.

2.   Coffs Harbour City Council engage an appropriately qualified consultant to provide economic, strategic planning, and built form advisory services to Council for the project.

3.   Coffs Harbour City Council endorse the attached Consultant Brief Request for Quotation for the Woolgoolga Town Centre Study Review Consultant Advisor.

4.   Review a specific parking plan for Woolgoolga to be incorporated into the Masterplan.

5.   Council continues to lobby NSW Roads and Maritime Services and the Minister for Roads for funds towards development of a Socio-Economic Bypass Action Strategy, to further inform the Woolgoolga Town Centre Study Review.

In accordance with this resolution, Council engaged a consultant advisor for the economic, strategic planning and built form aspects of the project. This engagement included analysis of parking within Woolgoolga.

Council also continued to lobby NSW Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) in accordance with Resolution 5 above, to seek funding to address possible social and economic impacts from the Woolgoolga bypass as part of the Pacific Highway Sapphire to Woolgoolga project. The response from the Government was presented to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 8 May 2014. In summary, the Government was unable to undertake additional economic studies however a subsequent agreement was made with the RMS to fund additional urban design work as part of the Woolgoolga Town Centre Review focusing on the change in role and function of the by-passed section of the Pacific Highway through Woolgoolga.

Following Council’s endorsement of a final town centre masterplan for Woolgoolga, Council will be in a position to follow up this funding from the RMS to implement the urban design strategies proposed for the Solitary Islands Way within the masterplan.

Masterplanning Process - Initial Steps

The initial steps for the masterplanning process for this project involved the creation of the WoolgoolgaWOW website as a portal for information to the community. Three engagement activities were also undertaken as part of the initial phase of the project including a Community Vision Night, Business Confidence Survey and an online Ideas Map. Council staff also facilitated several meetings with the Woolgoolga and Northern Beaches Chamber of Commerce to discuss the project.

The results of the initial community and stakeholder activities were presented to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 8 May 2014. The outcomes of the consultation demonstrated that there was a high degree of business confidence in Woolgoolga as a place to undertake business. The outcomes also reaffirmed the vision for the Woolgoolga Town Centre which was previously stated in the Woolgoolga Township Marketing Action Plan 2011 as “to grow Woolgoolga in a way that does not affect its unspoilt and unhurried beachside character, but that is proactive in supporting business growth”.

At this meeting Council also resolved to give consideration to feedback received during the Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan review project that related to the Woolgoolga Beach Reserve, as part of the public exhibition and consideration of the PoM for the southern section of Woolgoolga Beach Reserve.


 

Peer Review

Based on significant community feedback relating to the connection and overlap between the draft Masterplan and draft PoM, Council engaged consultants Lat27 to undertake an independent peer review to test overall design principles and findings of both projects with the view of providing recommendations for amendments to the draft documents and for finalising outstanding matters contained within the implementation component of the Masterplan. To inform the peer review, consultants Ardill Payne and Partners were also engaged to undertake traffic and parking analysis of the PoM study area and the B2 Local Centre business zone.

A copy of the independent peer review was presented to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 10 December 2015. The peer review identified a number of issues to be resolved within both the PoM and the Masterplan in and around the Beach Street town centre, including a disconnect between the beach and the town centre; limited pedestrian connectivity and priority; and the need to protect the village atmosphere whilst simultaneously promoting the business centre. A key change recommended in the peer review included the relocation of the entrance to the Woolgoolga Beach Holiday Park from Beach Street to Wharf Street.

Based on the issues raised as part of the peer review, Council engaged consultants Lat27 to finalise the Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan and to ensure that the outputs within the plan are reflective of community issues raised as part of both the Masterplan and PoM projects.

Holiday Park Access

In response to the outcomes of the peer review, a recommendation was put forward at Council’s Ordinary Meeting of 10 December 2015 seeking in principle support to relocate the entry to the Woolgoolga Beach Holiday Park from Beach Street to Wharf Street.  At this meeting, Council resolved:

1.   Council acknowledges the Woolgoolga Design Review, prepared by Lat27, dated August 2015 (Attachment 1).

2.   A concept plan displaying the alternative entry point be placed on exhibition.

Accordingly, the concept plan was publicly exhibited with the outcomes of the public exhibition reported to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 14 April 2016. At this meeting, Council resolved:

1.   Council investigate entry only on Wharf Street and use a part of Wharf Street suitable as a turning bay to come back down Wharf Street to turn left into the Woolgoolga Beach Holiday Park.

2.   Council relocate office building to Wharf Street entry as per plan.

3.   Exit point on Beach Street and turn left only sign so vans will travel short distance along Beach Street into Queen Street thus avoiding the CBD.

4.   Due to entry point only being on Wharf Street, approximately 3 car parks are lost therefore Council to find 3 compensatory car spaces.

5.   Council request the Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust revise and update the draft Woolgoolga Beach Reserve Plan of Management incorporating the relocated entry and report back to Council with submissions made during its exhibition.

6.   Council finalise the preliminary draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan incorporating the relocated entry (including replacement car parking, the Wharf Street interface and laneway upgrading) including reference to the amendments to entry/exit contained in point 1 above and report back to Council seeking endorsement for its exhibition.

7.   Council notify parties who made submission during community engagement described in this report of Council’s decision.

8.   A report to be bought back to Council for the next meeting.

Accordingly, at its Ordinary Meeting of 28 April 2016 Council considered a further report and resolved that Council:

1.   Notes the information provided within this report.

2.   Considers a report at the meeting of 26 May 2016 in relation to options for alternative entries to the Woolgoolga Beach Holiday Park based on the following:

·    Access comprising a turning bay on Wharf Street; left turn into the holiday park; exit via Beach Street and compensatory parking.

·    Access comprising a turning bay on Wharf Street; left turn entry and exit for the holiday park and compensatory parking.

3.   That the Council undertake at the earliest possible time the placement of an advertisement outlining the proposal and seeking comment on Council's pathway forward for a period of 14 days.

The outcomes of this consultation process were presented to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 9 June 2016. Council’s final resolution on this matter is as follows:

That Council:

1.   Endorses the relocation of the entrance to the Woolgoolga Beach Holiday Park from its current location in Beach Street to Wharf Street with a turning bay and additional parking on Wharf Street as shown in Attachment 5 with the inclusion of kerb and guttering.

2.   Request the Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust revise and update the draft Woolgoolga Beach Reserve Plan of Management incorporating the relocated entry and report back to Council with submissions made during its exhibition.

3.   Finalise the preliminary draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan incorporating the relocated entry (including turning bay and additional parking on Wharf Street) and report back to Council seeking endorsement for its exhibition.

4.   Notify parties who made submission during community engagement of Council’s decision.

Traffic and Parking

Based on significant community feedback on traffic and parking matters associated with the relocation of the Holiday Park access, specialised consultants MRCagney were engaged by Council to undertake additional traffic and parking analysis to inform the Masterplan.

MRCagney is one of Australia’s leading contributors to urban street design and the planning, design and development of liveable places.

As part of the additional traffic and parking analysis, MRCagney facilitated a series of workshops for traders and community members to discuss the impact of people movement, traffic and parking on the quality of the Woolgoolga Town Centre.

Feedback from the workshops has informed MRCagney’s input into the draft Masterplan and a copy of the Traffic and Parking Study prepared by MRCagney is provided as Attachment 3 to this report.

Finalisation

A draft town centre Masterplan has been prepared by Lat27 comprising the outcomes of community engagement events facilitated for the project and input from consultant advisors; MRCagney; and Council's project team.

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s endorsement for the exhibition of the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan, provided as Attachments 1 and 2 to this report.

Issues:

·     Plan of Management - Southern Section of Woolgoolga Beach Reserve

As previously discussed, Council received several requests for the integration of the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan and draft Beach Reserve PoM for the southern section of Woolgoolga Beach Reserve during the initial stages of the Masterplan review project.

Noting that the two projects have different statutory requirements and functions, Council recognised that the resulting plans needed to work in harmony to provide positive outcomes to the Woolgoolga community. On this basis, Council engaged consultants Lat27 to finalise the Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan to ensure that the outputs within the Masterplan are reflective of community issues raised as part of both the Masterplan and PoM projects.

An updated draft Beach Reserve PoM for the southern section of Woolgoolga Beach Reserve was endorsed by Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 28 July 2016 and referred to the Minister responsible for Crown Land for adoption of the final plan. Council was notified on the 8 April 2017 that the Minister responsible for Crown Land has adopted the Plan.

The PoM for the southern section of Woolgoolga Beach reserve has been taken into consideration as part of the preparation of the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan to ensure that both plans provide for a consistent outcome for the community.

·     Traffic and Parking

Traffic and parking matters have been consistently raised during stakeholder engagement processes undertaken for the Masterplan review project, particularly during consultation relating to the relocation of the Woolgoolga Holiday Park entrance.

To ensure that the Masterplan satisfactorily addresses traffic and parking matters, consultants MRCagney were engaged by Council to undertake additional traffic and parking analysis to inform the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan. A copy of the Traffic and Parking Study completed by MRCagney is provided as Attachment 3 to this report.

The Traffic and Parking Study identifies an overwhelming message from the community to augment the existing ‘green village’ characteristics of Woolgoolga with new initiatives to improve the street level vitality of the town. The study found that the most valued attributes identified in Woolgoolga by the community relate to the ability to walk, cycle, shop locally and interact with the village as a human, rather than simply drive a car.

A number of impediments to realising these attributes are noted in the Traffic and Parking Study such as a lack of a consistent footpath network of acceptable quality, inadequate street trees and shade, inadequate pedestrian crossings, inadequate bike network, lack of end of trip facilities, poor quality intersection treatments and inadequate surface treatments.

The Traffic and Parking study notes that Woolgoolga is fortunate to have a reasonably strong grid pattern of streets in the town centre which inherently provide opportunities for traffic to filter through the network in various ways via any combination of the streets in the event of an emergency, road closure or extreme traffic congestion. The study also notes that some newer subdivisions feature a hierarchy of streets characterised by a disconnected network of curvilinear alignments and cul-de-sacs which can unnecessarily increase walking distances and hinder easy wayfinding. The study recommends this latter type of street design is avoided in future subdivisions.

The study recommends a contemporary street hierarchy for Woolgoolga that responds to the needs of adjacent land use and people, rather than simply the throughput of traffic. Four street types are recommended for the town centre recognising the dual function of streets as ‘links’ (for moving people and things) and ‘places’ (to meet, walk, play, shop and do business), and focusing on delivering streets that correctly balance these two functions.

In respect to parking, the study identified minimum parking rate requirements for development and a general oversupply of parking as the most significant contributors to a lack of activity and prosperity in the Woolgoolga town centre. Parking surveys found that town centre parking reached peak occupancy of 65% during the weekday peak, and weekend occupancy was lower. Occupancy rates of this order are indicative of a supply of parking that is so plentiful that the levels of pedestrian and bike riding activity in town will be minimal which has a significant impact on footfall past shopfronts, and people spending less time (and hence money) in town.

On the basis of these observations, the Traffic and Parking study identifies the following key actions that aim to make Woolgoolga a genuine prosperous and sustainable regional town:

-      Remove minimum parking requirements for new development within the town centre;

-      Implement a new street hierarchy based on the needs of people and adjacent land use, not just cars;

-      Support a more diverse mix of attached development in town;

-      Support walk/ride to School programs and prioritise foot/bike path improvement around Schools;

-      Pursue safety improvements through slower speed and appropriate street design, not bigger roads; and

-      Return ‘place’ qualities and a focus on pedestrians to the town’s main streets.

The draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan includes a project relating to people movement and transport systems which includes the preparation of a People Movement & Transport Strategy based on the Principles of the Traffic and Parking Study comprising:

-      Annual parking surveys to ensure parking demand remains within acceptable thresholds;

-      Consideration of funding mechanisms for the implementation of the strategy (i.e. a developer contributions plan, grant funding, public/private partnerships);

-      Updating Council’s Bike Plan to provide protected on-street bike lanes;

-      Progressive retrofitting of a higher standard of footpaths including street trees and associated landscaping; and

-      Enhancement of bus stops such as quality shelters, shade, transit information and lighting.

The masterplan has also incorporated the recommendations from the Traffic and Parking Study, such as the recommended street hierarchy and implementation actions, including amendments to Council’s planning controls relating to minimum parking requirements and the inclusion of design criteria for new development and subdivision proposals. Public realm works are also proposed in the implementation section of the Plan which are based on the recommended street hierarchy sections and intersection improvements in the Traffic and Parking Study, including pedestrian paths, street trees and bike networks.

·     Height and Floor Space Ratio

Council’s existing planning controls provide for a maximum building height of 15.5m (five storeys) within the Beach Street Village Precinct, including Beach Street.

Consultation undertaken with the community identified a preference for a maximum of three storey development on Beach Street, with a third storey setback to reduce the visual impact from the street.

In response to this feedback, the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan proposes building heights of a three storey scale for the Beach Street Village Precinct, excluding a few key sites which have been identified as being suitable for five storey development, subject to strict architectural design criteria and public realm improvements. These key sites are proposed to retain their existing 15.5m height limit.

The Beach Street Village will be the main destination for casual shopping, dining and cultural and entertainment activities. The scale of buildings therefore needs to appropriately accommodate future growth while maintaining a village quality.

To ensure that taller development on the key sites contributes positively to the village and streetscape, specific design controls have been recommended within the Masterplan, such as: the consolidation of a minimum site area; high standards of architectural quality including façade articulation and visually diverse street facades; ground floor shop fronts of a certain width with active retail or commercial uses that maximise glazing and window display; expressed entries to upper floors; maximising opportunities for footpath dining; continuous awnings to the street frontage; inter-block links; and flexibility for future laneway activation.

The implementation section of the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan includes an action to update Council’s planning controls to ensure that this design criteria is applied to new development within the Woolgoolga town centre. Further discussion on this matter is provided in the following point.

·     Amendments to Planning Controls & Other Strategies

If Council adopts the final Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan as proposed, amendments to Council’s existing planning controls will be required to ensure that the recommendations and actions contained within the Masterplan are realised; including:

-      Reducing maximum buildings heights within the Beach Street Village Precinct (excluding the key sites propose for taller development);

-      Reviewing Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2013 to ensure that land use zones and permitted land uses within the town centre study area facilitate the outcomes of the Masterplan;

-      Introducing design criteria within Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan 2015 for new development within each of the distinct precincts identified within the Masterplan; and

-      Updating Council’s parking controls to accord with the recommendations of the Traffic and Parking Study prepared by MRCagney (March 2016).

Amendments to other Council endorsed strategies and plans may also be required where the recommendations and actions contained within the Masterplan are inconsistent. Any such amendments would constitute a separate and additional body of work to finalisation of the Masterplan.

·     Implementation

The implementation section of the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan (Part B) contains a number of projects to achieve the overall goals of the Masterplan and their priority for implementation.

The implementation section includes a project relating to the preparation of a people movement and transport strategy comprising the consideration of funding mechanisms for the implementation of the strategy (i.e. a developer contributions plan, grant funding, public/private partnerships).

There is currently no funding available for the implementation of the other projects in Part B of the Masterplan. As such, funding would be required through Council’s future Delivery Program or alternatively through such options as grants and/or public/private partnerships.

Options:

1.   Adopt the recommendations of this report to enable the public exhibition of the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan. This option will enable Council to seek feedback from the community and stakeholders on the proposed strategies and actions within the draft Masterplan to ensure that the final Masterplan reflects the desires and needs of the community and stakeholders.

2.   Reject the recommendations provided in this report. This option will result in the retention of an outdated Woolgoolga Town Centre Study (1996).

Option 1 is recommended.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Environmental factors, including coastal wetlands, riparian environments, the natural foreshore and dune vegetation, flooding, coastal hazards and climate change (including sea level rise and increased rainfall intensity) have been considered in the draft Masterplan.

•     Social

The Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan review project has comprised extensive community and stakeholder consultation to ensure that the community’s current vision for the town is captured. A viable town centre will assist in the development of a stronger social fabric and a vibrant community for Woolgoolga.

•     Civic Leadership

The draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan captures the collective vision for Woolgoolga’s town centre and sets a long term plan to guide future growth and development. Extensive community consultation undertaken as part of the Masterplan review project will ensure that the strategies and actions within the Masterplan are based on the community’s vision and needs for the various precincts which make up the Woolgoolga Township.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Woolgoolga is uniquely placed to take advantage of its regional location, natural assets and township character to build a prosperous future balanced against lifestyle expectations. A revised Masterplan for the Woolgoolga Township will assist the community and stakeholders in realising such future. The Masterplan is a critical part of guiding the orderly development and revitalisation of the Town Centre.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

As discussed previously, the implementation section of the Masterplan (Part B) includes a project relating to the preparation of a people movement and transport strategy comprising the consideration of funding mechanisms for the implementation of the strategy (i.e. a developer contributions plan, grant funding, public/private partnerships).

There is currently no funding available for the implementation of the other projects in Part B of the Masterplan. This has implications for Council’s draft Delivery Program 2017-2021 and Operational Plan 2017-18. Funding would be required to realise the overall goals of the Masterplan either through Council’s future Delivery Program and Operational Plans or through alternative funding such as developer contributions plans, grants and/or public/private partnerships.

Risk Analysis:

The revised Masterplan for the Woolgoolga Town Centre is important, as the current plan is now over 20 years old. A revised plan will assist in driving the development of Woolgoolga to 2036 and will ensure that all recent studies undertaken for the town are taken into account.

Implementation of the recommendations contained within the Traffic and Parking Study may result in a temporary removal of the requirement to provide onsite parking for commercial development within the Woolgoolga business zones. To minimise the risks associated with this strategy, the Masterplan includes a requirement for a review including annual parking surveys to ensure parking demand remains within acceptable thresholds; and the consideration of funding mechanisms for the implementation of the strategy (i.e. a developer contributions plan, grant funding, public/private partnerships).

Consultation:

Extensive consultation has been undertaken for the project as follows:

•     WoolgoolgaWow

The initial steps for the masterplanning process for this project involved the creation of the WoolgoolgaWOW website as a portal for information to the community. This site has had just under 6,000 visitors to date and has been a successful vector in disseminating information to the community and stakeholders.

•     Community Vision Night

A total of 67 people attended the Community Vision Night on 25 February 2014. Attendees included residents, business-owners and stakeholders. The purpose of the night was to identify key values and aspirations held by the community and stakeholders for the future of Woolgoolga. A summary of the night and key findings were reported to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 8 May 2014.

The Community Vision Night identified that maintaining and enhancing a local village environment and ambience is very important to the community. The beach, the local environment and the amenity of the town were key unifying values that were consistently supported by workshop participants.

•     Business Confidence Survey

The early consultation phase included the completion of a confidential Business Retention and Expansion (BRE) Survey, to establish how confident businesses were with Woolgoolga now that the highway bypass has occurred; and also for the year following the bypass. The survey consisted of 25 questions addressing a range of issues on business confidence, trade and patronage characteristics and perceptions of the township.

A total of 46 businesses responded to the survey. Results of the survey were reported to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 8 May 2014.

The survey indicated that the business community had confidence in Woolgoolga as a place to do business and confidence for their business in the town. There was a strong positive feedback on potential initiatives that Council could undertake to assist improve business prospects, including facilitating residential growth to increase population, street beautification works, new major retail development, improved walkways and cycleways and new tourist development.

•     Ideas Map

An online Ideas Map was provided on the WoolgoolgaWOW website for people to ‘pin’ a comment or an idea in relation to a specific location. This map was live on the website from mid-February to 31 March 2014. A total of 2150 hits were made on the Ideas Map, with a total of 1032 people visiting the map in the six weeks that it was open for comment. A total of 451 comments were made on the Ideas Map. The comments were assessed and analysed thematically and an overview report was reported to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 8 May 2014. Further analyses of the comments made on the Ideas Map have been undertaken during the development of the draft Masterplan to capture the community's vision and opinion.

•     Discussions with Woolgoolga and Northern Beaches Chamber of Commerce

Several meetings were held with the Woolgoolga and Northern Beaches Chamber of Commerce in the initial phase of the project, including a presentation about the Woolgoolga Town Centre Study Review and Masterplan at a Chamber breakfast on 6 March 2014. Council has actively engaged with the Chamber to promote the project and information on the WoolgoolgaWOW website.

•     Negotiations with NSW Roads and Maritime Services

Council lobbied NSW Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) to seek funding to address possible social and economic impacts from the Woolgoolga bypass as part of the Pacific Highway Sapphire to Woolgoolga project. Council staff wrote to RMS on 11 April 2013 and the Minister for Roads on 20 June 2013. A response was received from RMS on 25 July 2013 and from the Minister for Roads on 9 August 2013. Copies of these letters were reported to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 8 May 2014.

The response from the Government was that a socio-economic assessment was undertaken as part of the environmental assessment of the upgrade, and that conditions of the project approval do not require RMS to prepare an additional economic study. RMS advised further that “it would be pleased to work with Council, the Woolgoolga Chamber of Commerce and the community to help identify opportunities for the local economy following the opening of the bypass project to traffic”.

The RMS subsequently agreed in principal to fund additional urban design work as part of the Woolgoolga Town Centre Review focusing on the change in role and function of the by-passed section of the Pacific Highway through Woolgoolga.

Following Council’s endorsement of a final town centre masterplan for Woolgoolga, Council will be in a position to follow up this funding from the RMS to implement the urban design strategies proposed for the Solitary Islands Way within the masterplan.

•     Holiday Park Entrance Consultation

As discussed previously, a recommendation was put forward at Council’s Ordinary Meeting of 10 December 2015 seeking in principle support to relocate the entry to the Woolgoolga Beach Holiday Park from Beach Street to Wharf Street.

Council’s resolution on this matter required public exhibition of a concept plan displaying the alternative entry point for the Holiday Park. This concept plan was placed on formal public exhibition from 9 January 2016 to 12 February 2016. Additional consultation was also undertaken with affected landholders from 16 February 2016 to 1 March 2016.

The outcomes of the public exhibition were reported to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 14 April 2014.

Council resolved to investigate an alternative concept plan for the relocation of the Holiday Park entry comprising an entrance on Wharf Street; the use of Wharf Street as a turning bay to facilitate a left hand turn into the Park; and an exit point on Beach Street with a left hand turn directing traffic along Beach Street into Queen Street. At its Ordinary Meeting of 28 April 2016, Council further resolved to consider two options for alternative entries to the Holiday Park:

1.   Access comprising a turning bay on Wharf Street; left turn into the holiday park; exit via Beach Street and compensatory parking; and

2.   Access comprising a turning bay on Wharf Street; left turn entry and exit for the holiday park and compensatory parking.

In response to this resolution, Council staff prepared two concept proposals which were placed on public exhibition from 7 May 2016 to 22 May 2016. Face to face consultation was also undertaken with affected residents and businesses by Council’s staff on 9 May 2016 to 10 May 2016.

The outcomes of this consultation process were presented to Council at its Ordinary Meeting of 9 June 2016. Council’s resolution on this matter was to endorse the relocation of the entrance to the Woolgoolga Beach Holiday Park from its current location in Beach Street to Wharf Street with a turning bay and additional parking on Wharf Street with the inclusion of kerb and guttering.

•     Traffic and Parking Workshops

Consultants MRCagney facilitated a community workshop in Woolgoolga on the 13 October 2016, followed by a Traders Breakfast and drop in session on the 14 October 2016 to discuss the impact of people movement, traffic and parking on the quality of the Woolgoolga Town Centre. The outcomes of this consultation have been considered in the masterplanning process.

•     Stakeholder Presentation

Consultants Lat27 and MRCagney facilitated a stakeholder presentation on the 3 April 2017 to present the findings of the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan and Traffic and Parking Study. This presentation was facilitated to ensure that relevant stakeholders understood the principles and philosophies behind the recommended strategies and actions within the draft Masterplan.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Coffs Harbour City Council is committed to the ongoing development and revitalisation of the entire City. Council sees the Woolgoolga Town Centre playing a pivotal role in the ongoing growth and development of the Woolgoolga and Northern Beaches locality, through the creation of economic, social and cultural opportunities. This project involves the review and updating of the Woolgoolga Town Centre Study 1996.

Council’s Business Centres Hierarchy Review Final Report 2012 identified the importance of assisting the Woolgoolga Town Centre improve its attractiveness as a tourist destination with an improved relationship with the beach and coastal area (which is a significant asset of the Town Centre). It also identified the need for a comprehensive Business Retention and Expansion (BRE) Survey to supplement the results of the Woolgoolga Township Marketing Action Plan 2011 and findings of the previous economic studies.

A related project is the draft PoM for the southern section of Woolgoolga Beach Reserve. A PoM for the southern section of Woolgoolga Beach Reserve has since been adopted by the Minister responsible for Crown Land.

There are no statutory requirements in relation to preparing a Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan. Once completed, recommendations of the final adopted Masterplan may be used to inform amendments to Council’s planning controls.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Following Council’s endorsement to exhibit the draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan, the Masterplan will be placed on public exhibition for a minimum period of 28 days. Any submission made during the exhibition period will then be taken into consideration as part of the finalisation of the Masterplan. A further report will then be made to Council seeking adoption of the final plan. The timeframe for the adoption of the final plan is unknown given that it is reliant upon the public exhibition process.

Conclusion:

The completion of the Pacific Highway Bypass and the addition of a new major retail chain supermarket on Solitary Islands Way have underpinned a fundamental change to the role and structure of Woolgoolga – a transformation from a thoroughfare to a destination town. It is therefore essential that a new direction for the town is established that strikes a balance between harnessing growth opportunities and nurturing Woolgoolga’s unique charm.

The draft Woolgoolga Town Centre Masterplan 2017 captures the collective vision for Woolgoolga’s town centre and sets a long term plan to guide future growth and development whilst preserving the attributes which make Woolgoolga unique. This report seeks Council’s approval to exhibit the draft Plan (Attachments 1 and 2).

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                 11 May 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                 11 May 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                 11 May 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                                          11 May 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                 11 May 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               11 May 2017

SC17/23       Coffs Harbour Public Realm Strategy Project Plan

Author:                        Senior Planner / Urban Designer

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

Coffs Harbour 2030:   PL2 Our public spaces are enjoyed by all our people

Attachments:              ATT1  SC17/23   Project Plan - Coffs Harbour Public Realm Strategy  

 

Executive Summary

Coffs Harbour City Council’s Open Space Strategy 2010 and Street Tree Masterplan 1999 have both reached their intended expiry date and thus require review and updating.

The purpose of this project is to update these two documents as part of a more comprehensive Public Realm Strategy which provides for a broader understanding of open space to include the public realm, not just green spaces but all external spaces available for public use, such as: main streets, streets, forecourts, squares, bicycle and pedestrian links and waterways.

In essence, the Public Realm Strategy will provide a vision and direction for the public realm within the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area (LGA). The Strategy will be utilised across Council to assist with the planning, design and management of the public realm with the ultimate aim of developing a sense of place for Coffs Harbour’s public spaces. The Strategy will also provide for a cohesive and legible public realm to ensure that public spaces within the LGA respond to increasing population and demographic change, and our changing lifestyles.

The purpose of this report is to provide Council with a Project Plan outlining the delivery of the project, and to advise how it is proposed to fund the project.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Endorse the Project Plan for the Coffs Harbour Public Realm Strategy (Attachment 1).

2.       Engage an appropriately qualified consultant(s) to complete the project as described within the Project Plan (Attachment 1), once funds become available.

 

Report

Description of Item:

The public realm comprises both ‘physical’ and ‘social’ elements, where the physical elements of the public realm refers to the series of spaces and settings that support or facilitate public life; and where the social elements of the public realm refer to the interactions, activities and events occurring there.

The Public Realm Strategy will provide the necessary framework for Council to integrate and coordinate various departments and disciplines to assist in the implementation of a coherent public realm for the community. It will also assist in the identification of relevant Council strategies, policies and plans that impact on public spaces and assist in the delivery and maintenance of the public realm that is captured within these documents. An integrated approach will allow the effective and efficient delivery of a high quality public realm and its spaces and places for the community.

The Public Realm Strategy will be broken up into two parts:

·    Part 1 will comprise the strategic context including the characterisation of places/spaces within the LGA, the vision and direction for Coffs Harbour’s public realm, methodology, types of public spaces, benchmarks, principles and recommended actions.

·    Part 2 will comprise detailed analysis of each of the places identified in Part 1 of the Strategy in consultation with stakeholders. This analysis will include (but will not be limited to) defining the desired character; streetscapes and urban design; people and vehicle movement networks; public art; companion animals management; public spaces; and cultural heritage. This part will also include an overview of recreational assets within the LGA in respect to their suitability for the current needs of the community.

Implementation of the Public Realm Strategy will occur via the creation of ‘Place Manuals’ for the various places identified in Part 1 of the Strategy. These ‘Place Manuals’ will be prepared as part of a separate ‘Place Manual Project’ which is outside the scope of this Project Plan.

The Place Manual Project will be integral to the implementation of Council’s Public Realm Strategy and Local Growth Management Strategy - Residential Component (currently being prepared). The outcomes of this separate project will be the development of a ‘Place Manual’ for each of the various places identified in Part 1 of the Public Realm Strategy. Each place manual will define specific design criteria and desired outcomes based on the analysis undertaken in Part 2 of the Public Realm Strategy and the ‘Actions’ contained within Council’s Residential Strategy.

The following diagram illustrates the context in which the Public Realm Strategy will operate:

Figure 1: Public Realm Strategy Context

Issues:

A Public Realm Strategy for the Coffs Harbour LGA is needed to:

-      Update Council’s existing Open Space Strategy 2010 and Street Tree Masterplan 1999;

-      Deliver a contemporary, cohesive and long-term unified vision for the public realm of the Coffs Harbour LGA;

-      Deliver broad strategic goals of both Council and the community;

-      Deliver high quality public spaces;

-      Ensure that public space responds to increasing population, demographic change and changing lifestyles;

-      Link strategic issues, funding and maintenance to ensure that the desired vision across the public realm is achievable; and

-      Activate public spaces within the LGA.

Key issues which will need to be addressed in the preparation of the Public Realm Strategy include the following:

-      Strategic context within the planning framework;

-      Existing public spaces within the LGA and their suitability for the current needs of the community;

-      Emerging trends in public spaces;

-      Emerging coastal hazards and threats;

-      Environmental and social characteristics/influences;

-      Demographic shifts and changing lifestyles;

-      Development contributions within the public realm; and

-      Equitable distribution of public open space within the LGA.

Options:

1.   Adopt the recommendations of this report to enable the preparation of a Public Realm Strategy for the Coffs Harbour LGA. This option will enable Council to deliver high quality public spaces based on the community’s vision and needs.

2.   Reject the recommendations provided in this report. This option will result in the retention of the outdated Coffs Harbour City Council Open Space Strategy 2010 and Street Tree Masterplan 1999 for the LGA, and missed opportunities to improve public realm outcomes.

Sustainability Assessment:

·   Environment

Environmental factors will be considered in the development of a Public Realm Strategy. Part 1 of the Public Realm Strategy will include the identification of the ‘types’ of spaces within the Coffs Harbour LGA, such as environmental spaces, green links (significant vegetation links), blue links (waterways) and parks and reserves. Part 1 of the Strategy will also identify key relevant strategies which apply to these types of spaces and the associated management outcomes of for these spaces. Part 2 of the Strategy will provide for further analysis of such spaces and community consultation to ensure that Council’s maintenance of such spaces accords with the community’s vision and needs, and to ensure that the values of these spaces are recognised in the ongoing maintenance and use of such spaces.

·   Social

The development of a Public Realm Strategy for the Coffs Harbour LGA will ensure that the broad strategic goals of both Council and the Community relating to the public realm are realised. In this regard, the Project Plan for the preparation of Part 1 of the Strategy incorporates the consideration of the outcomes of the MyCoffs project to ensure that the community’s current vision for the public realm is captured. Extensive stakeholder consultation and engagement will also occur in the preparation of Part 2 of the Strategy as part of the detailed analysis of places around the LGA.

·   Civic Leadership

A Public Realm Strategy for the Coffs Harbour LGA will significantly improve the quality of the public realm for the community. Utilisation of the outcomes from the MyCoffs project as part of the preparation of Part 1 of the Strategy will ensure that public realm improvements are based on the community’s vision and needs for the various distinctive places which make up the LGA.

·   Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The Public Realm Strategy will provide the necessary framework for Council to integrate and coordinate various departments and disciplines within the organisation which relate to the public realm. An integrated approach will provide for a much more effective and efficient delivery of high quality public realm outcomes.

·   Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

As discussed in the Project Plan (Attachment 1), it is proposed to seek the services of a professional consultant(s) to prepare Parts 1 and 2 of the Strategy. Part 1 has been assessed at $97,000.00 (inc GST) and Part 2 has been assessed at $109,000.00 (inc GST). In addition, funds have been allocated to cover project management and contingencies, internal printing, community engagement activities, advertising and meeting facilities required for the duration of each part of the project.

Council’s draft Operational Plan 2017/18 has allocated project funds to complete Part 1 of the project. Council’s draft Delivery Program 2017 to 2021 has allocated sufficient funds to complete Part 2 of this project. Once the Operational Plan 2017/18 is adopted, and if the Public Realm Strategy Part 1 is included, it will be possible to engage consultants to complete Part 1. Part 2 will not be commenced until funds are allocated in the 2018/19 Operational Plan.

Risk Analysis:

A draft Public Realm Strategy will be placed on public exhibition prior to its final adoption by Council, thereby providing opportunity for stakeholder and community engagement and thus reducing Council’s risk. Detailed analysis and significant stakeholder engagement will be undertaken as part of the preparation of Part 2 of the Public Realm Strategy to further minimise Council’s risk.

Consultation:

The Project Plan (Attachment 1) for the preparation of a Public Realm Strategy for the Coffs Harbour LGA incorporates the consideration of the outcomes of the MyCoffs project to ensure that the community’s current vision for the public realm is captured.

Extensive stakeholder and community engagement will also be undertaken during the preparation of Part 2 of the Strategy as part of the detailed analysis of each ‘place’.

In addition, the project plan for the preparation of the Strategy includes a requirement for the public exhibition of the draft Strategy to ensure that the community is actively engaged throughout the process.

Following the public exhibition of the plan, a final report will be presented back to Council accompanied by submissions made during the formal exhibition period.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

There are no statutory requirements in relation to preparing a Public Realm Strategy, apart from legislative requirements associated with the management of certain land tenures under the Local Government Act 1993, Crown Lands Act 1989 and National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974.

Once completed, the design criteria and design outcomes will inform the preparation of ‘Place Manuals’ in conjunction with the actions contained within Council’s Residential Strategy. The Place Manuals will then inform future amendments to Council’s statutory planning framework and the preparation or review of other relevant plans and strategies such as Council’s:

-      Sports Facility Plan;

-      Cultural Strategic Plan;

-      Masterplans and Plans of Management;

-      Companion Animals Management Plan;

-      Public Art Strategy;

-      Integrated Transport Plan;

-      Engineering Drawings;

-      Development Contribution Plans;

-      Detail Design Plans;

-      Development Specifications; and

-      Other relevant Council policies and guidelines.

Implementation Date / Priority:

As discussed above, Council’s draft Operational Plan 2017/18 has allocated sufficient project funds to complete Part 1 of the project. Council’s draft Delivery Program 2017 to 2021 has also allocated sufficient funds to complete Part 2 of this project. If Council’s adopted Operational Plan for 2017/18 retains funds to complete Part 1 of the project, Part 1 of the project can commence in July 2017 as detailed in the Project Plan (Attachment 1).

Conclusion:

The Public Realm Strategy will provide the necessary framework for Council to integrate and coordinate various departments and disciplines within the organisation that affect the public realm. This integrated approach will provide for a much more effective and efficient delivery of a high quality public realm in accordance with Council’s resources and the community’s vision and needs.


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                 11 May 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               11 May 2017

SI17/10         Traffic Committee No. 2/2017

Author:                        Senior Engineering Officer - Traffic

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

Coffs Harbour 2030:   MA2 We have a system of well-maintained and safe roads for all users

Attachments:              ATT1  SI17/10     Minutes Traffic Committee Meeting 2-2017 held on 11 April 2017

ATT2  SI17/10     Instruments Traffic Committee Meeting 2-2017 held on 11 April 2017  

 

Executive Summary

The Local Traffic Committee (LTC) Meeting minutes are presented to Council for approval comprising nine regulatory traffic facilities plans, two temporary road closures events and four deferred items.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.    Resolves the following major LTC items:

 

T.18 - Parking Issues - Marjorie Street/Beryl Street Court House­ 6247203 R.505200

That approval be given to install No Stopping zones as follows;

a.    10m south of Beryl Street on the west side of Marjorie Street to the intersection of Beryl Street, Coffs Harbour.

b.    90m south of Beryl Street on the east side of Marjorie Street to the intersection of Beryl Street, Coffs Harbour, as per plan T.18-2017.

 

T.19 – Parking Issues - Gaudrons Road, Sapphire Beach 6228784 R.506500

That approval be given for a No Stopping zone to be installed for approx. 30m on the north side of Gaudrons Road, Sapphire Beach in front of the entrances to Nos. 10 & 18, as per plan T.19-2017.

 

T. 20-Solitary Islands Way / Seacrest Roundabout 6250225

 

That approval be given for the installation of new regulatory signage and line marking as part of the new roundabout construction at the intersection of Solitary Islands Way, Seacrest Boulevard and Holloways Road, Sandy Beach, as per approved CHCC design drawing 2160700 sheet 14.

 

T.25 – Load/ Length Limits - Harbour Drive/Gordon Street/Hogbin Drive and Orlando Street Coffs Harbour

That approval be given for the following changes to the current Load/ Length Limits on Harbour Drive, Hogbin Drive, Orlando Street, Gordon Street, and Vernon Street, Coffs Harbour.

 

LOCATION

PROPOSED CHANGES

Hogbin Dr - Harbour Dr to Arthur St

No Trucks 15t and over

Orlando St - Hogbin Dr to Marina Pde

No Trucks 15t and over

Harbour Dr - Marina Parade  to Hogbin Dr

No Trucks 15t and over

Harbour Dr - Gordon St to Pacific Highway

Remove 'NO RIGHT/LEFT TURN VEHICLES UNDER 8.8 EXEMPT' signage from Gordon Street and remove 40km/h signage in Harbour Drive (westbound)

 

The decision regarding Vernon St - Gordon St to Duke St (eastbound) was deferred pending further information.

 

T.28 – 40k zone – Fiddaman Road, Emerald Beach 6231874 R.507240

This area does not meet the RMS criteria for a 40kph High Pedestrian Activity Zone, which is designed for urban commercial centres.  Further studies are to be conducted to determine if the road meets the warrants for a lineal 40kph zone.

 

T.29 - Temporary Road Closure - 2017 Sawtell Chilli Festival  6274204 R.501520

That a 5 year approval be given for the temporary road closure of First Avenue, Sawtell, between 50m north of Second Avenue and Boronia Street, and Second Avenue from 30m west and 35m east of First Avenue between the hours of 6.00am and 6.00pm on the first Saturday in July each year from 2017 to 2022, subject to the following:

a.    A current insurance Certificate of Currency for a minimum insured amount of $20,000,000 and noting the Coffs Harbour City Council as an interested party for the event be submitted by 1st June each year.

b.    NSW Police approval is obtained and submitted to Council by 1st June each year.

c.    The submission and approval of relevant Council event application/s and compliance with any conditions imposed therein.

d.    The following traffic control conditions shall also be observed:

i.     Traffic Control Plans to include a map indicating any alternative routes required for traffic detours.

ii.    Traffic Control Plans to be drawn to scale and indicate the provision of passageways and clearances for pedestrian and emergency access.  Plans should be prepared in accordance with Roads & Maritime Services Guide to Traffic Control at Worksites and submitted to Council by 1st June each year.

iii.   All signage erected for the event should not cause a hazard for motorists or pedestrians and be removed immediately following the completion of the event.

iv.   Conformance with approved Traffic Management Plan and associated Traffic Control Plans which shall be implemented and controlled by Roads & Maritime Services accredited persons.

e.    Consultation with emergency services (Fire & Ambulance) and any identified issues addressed in a timely manner.

f.     Consultation with bus and taxi operators and arrangements made for provision of services for the duration of the event.

g.    Community and affected business consultation including adequate response/action to any raised concerns.

h.    Arrangements made for private property access and egress affected by the event.

i.     The event organiser notifies local community of the impact of the event/s by advertising in the Coffs Coast Advocate a minimum of one week prior to the operational impacts taking effect.  The advertising must include the event name, specifics of any traffic impacts or road closures and times, alternative route arrangements, event organiser, a personal contact name and a telephone number for all event related enquiries or complaints.

j.     That the applicant organise for the events to be listed on Coffs Harbour City Council website.

k.    The organisers are responsible for all costs associated with the temporary closure and clean up, including advertising.

 

T.30 –Temporary Road Closures - 2017 Woolgoolga Curryfest  5445373

That approval to be given to the temporary road closure of the following:

 

Saturday 23 September 2017

·      Beach Street from Wharf Street to Carrington Street, Woolgoolga 5.00am to 7.00pm

·      Queen Street from Beach Street to Market Street, Woolgoolga 5.00am to 7.00pm

 

Saturday 30 September

·      Market Street from Nightingale Street to Queens Street, Woolgoolga (Eat Street 3.00pm-12.00am )

 

for the purpose of conducting the Woolgoolga Curryfest on Saturday 23 September 2017 and night time Eat Street on Saturday 30 September 2017 subject to:

a.    A current insurance Certificate of Currency for a minimum insured amount of $20,000,000 and noting the Coffs Harbour City Council as an interested party for the event be submitted by 1st August 2017.

b.    NSW Police approval is obtained and submitted to Council by 1st August 2017.

c.    The submission and approval of relevant council event application/s and compliance with any conditions imposed therein.

d.    The following traffic control conditions shall also be observed:

i.     Traffic Control Plans to include a map indicating any alternative routes required for traffic detours.

ii.    Traffic Control Plans to be drawn to scale and indicate the provision of passageways and clearances for pedestrian and emergency access.  Plans should be prepared in accordance with Roads & Maritime Services Guide to Traffic Control at Worksites and submitted to Council by 1st August 2017.

iii.   All signage erected for the event should not cause a hazard for motorists or pedestrians and be removed immediately following the completion of the event.

iv.   Conformance with approved Traffic Management Plan and associated Traffic Control Plans which shall be implemented and controlled by Roads & Maritime Services accredited persons.

e.    Consultation with emergency services (Fire & Ambulance) and any identified issues addressed in a timely manner.

f.     Consultation with bus and taxi operators and arrangements made for provision of services for the duration of the event.

g.    Community and affected business consultation including adequate response/action to any raised concerns.

h.    Arrangements made for private property access and egress affected by the event.

i.     The event organiser notifies local community of the impact of the event/s by advertising in the Woolgoolga Advertiser a minimum of one week prior to the operational impacts taking effect. The advertising must include the event name, specifics of any traffic impacts or road closures and times, alternative route arrangements, event organiser, a personal contact name and a telephone number.

j.     That the applicant organise for the events to be listed on Coffs Harbour City Council website.

k.    The organisers are responsible for all costs associated with the temporary closure and clean up, including advertising.

 

2.    Note the following minor LTC items have been authorised by the Acting General Manager persuant to the previously delegated authority of Council:

 

T.21 - Parking Issues - Camperdown Street Coffs Harbour  6268732

 

Deferred, pending further information.

 

T.22 – Woolgoolga Pedestrian Crossing Solitary Island Way  6258473

 

That approval be given for the installation of regulatory signage and line marking as part of the new pedestrian crossing construction at the intersection of Solitary Islands Way and Pullen Street, Woolgoolga as per approved CHCC design drawing 2160203 sheet 1.

 

T.23 – Traffic/Parking Issues - Intersection of Oxley Place/Bray Street Coffs Harbour 6265981

That approval be given for the installation of a No Stopping Zone on the southern side of Bray Street, Coffs Harbour from the corner of Oxley Place to 30m east, as per plan T.23-2017.

 

1.            T.24 – BB Lines Macdougall Street Corindi Beach 5487884

That approval be given for the installation of Barrier (BB) centre line markings in MacDougall Street, Corindi Beach for 10m south from Pacific Street intersection, as per plan T.24-2017.

 

T.26 – No Parking issues in Gilbey Lane, Coffs Harbour 6203662

 

That approval be given for the installation of a No Stopping zone on the southern side of Gilbey Lane between Edinburgh Street and Hood Street, Coffs Harbour, as per plan T.26-2017.

 

T.27 – Park Ave Lane  Shared Zone Coffs Harbour

That approval be given for a 10kph Shared Zone in Park Ave Lane at the southern end of City Square as part of the Coffs Harbour City Square refurbishment retaining the existing Loading Zone on the north side of the lane, as per plan T.27-2017.

 

T.31- Korora Bus Interchange, Korora

Traffic Committee to attend onsite inspection for more information.

 

T.32–Loading Zone to Parking Zone – 2A Minorca Place Toormina 6174004 R.502130

That approval be given to install a loading zone adjacent 4 Minorca Place Toormina (Coffs Coast Pets) and reinstate 1hr parking zone at existing loading zone in front of No 2A, as per plan T.32-2017.

 

3.    Notes that no minor LTC items were subject to referral by either the General Manager nor the LTC for Council resolution.

 

 

Report

Description of Item:

The Local Traffic Committee (LTC) Meeting minutes are presented to Council for approval comprising nine regulatory traffic facilities plans, two temporary road closures events including the Sawtell Chilli Festival and the Woolgoolga Curryfest.

Please note that Traffic Committee is recommending a five year approval for the Sawtell Chilli Festival to reduce ‘red tape’, provided all traffic arrangements remain the same.  This approval is subject to the submission of an updated Traffic Control Plan which should be prepared in accordance with Roads & Maritime Services Guide to Traffic Control at Worksites by an accredited person.

Issues:

Council should note carefully the recommendations of the LTC as they relate to the authorisation of traffic control facilities and prescribed traffic control devices with the aim to improve road safety and traffic management on local roads

Options:

Council’s delegation under the Roads Act 1993 requires Council to seek the advice of the NSW Police and the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) before exercising their delegated functions. This is done via the Local Traffic Committee.

 

In cases where the Local Traffic Committee advice is unanimous, and Council intends to follow that advice, Council may authorise the implementation of the facility or device without further notifying the RMS or the NSW Police.

 

If the Council wishes to act contrary to unanimous LTC advice, then Council must notify in writing, both the NSW Police and the RMS representatives on the LTC.  Council must then refrain from taking any action for 14 days so that the NSW Police or the RMS is given an opportunity to appeal to the Chairperson, Regional Traffic Committee should they wish.

 

In the case of an appeal, the decision of the Chairperson, Regional Traffic Committee is binding and final for matters under the Road Transport (Safety and Traffic Management) Act 1999.

 

Council does not need to notify the NSW Police or the RMS if they decide not to proceed with any proposal for any reason.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Not applicable.

•     Social

The recommendations in the report serve to improve road safety and traffic flow in the Local Government Area.

•     Civic Leadership

Objective - MA2 We have a system of well-maintained and safe roads for all users.

MA 2.2 Facilitate safe traffic, bicycle and pedestrian movement - Provider

 

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Not applicable.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Council has an existing budget for minor works associated with traffic improvements.

Risk Analysis:

The risk assessment has identified the following risks associated with the Local Traffic Committee recommendations:

·    That Council fulfill its delegations as a road manager

·    That Council fail to implement risk mitigation measures identified in the Local Traffic Committee meeting

 

To mitigate these risks it is recommended that Council:

·    Consider carefully the recommendations from the Local Traffic Committee following investigation and approval of the Roads and Maritime Services and the Police

·    That Council implement the recommendations to mitigate the road safety risks.

Consultation:

The Local Traffic Committee members’ attendance is listed on the minutes.  Most of the matters raised were requests from the community.  Relevant stakeholders were consulted and a report was submitted to the Local Traffic Committee meeting.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

·      Traffic control facilities and prescribed traffic control devices may be authorised for use on a road or road related area, whether a public road or on private land, only by the RMS or Council.

·      Traffic may be regulated for various purposes by means of notices or barriers erected by a road authority.

·      Section 50 of the Transport Administration Act 1988 permits RMS to delegate its functions to other public agencies such as Councils.

·      Section 53A Part 6 permits RMS to give directions to Councils in relation to RMS functions.

·      The Road Transport (Safety and Traffic Management) Act 1999, incorporating the Road Rules 2008 provides for a system of traffic laws relating to all vehicles and pedestrians.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Road related modifications will be listed in the works program for installation within two months of the Council meeting.

Conclusion:

Council to confirm Minutes of the formal Traffic Committee Meeting 2/2017 by resolving the actions noted in LTC Items 18, 19, 20, 25, 28, 29, and 30; and Council to note that LTC Items 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 31, and 32 have been actioned under delegation by the Acting General Manager.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                 11 May 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                 11 May 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                                          11 May 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                 11 May 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                                          11 May 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                                          11 May 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                 11 May 2017

PDF Creator 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               11 May 2017

T17/10          TRUST REPORT - Relocation of Marine Rescue Woolgoolga to Arrawarra Headland Facility - Progress Report

Author:                        Manager Holiday Parks and Reserves

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

Coffs Harbour 2030:   LC1 Coffs Harbour is a strong, safe and adaptable community

Attachments:              Nil

 

 

Executive Summary

In accordance with Council’s resolution 2017/3 at its meeting held on 9 February 2017, progress reports are provided to each Council meeting on the relocation of Marine Rescue Woolgoolga to Arrawarra Headland.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council, as Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust, note the progress report.

 

Report

Council, as Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust, is continuing to work with Marine Rescue Woolgoolga (MRW) and Woolgoolga Surf Life Saving Club (WSLSC) to secure suitable bases of operation for each organisation.  After significant investigation work a suitable location for MRW has been found at the Arrawarra Headland Research Station, which is also a Crown Reserve.

The proposed relocations are vitally important to the future operations of both MRW and the WSLSC.  The WSLSC advised the Trust in early 2017 that funding sources are at threat due to the WSLSC project not being ‘spade ready’ by 30 June 2017.

Progressing the proposed relocations has required significant negotiations to change existing tenures and ensure the future operational requirements of all parties are considered.  The land tenure changes required to enable the MRW relocation to occur are complete.  Following initial design work, obtaining quantity surveying estimates and further negotiations, up to $600,000 funding from the Coffs Coast Trust has now been committed to the MRW relocation project.

This report provides progress on the MRW relocation project as at 1 May 2017 (Council/Trust reports due date) and is detailed by milestone in the following table.  It should be noted that the completion of milestones is at certain stages dependent on other parties.  Council officers recognise the critical importance of completing the MRW relocation project as quickly as possible to facilitate WSLSC’s relocation.


 

 

Milestone

Status as at 1 May 2017

Legal access to the Arrawarra Headland facility

Recent discussions with NPWS officers have indicated that a letter of consent could be issued to facilitate access until such time as the Coffs Coast Regional Park Plan of Management is adopted. Once adopted, it is envisaged that the Plan of Management will make the granting of an easement for access permissible. Council is waiting on confirmation from NPWS officers regarding this course of action. The information from NPWS is now overdue and the responsible officer at NPWS has been contacted but there has been no response at the time of writing this report.

 

Final design of the Arrawarra Headland facility

Sub consultants have been engaged by the architect to progress the designs to the tender/construction stage. Electrical drawings have been completed. Structural and Civil drawings completed and awaiting feedback from DA process. Waiting on hydrological drawings which are due 3 May 2017.

 

Development consent for the Arrawarra Headland facility

Development Application has been advertised by CHCC and notification period has commenced.

 

Tender and contract for construction of the Arrawarra Headland facility

Specifications for tender being completed. Waiting for hydrological drawings as per above.

 

Surrender of Marine Rescue lease at Woolgoolga Beach Reserve

Final negotiations with MR are proceeding regarding minor elements for inclusion at Arrawarra Headland and discussions held regarding future of Woolgoolga Reserve markets. Waiting on financials from MR to determine future sponsorship arrangements and market details.

 

The meeting with Kevin Hogan MP was held on 11 April 2017 to provide him with an update on project’s progress and to assist in securing existing grant funding. As a result of the meeting, Mr Hogan will be forwarding to Council information direct from the funding body regarding the requirements to satisfy the body and secure the grant funds. This information is yet to be received.