Coffs Harbour City Council

19 April 2017

 

Ordinary Council Meeting

 

The above meeting will be held in the Council Administration Building

Cnr Coff and Castle Streets, Coffs Harbour on:

 

Thursday, 27 April 2017

 

The meeting commences at 5.00pm and your attendance is requested.

 

 

AGENDA

 

1.         Opening of Ordinary Meeting

2.         Acknowledgment of Country

3.         Disclosure of Interest

4.         Apologies

5.         Public Addresses / Public Forum

6.         Mayoral Minute

7.         Mayoral Actions under Delegated Authority

8.         Confirmation of Minutes

9.         Rescission Motion

10.      Notices of Motion - General

11.      General Manager’s Reports

12.      Notices of Motion – Business Services

13.      Directorate Reports – Business Services

14.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Communities

15.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Communities

16.      Notices of Motion – Sustainable Infrastructure

17.      Directorate Reports – Sustainable Infrastructure

18.      Trust Reports

19.      Requests for Leave of Absence

20.      Questions On Notice

21.      Matters of an Urgent Nature

22.      Consideration of Confidential Items (if any)

23.      Close of Ordinary Meeting.

 

 

Steve  McGrath

General Manager

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

Order of Business  

Notices of Motion General

NOM17/06      Supporting movements to ban single use plastic bags................. 3

General Manager's Reports

GM17/06         Australasian Local Government Performance Excellence Program FY2016 Report......................................................................................................... 4

Notices of Motion Business Services

NOM17/07      Closure of Public Swimming Pools When School Carnivals Are Taking Place.......................................................................................................................... 9

Directorate Reports - Business Services

BS17/11          Monthly Financial Performance Report for the month ended 28 February 2017....................................................................................................... 10

BS17/12          Restoration of Financial Assistance Grants Indexation ............ 29

Directorate Reports - Sustainable Communities

SC17/16          Development Application No.0018/17 - Residential Flat Building (7 Units), Strata-Subdivision and Demolition of Existing Structures - Lot 3, Sec 48, DP 758258, 31 Camperdown Street, Coffs Harbour...................... 32

SC17/17          Draft MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan  ...................................... 196

SC17/18          Draft 2017-2021 Delivery Program, Draft 2017/18 Operational Plan, Draft Delivery Program Budgets and draft 2017/18 Fees and Charges 201

SC17/19          Rural Lands Strategy Update - Intensive Agriculture and Detached Dual Occupancies........................................................................................... 212

SC17/20          Planning Proposal to Rezone Land on Lots 371 & 372 DP 1026829 97 Pacific Street, Corindi Beach................................................................................... 251

Directorate Reports - Sustainable Infrastructure

SI17/08           Traffic Committee Process....................................................................... 301

SI17/09           Acquisition of Easement to Drain Water - 4 Beach Street and 5 Hastings Street, Woolgoolga..................................................................................... 304

Trust Reports

T17/08             TRUST REPORT - Update on Former Deep Sea Fishing Club Site.. 308

T17/09             TRUST REPORT - Relocation of Marine Rescue Woolgoolga to Arrawarra Headland Facility - Progress Report......................... 319   


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

NOM17/06   Supporting movements to ban single use plastic bags

Attachments:          Nil

 

Motion:

Councillor Townley has given notice of her intention to move the following:

"Move that Council supports the movement to ban single use plastic bags by:

1.    Writing to the State and Federal Governments urging them to introduce legislation that will ban single use plastic shopping bags.

2.    Contacting local retailers to encourage them to voluntarily reduce and ultimately eliminate single use plastic shopping bags from the Coffs Harbour LGA"

 

 

Rationale:

“Over the past decades, the number of high density polyethylene (HDPE) single use plastic bags has grown to the point that Australians are estimated to use 3.9 billion per year. Most of these bags are only used once and many enter the environment as litter.

 

Plastic pollution in the marine environment is recognized internationally as a serious and growing problem. Deaths of large numbers of marine animals, including turtles, dolphins and seabirds, are attributed to ingestion of plastics.

 

Many jurisdictions around the world have implemented plastic bag bans and in Australia, the ACT, NT, SA and Tasmanian governments have all introduced legislation to limit plastic bags.

 

CHCC can encourage similar legislation by writing to both NSW and Federal government to support such legislation.

 

In addition, Council can contact individual retailers encouraging them to reduce and eliminate single use bags. There are growing community groups who are taking active steps to reduce plastic shopping bag use and Council can support these initiatives.

 

Our coastline includes the Solitary Islands Marine Park and we should take all appropriate steps to reduce land-based pollution entering the park.”

Staff Comment:

At the present time, Council does not have a policy position in regard to this issue.

  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

GM17/06      Australasian Local Government Performance Excellence Program FY2016 Report

Author:                        Director Business Services

Authoriser:                  General Manager

Coffs Harbour 2030:   LC3 We have strong civic leadership and governance

Attachments:              ATT1  GM17/06  Australasian LG Performance Excellence Program FY16 - Coffs Harbour City Council Report  

 

Executive Summary

In 2013 PwC Australia and LG Professionals NSW worked in collaboration to create the Australasian LG Performance Excellence Program. The program uses PwC’s local government experience and analytics expertise to provide a local government sector based benchmarking approach. Participants now include 69 Councils in New South Wales, 30 Councils in New Zealand and 35 Councils in Western Australia.

 

Coffs Harbour City Council joined in 2016 at the beginning of the second three year period of the program. This was also timely as it provides 2015-16 as a base year of benchmarked data following the implementation of much of Council’s Transformation to Sustainability Program.

 

This report presents to Council the 2015-16 Performance Excellence Report for Coffs Harbour City Council. The results of the program will be used to inform areas of focus for Council’s workforce planning and continuous improvement initiatives moving forward.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council note the report.

 

Report

Description of Item:

In 2013 PwC Australia and LG Professionals NSW worked in collaboration to create the Australasian LG Performance Excellence Program. The program uses PwC’s local government experience and analytics expertise to provide a local government sector based benchmarking approach. Initially the program began with a pilot with 15 NSW councils across metropolitan, regional and rural areas. After further content reviews by PwC and LG Professionals NSW’s technical working group, the final program was released in 2014. It has rapidly expanded to 69 Councils in NSW and became available through partnerships with other associations, in NZ (30 Councils) and WA (35 Councils).

 

The program represents a contemporary industry-led system of council performance measurement that has been delivering results for participating councils for over four years. The program measures and provides councils strategic and operational insights into; corporate leadership, workforce management, finance management, operations management, risk management, asset management and service delivery. Using this information, each council receives an annual Performance Excellence Report (attached) along with direct access to the additional Comparative Analysis Tool enabling Councils to drill into the program’s data themselves. Uniquely, through the Comparative Analysis Tool participating councils can compare and benchmark their performance against the overall sample, pre identified sub-segments of the sample, new bespoke segments (as created by the council themselves), as well as all other individual identified participating councils in the sample.

 

Coffs Harbour City Council joined in 2016 at the beginning of the second three year period of the program. This was also timely as it provides 2015-16 as a base year of benchmarked data following the implementation of much of Council’s Transformation to Sustainability Program.

 

The results of the program will be used to inform areas of focus for Council’s workforce planning and continuous improvement initiatives moving forward.

Issues:

Highlights from the attached 2015-16 Performance Excellence Report for Coffs Harbour City Council are outlined under each report section heading as follows.  It is important to note that this represents the base year and in some cases the data requires further improvement. This will ensure increasing accuracy of data for the following years’ reports. Also, comparisons with other Councils always needs to be cognisant and understanding of differences that exist in each Council’s definitions and methods.

 

Workforce

·    FTE growth measures are not considered reliable as the previous year data (2014-15) was not prepared on the same basis.

·    Remuneration as a percentage of operating expenses is comparatively low; however, paid overtime and agency staff spend are relatively high.

·    Staff Turnover Rate of 15.4% compares well with median results, particular in light of Council’s change program. The proportion of staff that commenced in the last two years (the Rookie Rate) is also comparable.

·    Gender diversity results are mixed with good results in the team leader/middle management areas and less diversity at the very senior management and general staff levels.

·    Leave measures are comparable with the median results.

 

Finance

·    Council’s finance function activities data aggregates Transactional Efficiency and Compliance and Control, thus making it more difficult to compare to others.  This will be rectified in future surveys. However, the effort in the value-adding area of Business Insights is relatively high.

·    Most measures are comparable to the median results.

 

Operations

·    Customer service staffing is higher than the NSW median result; however, this may not take account of Council’s new front office staffing model where additional services are located within the Customer Services Group.

·    IT spend is higher than the NSW median result and reflects Council’s recent one-off larger than usual investment in IT systems.

·    Council’s outsourcing or sharing of corporate services is relatively low compared to others and presents opportunities once full costs are understood.

 

Service Delivery

·    Service costs for Sewerage and Solid Waste Management are particularly high in comparison to others. This is as expected given the relative newness of Council’s sewerage assets and the modern standards of compliance met, and the relevant contract arrangements for waste.

·    Service costs for Governance and Administration are lower in comparison to others.

·    Span of control benchmarks for some service areas (e.g. parks and gardens and sewerage services) seem unrealistic and warrants further review of the underlying data.

·    Staff turnover rate varies significantly by service area and warrants further review.

 

Risk Management

·    Results generally align with others.

 

Corporate Leadership

·    Median Council Meeting Duration and Median Council Resolutions Passed are both below the NSW survey population.

·    Results highlight that further work is required (and is being undertaken) in both staff and community engagement; however, community engagement through information sharing and customer satisfaction is comparable to other Councils.

 

Asset Management

·    Highlights that an Asset Management Maturity Rating Model and stronger linkage of the Strategic Asset Management Plan to the Long Term Financial Plan are both in development.

·    Highlights that Long Term Financial Plan delivers self-sustaining Council asset renewal.

Options:

As the report is provided only for noting no options analysis is provided.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no perceived current or future environmental impacts.

•     Social

There are no perceived current or future social impacts.

•     Civic Leadership

Participating in relevant benchmarking programs demonstrates Council’s openness and transparency to self-evaluation, accountability and comparison. The results of the program will be used to inform areas of focus for Council’s workforce planning and continuous improvement initiatives with the aim to deliver service improvement and/or efficiency for Council and the community.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

There are no direct broader economic impacts from this report.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Council’s participation in the program is funded through the Delivery Program / Operational Plan and costs $15,250 per annum for each of the three years 2015-16 to 2017-18.

Risk Analysis:

Publishing the 2015-16 Performance Excellence Report for Coffs Harbour City Council provides further transparency on Council’s operations and performance.  This information may be misused out of context and therefore may present some reputational risk for Council. However; being open and honest with the community enhances Council’s reputation.

Consultation:

Consultation has occurred with relevant officers of Council.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The following information and disclaimer is required by PwC to be published when the Performance Excellence Report is shared with third parties:

Sharing Results with Third Parties

This report has been provided to each participating council so that a participating council can understand how it compares to the aggregated findings and for no other purpose. The report is intended for the participating council recipient only.

This report, including all data and comparative insights contained in it, is confidential to PwC and the participating council. Except as set out below, the report should not be disclosed in whole or in part to another person unless agreed with PwC and the council.

As agreed in the survey agreement with the participating councils, each participating council is permitted to share the report with third parties as part of a council meeting, on a council website, or with other Participating Councils provided it is shared in its entirety and the following words are included with the report when the report is provided:

“The information, statements, statistics and commentary contained in this report are of a general nature and have been prepared from data provided by Participating Councils. The reliability, accuracy or completeness of this information has not been independently verified.

Accordingly, whilst the statements made in this report are given in good faith, no one should act on the basis of this report without obtaining specific advice and neither LG Professionals, NSW nor PwC accepts any responsibility for the consequences of any person’s use of or reliance on the report (in whole or in part) or any reference to it.”

Implementation Date / Priority:

The report is for noting only.  However, the results of the program will be used to inform areas of focus for Council’s workforce planning and continuous improvement initiatives moving forward.

Conclusion:

This report presents to Council the 2015-16 Performance Excellence Report for Coffs Harbour City Council for consideration and noting.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

NOM17/07   Closure of Public Swimming Pools When School Carnivals Are Taking Place

Attachments:          Nil

 

Motion:

Councillor Knight has given notice of her intention to move the following:

"1.     That Council REVERSE its decision to allow pool management and large schools to negotiate closing the Coffs Harbour War Memorial Olympic Pool to the public during school carnivals

2.       That Council require the pool be kept open to the public during school carnivals, but cordon off the area required by the school."

 

 

Rationale:

“In recent weeks, the Public Pool was closed to the general public for a large school’s swimming carnival.  This caused a lot of community upset and stress for pool staff as making pool closure ”negotiable” placed the pool lessee and staff open to criticism.  Closing the pool to the general public did nothing but create unnecessary angst within the community, and to reduce this, staff generally keep the pool open and cordoned off the areas required for the school carnival.”

Staff Comment:

When the Trust Report was prepared for the meeting on 28 April 2016 it was recommended that Council, as Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust:

 

1.    Continues to uphold the lease condition ensuring the public swimming pools in the Local Government Area remain available in a limited capacity, to the public when school swimming carnivals have been scheduled to take place.

2.    Ensures the new leases offered for future tenure continue to require the public swimming pools in the Local Government Area remain available to the public when hosting schools swimming carnivals.

3.    Ensures the new leases offered for future tenure require the lessees to hold and adhere to an appropriate child protection policy and general public protection policy.

 

Upon assessment after one year of the new policy it is considered that the recommendation provided previously still remains the best option for Council.

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

BS17/11       Monthly Financial Performance Report for the month ended 28 February 2017

Author:                        Section Leader Financial Planning

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

Coffs Harbour 2030:   LC3 We have strong civic leadership and governance

Attachments:              ATT1  BS17/11   Financial Performance Report for the Month Ended 28 February 2017  

 

Executive Summary

This report presents the monthly financial performance report for 28 February 2017.  The report provides information on the actual to budget position at the financial statement level and capital expenditure reports for the current financial year.  It also provides the consolidated financial position as at 28 February 2017.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Note the monthly financial performance report for 28 February 2017.

2.       Note the following Consolidated Income Statement.

 

CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENT as at 28 February 2017:

2016/17 Original Budget 

2016/17 Revised Budget  

2016/17 Actuals  

Recurrent Revenue

‘000s

‘000s

‘000s

Rates & Annual Charges

$90,789

$90,793

$91,165

User Charges & Fees

$29,097

$24,507

$13,236

Interest & Investment Revenue

$5,699

  $5,829

$4,835

Other Revenues

$8,561

$12,848

$9,176

Grants & Contributions provided for Operating Purposes

$21,641

$22,632

$10,992

 

 

 

 

RECURRENT REVENUE

$155,787

$156,609

$129,404

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Expenditure

 

 

 

Employee Benefits & Oncosts

$37,805

$37,768

$32,162

Borrowing Costs

$11,498

$11,498

$5,916

Materials & Contracts

$56,027

$61,097

$22,286

Depreciation & Amortisation

$44,767

$44,767

$29,845

 

 

 

 

2016/17 Original Budget 

2016/17 Revised Budget  

2016/17 Actuals  

Other Expenses

$12,236

$12,385

$4,734

 

 

 

 

RECURRENT EXPENDITURE

$162,333

$167,515

$94,943

 

 

 

 

NET OPERATING (DEFICIT) / SURPLUS

($6,546)

  ($10,906)

$34,461

 

 

 

 

Capital Revenue

 

 

 

Capital Grants, Subsidies, Contributions and Donations

$23,191

$31,475

$3,825

 

 

 

 

CAPITAL REVENUE

$23,191

$31,475

$3,825

 

 

 

 

NET SURPLUS

$16,645

$20,569

$38,286

 

Report

Description of Item:

The monthly financial performance report provides information on Council’s actual to budget performance.  The report has been introduced to provide accrual based information to Council on a monthly basis.  The reports include a graphical representation of key performance indicators in order to provide key summary financial information.  A statement of comprehensive income is included which details monthly performance for February 2017.  This statement compares actual to budget on a monthly and year to date basis at the financial statement level.  Also included are the capital expenditure reports for the current financial year.


 

CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENT as at 28 February 2017:

 

2016/17 Original Budget 

2016/17 Revised Budget  

2016/17 Actuals  

Recurrent Revenue

‘000s

‘000s

‘000s

Rates & Annual Charges

$90,789

$90,793

$91,165

User Charges & Fees

$29,097

$24,507

$13,236

Interest & Investment Revenue

$5,699

  $5,829

$4,835

Other Revenues

$8,561

$12,848

$9,176

Grants & Contributions provided for Operating Purposes

$21,641

$22,632

$10,992

 

 

 

 

RECURRENT REVENUE

$155,787

$156,609

$129,404

 

 

 

 

Recurrent Expenditure

 

 

 

Employee Benefits & Oncosts

$37,805

$37,768

$32,162

Borrowing Costs

$11,498

$11,498

$5,916

Materials & Contracts

$56,027

$61,097

$22,286

Depreciation & Amortisation

$44,767

$44,767

$29,845

Other Expenses

$12,236

$12,385

$4,734

 

 

 

 

RECURRENT EXPENDITURE

$162,333

$167,515

$94,943

 

 

 

 

NET OPERATING (DEFICIT) / SURPLUS

($6,546)

  ($10,906)

$34,461

 

 

 

 

Capital Revenue

 

 

 

Capital Grants, Subsidies, Contributions and Donations

$23,191

$31,475

$3,825

 

 

 

 

CAPITAL REVENUE

$23,191

$31,475

$3,825

 

 

 

 

NET SURPLUS

$16,645

$20,569

$38,286

 


 

Issues:

There is no obligation to provide monthly financial performance reports but as part of prudent financial management we have opted to do so.

Options:

An options analysis is not provided as this report is provided for noting only.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no perceived short or long term environmental impacts.

•     Social

There are no perceived short or long term social impacts.

•     Civic Leadership

Council supports the delivery of high quality, sustainable outcomes for Coffs Harbour and invests surplus funds to maximise investment income and preserve capital to assist with funding requirements for projects listed under the Coffs Harbour 2030 Community Strategic Plan.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

This report assesses the current year’s budget position only.  Any variations approved by Council are subsequently reflected in Council’s Delivery Plan and may affect future economic sustainability.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The year to date operating surplus before capital grants is estimated to be $34.461 million with the surplus after capital grants estimated to be $40.145 million as at 28 February 2017.

Risk Analysis:

Not applicable

Consultation:

Group Leaders and their relevant staff have been provided with electronic budget reports for each cost centre on a monthly basis for review. Variations adopted by Council have been incorporated into the report.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Local government regulations require the Responsible Accounting Officer to submit a quarterly budget review to Council.  There is no obligation to provide monthly financial performance reports but as part of prudent financial management we have opted to do so.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Not applicable.

Conclusion:

This monthly financial performance report provides information on the actual to budget results at the financial statement level along with capital expenditure reports for the current financial year. 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

BS17/12       Restoration of Financial Assistance Grants Indexation

Author:                        Director Business Services

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

Coffs Harbour 2030:   LC3 We have strong civic leadership and governance

Attachments:              Nil

 

Executive Summary

In the 2014-15 Budget, the federal government implemented significant cuts to financial assistance grants (FAGs).

 

The budget put a freeze on the indexation of FAGs over three years (2014-15 to 2016-17); i.e. FAGs are not increased in line with CPI and population increases. The loss of indexation over the three year period means FAGs are to stay at $2.287 billion per annum nationally until and including 2016-17. Over the forward estimates (2014-15 to 2017-18) a total of $925 million will be lost in FAGs nationally.

 

The FAGs approved for Coffs Harbour City Council for 2016-17 total $6,957,535. Over the period of the three year indexation freeze it is estimated that Council has foregone in the order of $780,000 in grant income.

 

This report provides Council information on the local government sector ‘endthefreeze’ campaign to restore the indexation of FAGs by the federal government in the upcoming 2017-18 budget. It is recommended that Council continues to support the local government sector ‘endthefreeze‘ campaign through media channels, including social media; and letters to federal MPs supporting the restoration of indexation for FAGs in the 2017-18 federal budget.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council continues to support the local government sector ‘endthefreeze‘ campaign through media channels, including social media; and letters to local federal MPs supporting the restoration of indexation for financial assistance grants (FAGs) in the 2017-18 federal government budget.

 

Report

Description of Item:

In the 2014-15 Budget, the federal government implemented significant cuts to financial assistance grants (FAGs).

 

The budget put a freeze on the indexation of FAGs over three years (2014-15 to 2016-17); i.e. FAGs are not increased in line with CPI and population increases. The loss of indexation over the three year period means FAGs are to stay at $2.287 billion per annum nationally until and including 2016-17. Over the forward estimates (2014-15 to 2017-18) a total of $925 million will be lost in FAGs nationally.

 

The impact will continue beyond the forward estimates as the base level of FAGs will be permanently reduced by more than 12%. In recent years, the value of FAGs has slipped to 0.7% of total federal taxation revenue (excluding GST). With the indexation freeze, this figure is to fall to 0.53% by 2017/18. The Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) and LGNSW advocate that FAGs be restored to a level equivalent to 1% of total federal taxation, the level they were at in 1996.

 

The freeze has had the heaviest impact on rural and regional councils which depend on federal grants for a large proportion of their income.

 

In NSW the FAGs indexation freeze will result in losses from forgone increase of approximately $287.7 million over the forward estimates ($29.9 million in 2014-15, $62.2 million in 2015-16, $95.8 million in 2016-17, and $99.8 million in 2017-18).

 

To date Coffs Harbour City Council has issued a media release (28 March 2017) and has placed posts on its social media sites supporting the campaign.

Issues:

ALGA and LGNSW are asking councils to support the ‘thunderclap’ phase of the campaign to end the freeze on financial assistance grants indexation in the May federal budget. ALGA is seeking to amplify its campaign to end the freeze on financial assistance grants (FAGs) indexation with a scheduled thunderclap message (Bringing the Thunder).

 

The first phase of the ALGA ‘endthefreeze’ campaign has generated a potent response from local government. Despite the campaign activity and ongoing advocacy, the federal government has not provided a firm guarantee that the indexation of FAGs will be restored from 2017-18 in the upcoming federal budget. Phase two of the ‘endthefreeze’ campaign encourages councils to increase pressure via their social media accounts.

 

With preparations for the 2017-18 federal budget well underway, it is critical and timely to remind the Australian Government of its commitments to local government. LGNSW urges councils to actively support this national campaign.

Options:

It is recommended that Coffs Harbour City Council continues to support the local government sector ‘endthefreeze‘ campaign through media channels, including social media; and letters to federal MPs supporting the restoration of indexation for FAGs in the 2017-18 federal budget.

 

Alternatively, Council may decide to take no further action.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no perceived current or future environmental impacts.

•     Social

There are no perceived current or future social impacts.

•     Civic Leadership

Participating in this local government sector campaign demonstrates to the community Council’s leadership by advocating for the area to receive fair treatment and grant income due from the federal government.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The freeze on the indexation of FAGs restricts a key traditional untied funding source, which is used by Council to advance objectives on behalf of its community as detailed in the Community Strategic Plan.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The FAGs approved for Coffs Harbour City Council for 2016-17 total $6,957,535. Over the period of the three year indexation freeze it is estimated that Council has foregone in the order of $780,000 in grant income.  This has compounded Council’s existing financial challenges caused by government policy through rate pegging and cost shifting. Restoring indexation will prevent further deterioration; however, the income already foregone will never be recovered and still has a compounding effect into the future.

Risk Analysis:

A core part of Council’s role is to advocate to other levels of government on behalf of its community and therefore there should be no risk in Council undertaking its legitimate role in this matter.

Consultation:

Consultation has been undertaken with relevant stakeholders in Council.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

FAGs are a fundamental grant income stream and method of distributing taxation revenue from federal government to local government. They are allocated through the State Grants Commission in accordance with the Local Government (Financial Assistance) Act 1995.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Council’s resolution on this matter will be enacted immediately and ongoing until the federal government budget is released in May.

Conclusion:

This report provides Council information on the local government sector ‘endthefreeze’ campaign to restore the indexation of FAGs by the federal government in the upcoming 2017-18 budget. It is recommended that Council continues its support of the campaign.

  


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

SC17/16       Development Application No.0018/17 - Residential Flat Building (7 Units), Strata-Subdivision and Demolition of Existing Structures - Lot 3, Sec 48, DP 758258, 31 Camperdown Street, Coffs Harbour

Author:                        Development Assessment Officer - Senior

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

Coffs Harbour 2030:   PL1 Our infrastructure and urban development is designed for sustainable living

Attachments:              ATT1  SC17/16   Development Application 0018/17 - Section 79C

ATT2  SC17/16   Development Application 0018/17 - Section 79C Attachment

ATT3  SC17/16   Development Application 0018/17 - Plans

ATT4  SC17/16   Development Application 0018/17 - Draft Conditions

ATT5  SC17/16   CONFIDENTIAL          Development Application 0018/17 - Submissions

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(e) of the Local Government Act as it contains information that would, if disclosed, prejudice the maintenance of law.

ATT6  SC17/16   Development Application 0018/17 - Open Access Submissions 

ATT7  SC17/16   Development Application 0018/17 - Submission from Applicant  

 

Executive Summary

This report provides an assessment of Development Application 0018/17 for a Residential Flat Building (7 units), Strata-subdivision and demolition of existing structures at Lot 3, Sec 48 DP 758258, 31 Camperdown Street, Coffs Harbour.

At its meeting of 22 August 2013, Council adopted Development Applications - Consideration by Council Policy which outlined:

That development applications for approval involving substantial aspects of the following elements be referred to Council for determination:

•        Significant public interest and community input;

•        Substantial non-compliance with relevant strategic controls;

•        Significant land use;

•        Major environmental issue(s).

The application was advertised and notified to adjoining land owners.  A number of public submissions were received in response to notification of the application. Accordingly, this matter was reported to Council at its 9 February 2017 meeting, where the following resolution was made:

“That the matter be deferred subject to further consultation between parties and those parties include Council, the applicants and residents”.

This report outlines what has occurred following this resolution and recommends that the application, as originally reported, be approved subject to a number of conditions.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Support the request to vary a development standard made pursuant to Clause 4.6 of Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2013 for the variation to the maximum building height under Clause 4.3(2) of Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2013 in this particular case.

2.       Approve Development Application No. 0018/17 for a Residential Flat Building (7 units),  Strata-subdivision and demolition of existing structures at Lot 3, Sec 48 DP 758258, 31 Camperdown Street, Coffs Harbour subject to the conditions in Attachment 4.

3.       Advise persons who made a submission on Development Application No. 0018/17 of Council’s decision.

 

Report

Description of Item:

·     The Site

The site is Lot 3, Sec 48 DP 758258, 31 Camperdown Street, Coffs Harbour.  The property fronts Camperdown Street and is bound by a lane to the west and existing residential development to the north and south. The site is approximately 771.4m2 in size and is regular in shape and slopes down to Camperdown Street.

The site currently accommodates existing residential development. The site is zoned R1 General Residential under the Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2013.

·     The Development

The proposed development involves:

-    Demolition of existing dwelling-house and associated structures;

-    Construction of seven units; and

-    Strata-subdivision.

The proposal includes five two bedroom units and two four bedroom units. The units range in size from 98.3m2 to 186m2. The seven units are spread over six levels, with the associated car parking accommodated on the upper ground floor.

All vehicle access is from the rear lane, adjoining the western boundary of the site. Two visitor parking spaces adjoin the lane. Pedestrian access is from Camperdown Street, via a pathway that runs along the northern boundary of the site to the common entry foyer area. Garbage from the development will be stored in an enclosed area adjoining the entry foyer and will also be collected from Camperdown Street. 

Issues:

The following key issues have been identified during the assessment process:

·    Context and Setting - Building Design

·    Traffic and Parking

·    Amenity (including potential view loss, solar access and privacy)

These assessment matters are discussed in detail in the attached section 79C evaluation.

Council considered Development Application 0018/17 at its meeting of the 9 February 2017, where the following resolution was made:

“That the matter be deferred subject to further consultation between parties and those parties include Council, the applicants and residents”.

Following this resolution Council staff wrote to the applicant seeking their feedback  in relation to whether they wished to address the key issues, as discussed in Council’s report being: context and setting building design; traffic and parking; and amenity (including potential view loss, solar access and privacy).

Following receipt of this correspondence the applicant engaged a consultant to assist with the further consultation required by the Council resolution. The applicant then organised a meeting with Council staff, where their intended actions in relation to further consultation were outlined.

Council has now received a formal response from the applicant, which is provided as Attachment 7 to this report. This response includes a letter from the applicant (including an overview of the development), a letter prepared by the applicant’s architect Mr Jason McCarthy, a statement prepared by the applicant’s consultant Mr Stephen Sawtell and a letter of support prepared by an adjoining landowner.

The response provides a record of actions undertaken by the applicant following the Council resolution and commentary in relation to the key issues discussed in Council’s original report. The response indicates that the applicant does not intend to make any amendments to the application and requests that the application be determined.

Options:

1.   Adopt the recommendation thereby granting consent to the application, subject to conditions.

2.   Reject the recommendation and list reasons for refusal to the application.

It is recommended that Council pursue option one, as outlined above.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

The proposed development is not expected to result in any unacceptable environmental impacts. A complete assessment of potential environmental impacts is provided in the S79C Assessment Report provided as Attachment 1 to this report.

•     Social

The development will provide additional land for housing in the area.  Conditions will be imposed to ensure that potential amenity impacts during construction are minimised.  It is considered that the development is unlikely to result in any significant adverse social impacts to the locality.

•     Civic Leadership

The proposed development is considered consistent with the aims and objectives of the Coffs Harbour 2030 Community Strategic Plan. In particular, it is considered that the development is consistent with Council's “Places for Living” relating to urban development and sustainable living.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The development will provide construction related employment opportunities during the construction phase and additional housing to the area on completion.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

There are no implications for Council’s Delivery Program/adopted Operational Plan.

Risk Analysis:

A risk analysis has been undertaken and it is considered that approval of the development application as recommended, does not pose a significant risk to Council.

Consultation:

The proposed development has been advertised and notified in accordance with the requirements of DCP 2015 for a period of 14 days and 42 submissions were received.

Of these, one submission was in support of the development, with the remaining 41 raising objections to the proposed development. Of the 41 objections, two were petitions and 11 were multiple submissions, where Council received the same or similar submission from the same person on more than one occasion.

The submissions received include both those submitted by residents surrounding the development and general Jetty locality, with a proportion of submissions also received from people residing outside of the locality.

A full copy of all of the submissions is a confidential attachment to this report (Attachment 5) as the submissions may contain personal or private information or other considerations against disclosure as prescribed under the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009.

As outlined above, following the Council resolution of 9 February 2017 Council staff wrote to the applicant seeking their feedback.

Following receipt of this correspondence the applicant engaged a consultant to assist with the further consultation required by the Council resolution. The applicant then organised a meeting with Council staff, where their intended actions in relation to further consultation were outlined.

From the applicant’s formal response to Council it is understood that the applicant’s consultant also entered into discussions with a representative for the adjoining landowners. Following these discussions the applicant wrote to Council outlining what has occurred in terms of consultation since the Council resolution.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

·    Section 79C Evaluation

Section 79C of the Environmental Planning and Assessment 1979, specifies the matters which a consent authority must consider when determining a development application.

A section 79C evaluation is provided as Attachment 1.

·    Relevant Statutory Instruments

The statutory instruments relevant to the development include the following:

-     Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2013

-     State Environmental Planning Policy No. 55 - Remediation of Land

-     State Environmental Planning Policy No.65 - Design Quality of Residential Flat Development

-     State Environmental Planning Policy No. 71 - Coastal Protection

-     State Environmental Planning Policy - Building Sustainability Index: BASIX 2004

-     Coffs Harbour Development Control Plan 2015

Each of these statutory instruments is considered in detail in the Section 79C assessment appended to this report.

Implementation Date / Priority:

In the event that Council adopts the recommendation, a formal notice of determination will be issued for the development application and persons who made a submission will be notified. A formal notice of determination is valid for five years and the applicant can act on the development consent at any time within that period, subject to complying with relevant conditions of the consent.

Conclusion:

This report demonstrates Council’s resolution of the 9 February 2017 has been achieved. Accordingly, this report provides an assessment of the application that has been undertaken in accordance with all statutory requirements and it is recommended that the application be approved subject to a number of conditions.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                                       27 April 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                                       27 April 2017


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 


 

PDF Creator


 


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                                       27 April 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                                       27 April 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

SC17/17       Draft MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan 

Author:                        Section Leader Community Planning & Performance

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

Coffs Harbour 2030:   LC3 We have strong civic leadership and governance

Attachments:              ATT1  SC17/17   Draft Coffs Harbour Community Strategic Plan  

 

Executive Summary

A suite of integrated planning and reporting documents have been prepared in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993 and the Office of Local Government’s Integrated Planning and Reporting framework. These documents include the Draft Community Strategic Plan.

The Community Strategic Plan (CSP) is the Coffs Harbour local government area community's aspirations for Coffs Harbour over the next 10 years expressed through a Community Vision, and a series of Objectives and Strategies. The Local Government Act (Sections 402 and 406) provides for the exhibition of the Draft Community Strategic Plan for a minimum period of 28 days prior to adoption.

 

Recommendation:

That Council resolve to place the Draft Community Strategic Plan on 28 day public exhibition pursuant to Sections 402 and 406 of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Report

Description of Item:

The Local Government Act (Sections 402 and 406) requires councils to prepare a long-term Community Strategic Plan (CSP) that covers a minimum of 10 years. In the year of local government elections, Councils are required to undertake a comprehensive review of their CSP which is to be completed by June 30 of the year following the elections.

The CSP is prepared by a Council on behalf of its community, and is required to cover a minimum of 10 years. It captures the long-term aspirations of the community. Other stakeholders need to contribute to deliver the long-term objectives of the CSP – for instance business, community groups and other tiers of government. As such, the CSP also takes account of NSW Government plans and strategies. The CSP is intended to represent the main priorities and aspirations of all stakeholders in the Coffs Harbour local government area and is not intended to cover only Council service and facility provision.

Community Engagement

As per legislation, Council adopted a Community Engagement Strategy on 9 June 2016 to identify the engagement approach to be used to review and develop the CSP. The Engagement Strategy identified relevant stakeholder groups within the community and outlined an engagement approach based on social justice principles of equity, access, participation and rights. It provided for a three phase approach and the engagement campaign was branded ‘MyCoffs’. The third phase of the engagement continues with the draft documents being approved for public exhibition.

Key promotional and engagement activities undertaken during the CSP review and development included:

·    Extensive outreach activities by staff at shopping centres, events and other public gatherings

·    An extensively planned and executed social media campaign 

·    Advertising and promotion via local press agencies

·    Targeted consultation with key stakeholders, community groups and business

·    Organised consultation events 

·    And, use of traditional marketing such as posters, flyers, bookmarks etc. 

Across all the engagement activities undertaken during the MyCoffs review campaign, approximately 6,000 people were engaged with face to face and direct feedback has been received from approximately 3,000 individual submissions.

Phase One, ‘Visioning’, occurred from September to November 2016 and captured information on what the community value and how the area could be improved. The feedback received included approximately 1,370 individual submissions.

Phase Two, ‘Priority Setting’, occurred from November 2016 to January 2017 and sought to achieve consensus regarding the priorities for the CSP. The feedback received included:

·    140 Big Picture community summit attendees

·    605 Big Issue surveys completed

·    342 youth surveys completed

·    23 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander surveys completed

Phase Three, ‘Refinement’, commenced in February 2017 and will conclude when the CSP is presented at the Council meeting of 22 June 2017 for adoption. Phase three seeks to confirm the content and emphasis of the CSP. The feedback received has so far included:

·    52 Focus Group attendees 

A more detailed summary of the engagement campaign can be viewed in Attachment 3 of the attached draft CSP. 

Issues:

The current Coffs Harbour CSP was developed in 2008/09. As stipulated by the Local Government Act requirements, there has been a comprehensive review to revitalise the content of a strategic document that is now nine years old. The feedback from the Coffs Harbour community has reaffirmed the significance of certain opportunities and challenges that were captured in the 2008 CSP but not surprisingly over such a period of time, new opportunities and challenges have also arisen.

The development of this Community Strategic Plan has allowed us to take a fresh look and develop a new contemporary community vision, and new objectives and strategies for the area based on the community feedback received.

The draft Community Vision for Coffs Harbour shared for consultation is:

Connected, Sustainable, Thriving.

The concept behind this Vision came from 17 ‘visioning’ exercises undertaken with stakeholders during the CSP review campaign and attempts to best reflect the feedback received. The feedback received included that it would be ideal if the vision is succinct and memorable.  

The CSP comprises 8 Objectives and 19 Strategies grouped around four themes:

- MyCoffs is COMMUNITY WELLBEING

- MyCoffs is COMMUNITY PROSPERITY 

- MyCoffs is A PLACE FOR COMMUNITY 

- MyCoffs has SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP

‘Community Wellbeing’ covers how we create a safe, healthy and caring community and how community members relate to each other. ‘A Place for Community’ covers sustaining our natural environment and aspirations for our built environment and neighbourhoods. ‘Community Prosperity’ covers business, tourism, education and training. ‘Sustainable Community Leadership’ covers public services and public infrastructure management, decision making, accountability and collaboration.

Many of the issues are interconnected and cannot be considered in isolation. For instance, housing affordability is a planning issue but also a social issue, transport planning cannot be discussed without considering land-use planning, housing and employment location, and health and well-being outcomes, and looking after our natural environment cannot be considered without consideration regarding the planning of our built environment. The draft CSP represents an integrated approach to long-term planning where the objectives support each other and work together to achieve the Community Vision.

Community Priorities

While every issue in the CSP can be considered of significance to the community, certain clear priorities emerged from the engagement. A variety of engagement techniques each highlighted that the community places greater significance in prioritising some issues over others, and these issues were continually reinforced across the whole engagement process. These issues were:

·    A Pacific Highway bypass for Coffs Harbour

·    Sustaining our natural environment

·    The effective planning, design and management of public spaces and neighbourhoods

While Council may not exercise direct control over all aspects of these issues, they are the issues of importance to our community and Council will need to consider how to best collaborate with other stakeholders to make a positive impact over the longer-term.

Options:

1.       Adopt the draft CSP for public exhibition.

2.       Council may amend the draft CSP prior to adoption for public exhibition.

3.       Council may reject adoption of the draft CSP for public exhibition. Selection of this option means that Council would be unable to undertake future public exhibition of a draft CSP and still meet the legislated adoption timeframes in contravention of the Local Government Act.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

The CSP provides details of the key objectives and strategies prioritised by the Coffs Harbour LGA community with regards to environmental issues.

•     Social

The CSP provides details of the key objectives and strategies prioritised by the Coffs Harbour LGA community with regards to social issues.

•     Civic Leadership

The CSP demonstrates Council’s commitment to inclusivity and openness with regards to community engagement and collaborative planning for the future.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The CSP will assist in enabling Council to effectively plan for the resourcing of future service delivery based on community priorities, and provide the criteria for Council and other stakeholders to leverage grant funding and partnership opportunities to address the CSP.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The review of the CSP will both be informed by and help to inform Council’s Delivery Program 2017-2021. The CSP will also shape the details of the specific actions that Council will undertake in 2017/18 to achieve the strategies and objectives in the CSP and this will be captured in Council’s 2017/18 Operational Plan. 

Risk Analysis:

The preparation of the CSP is a legislative requirement.

Consultation:

Internal consultation was undertaken with all relevant staff. External consultation was, and shall continue to be undertaken, as per the adopted CSP Review - Community Engagement Strategy.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The Local Government Act (Sections 402 and 406).

Implementation Date / Priority:

The draft CSP would be placed on exhibition for 28 days from 1 May 2017. Following the exhibition and consideration of the submissions, the CSP will be re-submitted to Council for adoption on 22 June 2017.

Conclusion:

It is recommended that Council adopt the draft CSP for public exhibition.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

SC17/18       Draft 2017-2021 Delivery Program, Draft 2017/18 Operational Plan, Draft Delivery Program Budgets and draft 2017/18 Fees and Charges

Author:                        Senior Corporate Planner

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

Coffs Harbour 2030:   LC3 We have strong civic leadership and governance

Attachments:              ATT1  SC17/18   Draft 2017-2021 Delivery Program

ATT2  SC17/18   Draft 2017/18 Operational Plan

ATT3  SC17/18   Draft Delivery Program Budgets 2017-2021

ATT4  SC17/18   Draft 2017/18 Fees and Charges  

 

Executive Summary

Council is required to prepare and adopt a Delivery Program (to cover a four-year period) and an Operational Plan for each financial year. These documents detail the principal activities and budgets that Council proposes to pursue to help implement the strategies and achieve the objectives set out in the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan for the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area (LGA).

The Draft 2017-2021 Delivery Program and Draft 2017/18 Operational Plan are presented at this time for consideration. The documents incorporate Council’s Draft Division Budgets 2017-2021; and Draft Fees and Charges 2017/18 and have been significantly informed by an ongoing review of the Resourcing Strategy that addresses long-term financial, asset and workforce management.

The draft budget incorporates the ‘rate-pegging’ allowance of 1.5% approved for 2017/18 as well as a Council-imposed freeze on increases in water and sewer fees and charges. The 2017/18 budget result forecasts an estimated underlying deficit, that is; before capital revenue, of $7.248 million. This is comprised of estimated results of $0.1 million surplus for the General Fund, $2.735 million deficit for the Water Fund and $4.618 million deficit for the Sewer Fund.

This report recommends that the draft documents be placed on public exhibition for community feedback.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.   Resolve to place the following documents on public exhibition:

1.1.    Draft 2017-2021 Delivery Program;

1.2.    Draft 2017/18 Operational Plan;

1.3.    Draft Delivery Program Budgets 2017-2021; and

1.4.    Draft Fees and Charges 2017/18.

2.       Note that the draft documents will be placed on public exhibition for a 28-day period from Monday, 1 May until close of business on Monday, 29 May 2017, and that the community will be encouraged to provide feedback on the documents during that time.

3.       Consider community submissions prior to adopting the final Delivery Program, Operational Plan, Delivery Program Budgets and Fees and Charges documents by 30 June 2017.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Under the Integrated Planning and Reporting (IPR) provisions of the Local Government Act, Council is required to prepare a four-year Delivery Program outlining the activities it will pursue to help achieve the objectives of the Community Strategic Plan. A subsidiary of the Delivery Program is the Operational Plan, which details the actions to be undertaken in a single financial year. They are supported by four-year Budgets and a one-year schedule of Council Fees and Charges. The IPR documents are informed by Council’s long-term Resourcing Strategy.

Council is required to seek community feedback on its Draft Delivery Program, Operational Plan, Budgets and Fees and Charges by way of a minimum 28-day public exhibition period. After considering community submissions, Council is required to adopt the final suite of IPR documents by 30 June each year.

Issues:

·     Draft Delivery Program and Draft Operational Plan

Each year, Council reviews its operations to ensure the organisation remains positioned to help implement Coffs Harbour’s Community Strategic Plan. The activities that Council has nominated to undertake in its draft 2017-2021 Delivery Program and 2017/18 Operational Plan are intended to help fulfil the objectives of the MyCoffs Plan. Over time it will take many agencies and stakeholders (including the community itself) to turn the Community Strategic Plan into reality. Council is committed to making a substantial contribution to that process.

The Delivery Program is a four-year blueprint for Council; all of the organisation’s plans, projects, actions and funding allocations are directly linked to the Delivery Program. The Operational Plan is a subsidiary of the Delivery Program, identifying the business of Council - through the provision of services - during the 2017/18 financial year.

The Delivery Program and Operational Plan are set out according to Council’s organisational structure. The activities of Council are aligned with at least one of the objectives of the MyCoffs Plan. Updates on the projects, ongoing activities and metrics provide the foundation for Council’s operational, six-monthly and annual reporting framework.

·     Resourcing Strategy

The Resourcing Strategy incorporates a Long Term Financial Plan, an Asset Management Strategy and a Workforce Plan. The Resourcing Strategy has been reviewed ahead of the development of the draft Delivery Program to support and reflect Council’s ongoing strategy to deliver outcomes on a sustainable basis. The revised Resourcing Strategy will be presented with the final suite of IPR documents for adoption by Council prior to 30 June 2017.

·     Significant Expenditure 2017/18

The ongoing injection of funding from the Financial Sustainability Special Rate Variation (2014/15 to 2016/17) will increase allocations in 2017/18 for a range of asset needs including road rehabilitation works (an additional $2,062,504), building renewals (an extra $1,559,828), other transport asset works (an additional $607,377) and Open Space works (an extra $1,844,907).

·     Budget Impact on Ratepayers

­    Impact on Residential Ratepayers

In November 2016, IPART set a 1.5% rate peg increase in ‘General Income’ for 2017/18. In accordance with the February 2015 Council Resolution  to implement a three-year price freeze on water and sewer annual charges to 2017/18, the ‘average’ residential property can expect a total rates and charges increase (including annual and usage charges) of approximately $52.55 per annum (or $1.01 per week), which is an approximate 1.5% overall increase from 2016/17.

The following table shows the impact on the total rates and charges payable for the ‘average’ residential property in 2017/18 with the rate peg and water and sewer charges freeze in place.

Residential Rate Impacts for the ‘Average’ Residential Property with Rate Peg Increases (Based on a land valuation of $204,800).

Rates and Charges

2016/17

2017/18

Increase

($)

($)

Amount ($)

%

Residential Ordinary Rate

1,168.72

1,190.57

21.85

1.9%

Environmental Levy

41.26

41.96

0.70

1.7%

Sewerage Access Charge

806.00

806.00

0.00

0.0%

Water Access Charge

143.00

143.00

0.00

0.0%

Water Usage (250 KL pa)

677.50

697.50

20.00

3.0%

Domestic Waste Service

636.00

646.00

10.00

1.6%

Stormwater Management

25.00

25.00

0.00

0.0%

Totals

3,497.48

3,550.03

52.55

1.5%

Increase per Week

 

 

1.01

 

The Rate Peg % does not apply to Sewer, Water, Waste or Stormwater charges. Water charges include 250 KL of water usage for a year.

·     2017-2021 Financial Estimates

The financial estimates for the four years have been prepared in considerable detail, i.e. the same detail as the draft 2017/18 Budget.  These estimates will be included in Council’s Long Term Financial Plan which will be presented to Council as part of the Resourcing Strategy and will be in line with the fit for the future improvement proposal.

The 2017/18 budget result forecasts an estimated underlying deficit, that is; before capital revenue, of $7.248 million. This is comprised of estimated results of $0.1 million surplus for the General Fund, $2.735 million deficit for the Water Fund and $4.618 million deficit for the Sewer Fund.  A review of the financial estimates for each fund over the four years is as follows:

­    General Fund

The draft four year financial estimates for Council’s General Fund project the following accrual results:

Year

Financial Estimate

 

Financial Estimate before Capital Revenue

 

2017/18

$18,120,000

Surplus

$105,000

Surplus

2018/19

$10,454,000

Surplus

$382,000

Surplus

2019/20

$10,830,000

Surplus

$455,000

Surplus

2020/21

$10,546,000

Surplus

($453,000)

Deficit

Operational incomes and expenditures are tightly budgeted and have been subject to constant scrutiny in recent years.

There are significant capital works planned which are funded from rate variations, trading operations, grants, loans, S94 contributions, reserves, etc.

Council's revenues are gradually increasing to meet appropriate expenditure levels in relation to operations, particularly infrastructure maintenance, asset renewals and capital works. 

­    Water and Sewerage Funds

Both the Water and Sewerage Funds have undertaken massive programs of capital works in recent years. Expenditure has been in excess of $300m.  These works have been essential to maintain the viability of our city.

This unprecedented program has been funded by a combination of loan funds, developer contributions, reserve funds and grants. Loan funds have been the major source, with $221m borrowed.

Water and Sewerage charges have been held to reasonable increases in recent years, despite the large increase in loan repayments.  This has been achieved by using the cash reserves of each fund to meet annual budgeted deficits.  Details of the accrual results are set out below:

­    Water Fund

Year

Financial Estimate

 

 

Financial Estimate before Capital Revenue

 

2017/18

$1,067,000

Surplus

($2,735,000)

Deficit

2018/19

$1,815,000

Surplus

($2,101,000)

Deficit

2019/20

$2,048,000

Surplus

($1,318,000)

Deficit

2020/21

$2,144,000

Surplus

($472,000)

Deficit

 

­    Sewer Fund

Year

Financial Estimate

 

 

Financial Estimate before Capital Revenue

 

2017/18

($658,000)

Deficit

($4,618,000)

Deficit

2018/19

$978,000

Surplus

($2,975,000)

Deficit

2019/20

$2,082,000

Surplus

$850,000

Surplus

2020/21

$3,477,000

Surplus

$2,627,000

Surplus

The decrease in deficits is achieved primarily due to reducing loan repayments but also due to growth in assessments and increased developer contributions.

With the price freeze in water and sewer annual charges for the next year (to mitigate the immediate impacts of the 2015/16 and 2016/17 Special Rate Variation), the overall increase in annual rate bills will be limited to no more than approximately 1.5% for the average urban ratepayer.

·     Pensioner Rebates

Council will write off about $3m in pensioner rates and charges in 2017/18. Of this, Council voluntarily forgoes approximately $600,000. Council is required to forgo the remaining $2.4m under State Government legislation.

The amount Council is reimbursed by the State is approximately $1.39m, leaving an overall cost to Council of approximately $1.61m.

·     Environmental Levy for 2016/17

The Environmental Levy (being a Special Rate) is calculated with a ‘base amount’ to raise approximately 49% of the levy with the balance raised as an ad valorem rate applied to land values. The purpose of the Environmental Levy is to fund environmental works, and it is levied on all rateable land.

·     Proposed Loan Borrowings for 2017/18

A loan of $4.72m will be sought to augment grant and reserve funding for the C.ex International Stadium - EPIC Stadium upgrade works (Project total: $13,440,000)

·     Draft 2017/18 Fees & Charges

Council’s fees and charges have increased by approximately 3%, reflecting increases in staff delivery and administrative costs. The full Draft Fees and Charges 2017/18 document is available as Attachment 4.

Options:

This report aims to facilitate the structured roll-out of Council programs over the next four years, as well as enabling compliance with legislative requirements. At this time, the following options are available to Council:

1.    Adopt the recommendation provided to Council; this will enable the draft documents to be placed on public exhibition according to schedule, with the consideration of submissions and adoption of final documents to follow within the legislated timeframe.

2.    Amend the recommendation provided to Council; depending on the nature of the amendment this may impact on the structure and content of the documents and Council’s ability to finalise the budget planning process according to the set timeframe.

3.    Reject the recommendation provided to Council; this will impact on Council’s ability to finalise the budget planning process according to schedule. Failure to adopt and exhibit draft Delivery Program, Operational Plan, Budget, and Fees and Charges documents would represent a breach of the Local Government Act.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

There are no environmental impacts associated with the preparation or content of this report; however, the draft documents provide a foundation to support the maintenance and enhancement of Council programs to protect the Coffs Harbour LGA environment.

•     Social

The public exhibition process will assist community engagement in the finalisation of the Delivery Program and Operational Plan. Consistent with the Draft MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan, the draft documents include a range of strategies to enhance the social development of the Coffs Harbour LGA.

•     Civic Leadership

The documents are key components of the Integrated Planning and Reporting framework which enables Council to identify and respond to community aspirations and co-ordinate the provision of appropriate works and services to help achieve the city’s strategic objectives. The documents have been informed by the Draft MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The draft documents incorporate budgetary projections based on the approved 1.5% ‘rate peg’ allowance for 2017/18 as well as concessions on other rates and charges to help mitigate the financial impact of the Financial Sustainability Special Rate Variation (2014/15 to 2016/17) on ratepayers. The additional costs that ratepayers will face in 2017/18 have been kept to a minimum. As always, cost implications have to be balanced against the positive economic impact of maintaining and enhancing Council programs and services across the local government area.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The development and implementation of the Delivery Program, Operational Plan, Budgets and Fees and Charges documents are accommodated within Council’s budget structure. This expenditure is monitored through Council’s monthly and quarterly budget reviews.

Risk Analysis:

The preparation of Delivery Program, Operational Plan, Budgets and Fees and Charges documents is a legislative requirement.

Consultation:

During the year, Councillors and staff have reviewed Council’s strategic priorities and resourcing options to assist with the development of the Draft 2017-202 Delivery Program and Draft 2017/18 Operational Plan. The review of Coffs Harbour’s Community Strategic Plan has also informed this process.

Community requests made during the year for specific works or services have been considered in the framing of the draft Delivery Program Budgets; this process will be continued with the receipt of budget submissions during public exhibition.

Public Exhibition

Community engagement is a central part of the IPR framework. This report recommends the draft documents be adopted and placed on public exhibition for a 28-day period from Monday, 1 May until close of business on Monday, 29 May 2017.

Public engagement during this period will include public information and website displays, media releases, and newspaper advertising. The engagement process will encourage the community to consider the draft documents and make submissions to Council on issues of interest and concern.

Community submissions, a summary of recommended responses to submissions, and a final suite of IPR documents will be presented for adoption by Council prior to 30 June 2017.

Following Ministerial determination, the final documents will be posted on Council’s website (it is anticipated that this will take place by 30 June 2017). Where hard copies are required, the documents will be printed and distributed in July 2017.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Council implemented the Integrated Planning and Reporting framework on 1 July 2010. Each year since then Council has considered a Draft Delivery Program and Draft Operational Plan (including budgets and fees and charges documents).

Sections 404 and 405 of the Local Government Act 1993 detail requirements in relation to a council’s Delivery Program and Operational Plan.

Additional requirements for the Operational Plan are set out in Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 – Clause 201 (relating to the content of Council’s annual statement of revenue policy) and Clause 203 (relating to reporting requirements for budget review statements and estimates revisions).

Section 508 of the Local Government Act 1993 details provisions relating to Special Rate Variations.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Subject to Council approval, the draft documents will be placed on public exhibition for a 28-day period from Monday 1 May until close of business on Monday 29 May 2017.

Conclusion:

It is recommended that Council adopt the Draft 2017-2021 Delivery Program and supporting documents at this time.

The draft documents represent a considered and responsible strategy that will enable Council to continue to meet the needs of the Coffs Harbour LGA community while securing the financial sustainability of the organisation.

Adoption of the draft documents by Council will allow their release for public exhibition to provide community engagement surrounding Council’s forward planning.

Adopting the drafts is also in line with the timeframes and legislative requirements set out in the Integrated Planning and Reporting provisions of the Local Government Act.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

SC17/19       Rural Lands Strategy Update - Intensive Agriculture and Detached Dual Occupancies

Author:                        Senior Planner / Urban Designer

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

Coffs Harbour 2030:   LP2 We have a strong and diverse economy

Attachments:              ATT1  SC17/19   Rural Lands Strategy Issues and Options Paper 2017

ATT2  SC17/19   CONFIDENTIAL          AAC Community Representative Nominations - Assessment

Confidential in accordance with Section 10A(2)(e) of the Local Government Act as it contains information that would, if disclosed, prejudice the maintenance of law.  

 

Executive Summary

At the meeting of 24 November 2016, Council resolved to commence Phase 2 of the Rural Lands Strategy (RLS) Component of the Local Growth Management Strategy (LGMS) and appoint a Section 355 Agricultural Advisory Committee (AAC). Nominations have been received from the community for inclusion on the AAC. This report recommends the engagement of three (3) community members to the AAC. Council is also required to nominate two Councillors to the committee as per the Terms of Reference for the Section 355 AAC.

At the meeting of 23 March 2017, Council resolved (NOM17/05) to bring back a report reflecting the issues associated with intensive agriculture within the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area (LGA); while awaiting the completion of the RLS. The issue of intensive agriculture is captured within the final LGMS Rural Lands Issues and Options Paper 2017 (Attachment 1).

At the meeting of 23 March 2017, Council also resolved (2017/47) to undertake a partial review of Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 2013 and Development Control Plan 2015 as a matter of urgency with a view to possible inclusion of detached dual occupancies in the ‘permitted with consent’ part of the Land Use Table in the RU2 Rural Landscape Zone of the LEP. No additional budget was provided within the resolution to allow this work to be completed.

This report aims to provide an update on how best to deliver the RLS Component of the LGMS while expediting a review of the permissibilities for detached dual occupancies in the RU2 Rural Landscape Zone; within the confines of business as usual and limited budget and staffing for the Local Planning Section. Accordingly, this report recommends a budget commitment of $35,000 in the 2017/18 financial year to allow the detached dual occupancies Planning Proposal to be undertaken by a consultant as a separate item to the RLS, beginning from the 1 July 2017.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Appoint the following community representatives to the Section 355 Agricultural Advisory Committee and advise all applicants of Council’s resolution:

1.1.    Scott Wolgamott

1.2.    Gurmesh Singh; and

1.3.    Leigh Priestley.

2.       Nominate two Councillors to the Section 355 Agricultural Advisory Committee.

3.       Note the contents of the Coffs Harbour City Council Local Growth Management Strategy Rural Lands Issues and Options Paper 2017 (Attachment 1).

4.       Allocate $35,000 in funding in the 2017/18 final budget and delivery program to allow the detached dual occupancies Planning Proposal to be undertaken by a consultant from 1 July 2017.

 

Report

Description of Item:

At the Ordinary Council meeting of 24 November 2016, Council received an update and next steps report for the RLS Component of the LGMS. At that meeting it was resolved that Council:

1.  Note the findings of the public exhibition of the Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy Phase 1 Draft Issues and Options Paper, Background Report and Community Workshop Outcomes (Attachment 1).

2.  Undertake a procurement process to select appropriately qualified consultants to prepare Phase 2 – Draft Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy in accordance with the Project Scope (Attachment 3).

3.  Establish a Section 355 Agricultural Advisory Committee in accordance with the attached Terms of Reference (Attachment 4).

In response to resolution 2, a preferred consultant has been identified (via Council’s procurement process) to complete the RLS Component and is discussed in the Issues Section of this report. In response to resolution 3, community representatives have nominated for the AAC and the shortlisted nominees are also discussed in the Issues Section of this report.

At the Ordinary meeting of 23 March 2017, a Notice of Motion (NOM 17/05) was brought regarding intensive agriculture in rural lands. At that meeting it was resolved:

1.  That Council await the completion of the Rural Lands Strategy component of the local growth management strategy review.

2.  That the motion of 24 November 2016 S355 Agricultural Advisory Committee be allowed to discuss matters established so that State government agencies, community members and stakeholders be allowed to have consultation and recommendations appropriately.

3.  That staff bring back a report reflecting the issues associated with intensive agriculture in the Coffs Harbour local government area.

Council was provided with a copy of the Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy Phase 1 - Draft Issues and Options Discussion Paper 2016 and associated Background Report and Community Workshop Outcomes at the meeting of 24 November 2016. In response to NOM 17/05 resolution 3, the draft paper has been refined with feedback received from the community; along with information outlined in the Coffs Harbour State of the Environment Report; both as reported to Council on 24 November 2016. It also captures contents of a submission presented to the 23 March 2017 Council meeting regarding the Korora – West Sapphire – Moonee Large Lot Residential Investigation Area. The final document is now presented to Council as the Coffs Harbour City Council Local Growth Management Strategy Rural Lands Issues and Options Paper 2017 (Attachment 1), for noting by Council. The issues associated with intensive agriculture in the Coffs Harbour LGA are outlined in that report.

At the Ordinary meeting of 23 March 2017, Council also considered a report regarding the Korora – West Sapphire – Moonee Large Lot Residential Investigation Area. At that meeting it was resolved that Council:

1.  Note the findings of the Korora – West Sapphire – Moonee Large Lot Residential Investigation Area: Environmental Studies March 2017 (Attachment 1), in respect to the Maccues Road, Wakelands Road/Fairview Road/Sugarmill Road, and Gaudrons Road/The Mountain Way precincts undertake a partial review of Coffs LEP 2013 and any relevant Development Control Plans as a matter of urgency with a view to possible inclusion of detached dual occupancies in the land use table in the RU2 Rural Landscape Zone under the list of uses that are permissible with consent.

2.  Immediately make the studies undertaken (Attachment 1 relating to this report) available to landowners free of charge, to utilize if they elect to submit a planning proposal as individual landholders, or on a precinct basis.

3.  Staff meet with the Planner representing owners in the WEST SAPPHIRE-MOONEE LARGE LOT RESIDENTIAL INVESTIGATION AREA and prepare a joint report clearly stating the matters they agree and articulating upon any elements of disagreement. With points of disagreement, the report to give concise reasons for any disagreement. If the authors can agree on a recommended suitable framework for the orderly release of large lot residential development, that framework is to be set out in the joint report.

In response to item 1 above (in bold), this will necessitate preparation of a Planning Proposal and background information, as outlined in the Issues Section of this report. This report does not address items 2 or 3 of that resolution.

Issues:

·    Consultant Engagement

In accordance with Council’s procurement policy, a number of planning consultants with relevant previous experience were invited to lodge a submission to prepare the RLS Component of the LGMS Review.  A preferred consultant has been identified. The engagement of this consultant has been delayed pending the outcome of this report.

·    S355 Agricultural Advisory Committee Community Representative Engagement

Council advertised for expressions of interest for community representatives to the Section 355 AAC between 1 February and 1 March 2017, in accordance with the adopted Terms of Reference (which allows for the appointment of 3 community representatives). A total of 6 submissions were received and a selection process was undertaken. The selection process is outlined within a confidential attachment (Attachment 2) to this report. This report recommends that the appointed representatives are:

-      Scott Wolgamott

-      Gurmesh Singh; and

-      Leigh Priestley.

This report further recommends that all applicants be advised of Council’s appointment.

·    S355 Agricultural Advisory Committee Councillor Nominations

Council is required to have two Councillor representatives on the Section 355 AAC as per its Terms of Reference. Accordingly, this report recommends for the nomination of two Councillors to the Section 355 AAC.

·    Report Outlining the Issues Associated with Intensive Agriculture

Council was provided with a copy of the Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Strategy Phase 1 - Draft Issues and Options Discussion Paper 2016 and associated Background Report and Community Workshop Outcomes at the meeting of 24 November 2016. At that meeting, Council was also provided with a list of submissions from nine (9) government agencies/authorities and twenty two (22) landowners/residents. The key issues raised within submissions relating to rural lands in general and intensive agriculture specifically included:

-      adverse impacts on waterways;

-      illegal water usage/dam construction;

-      the need for a development application and/or regulations for horticultural activities;

-      the need for buffers to resolve land use conflicts;

-      adverse visual impacts of netting;

-      illegal clearing;

-      general degradation of rural areas;

-      right to subdivide/reduction in minimum lot size;

-      need for better weed control/management;

-      depreciation in land values;

-      permissibility of secondary dwellings;

-      more areas zoned for large lot residential;

-      tax and rates incentives;

-      the abolition of the need for dual consents for vegetation removal; and

-      health impacts of chemical usage.

The Issues and Options Paper has been refined as a result of these submissions and is now presented to Council as the Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Issues and Options Paper 2017, for noting by Council (Attachment 1).  The issues associated with intensive agriculture in the Coffs Harbour LGA can be generally summarised as rural land use conflict, between agriculture (particularly intensive agriculture) undertaken in proximity to lands used for ‘rural living’ purposes. Farming is of significant importance to the local economy - 81% of Australia’s blueberry production emanates from the Coffs Harbour LGA and 10% of rural lands in the LGA are used for horticulture (bananas and berries). A total of 73% of rural lands in the LGA are used for rural living and large lot residential (rural residential) purposes (where residents gain little or none of their income from agriculture and rely on an off farm source).

·    Budget and Resourcing

At the meeting of 23 March 2017, Council resolved (2017/47) to undertake a partial review of Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 2013 and Development Control Plan 2015 as a matter of urgency with a view to possible inclusion of detached dual occupancies in the ‘permitted with consent’ part of the Land Use Table in the RU2 Rural Landscape Zone of the LEP. No additional budget was provided within the resolution to allow this work to be completed.

This report aims to provide an update on how best to deliver the RLS Component of the LGMS while expediting a review of the permissibilities for detached dual occupancies in the RU2 Rural Landscape Zone in the context of business of usual for the Local Planning Section. These additional requests place strain on current resources. Therefore, the only way to commence an additional project is to commit $35,000 in Council funds in the 2017/18 final budget and 2017/18 delivery program to allow for the engagement of a consultant to prepare a Planning Proposal for Gateway Determination

It should be noted the proposed $35,000 budget allocation will only allow for the Planning Proposal to proceed to a Gateway Determination to the Department of Planning and Environment (DPE). The DPE may require Council to undertake further studies and analysis which would be subject to a budget variation in 2017/18.

·    Implications for infrastructure in the RU2 Zone

The permissibility of detached dual occupancies in the RU2 Rural Landscape Zone could have impacts on rural communities due to increases in traffic generation; the expectation for improvements for infrastructure and services such as roads and garbage collection; and population growth. Other councils have clauses that allow for detached dual occupancies subject to certain criteria being met, this is further outlined in pages 10 and 11 in Attachment 1.

Options:

Council has two options to progress this matter:

1.   Adopt the recommendation. This would commit $35.000 in Council funds from the 2017/18 final budget and delivery program for the additional project. This would endorse the commencement of Phase 2 of the LGMS Rural Lands Strategy Component, and concurrent commencement of the detached dual occupancies in the RU2 Rural Landscape Zone body of work.

2.   Reject the recommendation. This would not allow for the resolution to be achieved due to budget and staffing limitations.

It is recommended to proceed with option 1.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Development of the RLS as well as the detached dual occupancies in rural zones body of work will further address environmental issues currently being experienced within rural areas of the LGA. This reflects Council’s long term strategic vision for the City as endorsed in the Our Living City (OLC) Settlement Strategy and Coffs Harbour 2030 Plan.

•     Social

Social impacts associated with living in rural communities have already been highlighted in Phase 1 of the RLS. These will be further interrogated in Phase 2 of this project and are also reflected in Council’s long term strategic vision for the City as endorsed in the existing LGMS and Coffs Harbour 2030 Plan. The permissibility of detached dual occupancies in the rural zones could have significant impacts on rural communities due to increases in traffic generation, the expectation for improvements infrastructure and services such as roads, garbage collection, etc, and population growth.

•     Civic Leadership

Over the course of Phase 1 of the RLS, Council and its consultants worked closely with the community, stakeholders, government authorities, landowners and the development industry to better understand the issues relating to rural land uses. A comprehensive community engagement framework will continue into Phase 2 of this project as well as during the development of a Planning Proposal to allow detached dual occupancies in the rural zones.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The RLS Component of the LGMS seeks to develop a holistic framework for balanced planning and management of rural land. It aims to provide flexibility but also certainty about how future development of rural land will impact on the amenity and character of rural lands throughout the LGA. Further, it will endeavour to facilitate a productive and economically sustainable long-term future for rural lands within the LGA. The development of a body of work and potential Planning Proposal to allow detached dual occupancies in the RU2 Rural Landscape Zone will potentially provide an additional income stream for rural land owners, address the issue of affordable housing and provide another option in housing choice in a rural setting. This needs to be assessed and balanced against the potential for significant impacts on rural communities due to increases in traffic generation, and increasing expectations for improvements to infrastructure and services such as roads, garbage collection.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Council’s 2016/17 Operational Plan contains funds to complete Phase 2 of the RLS. A consultant has been chosen through the procurement process but has not yet been engaged pending the outcome of this report. There are, however, no funds allocated to prepare the Planning Proposal which will allow detached dual occupancies in the rural zones with development consent. This report has attempted to find a mechanism to deliver both projects.

Risk Analysis:

Council does not have a current Rural Lands Strategy Component in place within the existing LGMS for the LGA. Without this Strategy, it is difficult to deliver an integrated strategic policy for rural lands development throughout the LGA. Council has previously been subjected to court action associated with its planning controls in rural areas.

The completion of the RLS will form part of the LGMS Review, which may provide recommendations for amendments to planning controls to ensure greater certainty to the rural sector and the community alike. This is considered an important component of Coffs Harbour’s growth, employment and income generation. The management of this project via a phased step process is a means to minimise risk to Council.

The resolution of Council at its meeting of 23 February 2017 (requiring the preparation of a body of work leading to a Planning Proposal to amend Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 to allow detached dual occupancies in the RU2 Rural Landscape Zone with development consent) can only be achieved through the contribution of $35,000 in 2017/18. Engagement of consultants and commencement of Phase 2 of the RLS would need to be postponed until October 2017 to accommodate this additional body of work if budget is not provided in 2017/18.

Consultation:

Rural Lands Strategy Phase 1

A comprehensive community engagement framework formed an important component of Phase 1 of the RLS Component of the LGMS. It has been used as a key tool to better understand rural land use related issues from the perspective of the community, landowners and key stakeholders.

The community engagement process commenced with six workshops being held in three locations (Coramba, Woolgoolga and Bonville) in the Coffs Harbour LGA. The workshops were facilitated by consultants Edge Land Planning. The first workshop (held from 1-3 March 2016) identified key issues relevant to the particular rural area whereas the second workshop (held in the same locations from 15-17 March 2016) identified possible options to these key issues. The second round of workshops involved the refining of the issues raised from workshop one into a number of actions for the future by first identifying the constraints to resolving the issue and then working out the action needed.

The outcome of the community workshops formed the basis of the draft Issues and Options Paper, which along with the draft Background Report and Community Workshop Outcomes were placed on public exhibition from Wednesday, 20 July, 2016 until Friday, 19 August, 2016. Following the exhibition period, thirty one (31) written submissions were received. These submissions were reported to Council on 24 November 2016.

Rural Lands Strategy Phase 2

The draft Issues and Options Paper has been refined as a result of these submissions and is now presented to Council as the Coffs Harbour Rural Lands Issues and Options Paper 2017, for noting by Council (Attachment 1). 

Council has been facilitating the MyCoffs project to build Council’s Community Strategic Plan (CSP). It is a facilitated discussion with the community about what’s important to those who reside in the Coffs Harbour LGA and what the residents want the area to look like in the future. The expected timeframe for completion of the MyCoffs project is the end of June 2017. Any feedback received as part of the MyCoffs project relevant to rural lands will also be incorporated into phase 2 of the CHRLS.

The Agricultural Advisory Committee (AAC) has been formed to oversee the preparation of Phase 2 of the RLS. The composition of the AAC was ratified by Council at its meeting of 24 November 2016. The endorsement of the community representatives that have been selected on the AAC forms part of the recommendation to this report. The purpose of the Committee is to provide a forum for the discussion of technical, social, economic, environmental and cultural issues with a number of stakeholders with possibly differing viewpoints on rural land use related topics. This Committee will form a key consultation process of Phase 2, as well as the detached dual occupancy in RU2 Rural Landscape Zone body of work.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The objectives and desired outcomes of the Rural Lands Strategy will be to ensure compliance and consistency with the North Coast Regional Plan 2016 and Council’s CSP.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Phase 1 of the RLS is now complete. Phase 2 will commence in 2017 pending the outcome of this report and it is anticipated that it will take twelve (12) months to complete.

Subject to the adoption of the proposed recommendations in the 2017/18 final budget and delivery program, it would take three (3) months from the 1st July 2017 to prepare the dual occupancies Planning Proposal for presentation to Council for endorsement for a Gateway Determination.

Conclusion:

This report recommends the engagement of three (3) community members and nomination of two Councillors to the Section 355 Agricultural Advisory Committee. It also provides Council with a Local Growth Management Strategy Rural Lands Issues and Options Paper 2017 (Attachment 1), which outlines the issue of intensive agriculture in the LGA.

This report also provides an update on how best to deliver the Rural Lands Component of the Local Growth Management Strategy while expediting a review of the permissibility for detached dual occupancies in the RU2 Rural Landscape Zone; within the confines of business as usual.  It recommends that $35,000 is allocated in the 2017/18 final budget and delivery program to engage a consultant to undertake a Planning Proposal for dual occupancies for Gateway Determination.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

SC17/20       Planning Proposal to Rezone Land on Lots 371 & 372 DP 1026829 97 Pacific Street, Corindi Beach

Author:                        Planner / Urban Designer

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Communities

Coffs Harbour 2030:   PL1 Our infrastructure and urban development is designed for sustainable living

Attachments:              ATT1  SC17/20   Planning Proposal 97 Pacific Street, Corindi Beach - V1 Gateway Determination   

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to present a proponent-led Planning Proposal (PP) to Council that seeks to rezone rural land under Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 2013 to enable low density residential development, tourist residential development (a motel) and an expanded business development at 97 Pacific Street Corindi Beach (Lots 371 & 372, DP 1026829).  These land uses are currently prohibited in the RU2 Rural Landscape zone under Coffs Harbour LEP 2013.

97 Pacific Street is one of the last remaining large greenfield sites in the coastal village of Corindi Beach. It is included in the growth area footprint of Council’s Local Growth Management Strategy Urban Lands Component 2008 and the North Coast Regional Plan 2017. It is recommended that Council proceeds with a PP that rezones the site from a RU2 Rural Landscape zone and B1 Neighbourhood Centre zone to a part R1 General Residential zone, part R2 Low Density Residential zone and part B1 Neighbourhood Centre zone.

This involves seeking a Gateway Determination from NSW Planning and Environment (NSW P&E) to allow Council to place the PP (Attachment 1) on public exhibition.  It is also recommended that Council considers the outcome of the exhibition in a future Council report. 

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Endorse and forward a Planning Proposal (Attachment 1) to rezone land on Lots 371 & 372 DP 1026829 97 Pacific Street Corindi Beach, to NSW Planning and Environment seeking a “Gateway Determination”.

2.       Request that the Secretary of NSW Planning and Environment issue a written authorisation to Council to exercise delegation of the plan making functions under section 59 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act in respect of the Planning Proposal.

3.       Resolve to publicly exhibit the Planning Proposal and undertake government agency consultation based on the Gateway Determination issued by NSW Planning and Environment.

4.       Note that a further report will be brought back to Council for consideration following the public exhibition of the Planning Proposal.

 

Report

Description of Item:

This PP (Attachment 1) has been commissioned in response to a landowner’s request and at the landowner’s expense.  The PP seeks to rezone the subject lands to enable a low density residential subdivision and a motel development together with an extension to an existing neighbourhood shopping area.

·        The Subject Land:

The PP affects land located at 97 Pacific Street Corindi Beach (Lots 371 & 372, DP 1026829).  The land is 4.9ha in size and its location is shown in Figure 1. 

Figure 1 – Location of Subject Site

The site is located on the north-eastern interface of Corindi Beach. The land is flat with a concrete drainage channel transecting the privately owned portion of the site (Lot 372 DP 1026829) from the south-west corner to the north-east corner of the site.  The site is currently occupied by retail shops in its southern corner and the remainder of the land is vacant.  The Corindi Beach Racecourse Reserve is located to the north of the site, while Pipeclay Lake estuary is located to the north-east.  The Corindi Beach North Coast Holiday Park is located to the east of the site, and low density housing adjoins its southern and western boundaries.

An adjacent sewer pump station (Lot 371 DP 1026829), owned by Council, is also included within the overall PP.  The pump station is 192 m² in area and contains pump station infrastructure.  A change in zone on the pump station land from an RU2 Rural Landscape zone to an R2 Low Density Residential zone has been included in the PP in order to marry up with the surrounding and proposed zones.  The overall site currently sits within the RU2 Rural Landscape zone, with part of the land also included in the B1 Neighbourhood Centre Zone, corresponding with a small retail development on the site.

The site is included within the Local Growth Management Strategy (Urban Lands Component 2008) as an “investigation area for residential purposes” and within the North Coast Regional Strategy 2017’s Urban Growth Area (Investigation Area – Urban Land).  Accordingly, the planning proposal seeks to rezone the land to part Zone R1 General Residential, part Zone R2 Low Density Residential and part Zone B1 Neighbourhood Centre. The area to be rezoned expands that part of the site currently included in Zone B1 Neighbourhood Centre. Existing zones on the land are shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2 – Existing zones under LEP 2013

·        Zoning History of the Site

In May 2005 the Minister for Local Government announced the finalisation of the boundary matters relating to the amalgamation of the localities of Red Rock, Corindi Beach and approximately half of the Corindi plateau with the Coffs Harbour City LGA.  Prior to the amalgamation, these lands were governed by the dated provisions of the Ulmarra LEP 1992.  Coffs Harbour City Council and the (then) NSW Department of Planning formally rezoned the amalgamated lands on 31 July 2009 to align with the provisions of Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2000.

A “site specific” rezoning of 97 Pacific Street was first considered in 2003 by the then Ulmarra Shire Council however the rezoning process was never finalised.  The land is now part of the Coffs Harbour City Council LGA and was transferred to the Rural 1A Agriculture zone in 2009 as referenced above.   The RU2 Rural Landscape zone was subsequently applied under the Standard Instrument LEP amendment that has become the Coffs Harbour LEP 2013.

An approval to construct shops in the south-western corner of the site was also issued by Ulmarra Shire Council and the shops were subsequently constructed and occupied.  Coffs Harbour City Council rezoned an area including the curtilage of the shops to a B1 Neighbourhood Centre zone as part of a ‘housekeeping’ LEP review in 2015.  This PP looks to expand the existing B1 zone on the site.

A concept plan for a potential low density residential lot layout, motel site and expanded business development footprint, as well as a proposed zone arrangement for the site is shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3 – Development concept plan / applicant’s proposed zone arrangement

The PP report contained in Attachment 1 includes a detailed discussion of the PP’s intended outcomes, as well as an explanation of provisions and justification of the proposed rezoning.

Issues:

·        Increase to B1 Neighbourhood Centre Zone

The B1 Neighbourhood Centre zone covers small-scale neighbourhood centres that serve the needs of their surrounding areas, and may include retail uses, business premises, residential and community uses.  The B1 zone has been applied to small outlying centres such as Corindi Beach, Coramba, Emerald Beach, Nana Glen and Boambee East.  Given that they serve relatively small scale areas, care must be taken to ensure that the right amount of B1 zoned land is applied in each area, and that they do not detract from other major business centres. 

Council’s adopted Local Growth Management Strategy – Business Lands Component (BLC) 2010 addressed business zones within the LGA. It states: “the small outlying centres have an important role to play as neighbourhood centres to serve the needs of the residents in the immediately surrounding area. These areas should not accommodate any users that draw trade from a broad catchment nor should they host any significant employers that would position the centre as an employment destination. B1 ‘Neighbourhood Centre’ zoning is appropriate for these areas” (pg 64).

The PP includes a 4750 m² increase to the existing 1350 m² B1 Neighbourhood Centre zone that applies to the site, resulting in a total of 6100 m² of B1 zoned land in this location.  Corindi Beach is also served by a further 2500 m² of vacant B1 zoned land located in Tasman Street which results in an overall total of 8600 m² of B1 zoned land.  Given the floor space ratio requirement of 0.5:1 for B1 zoned land, should the PP proceed, Corindi Beach would potentially have 4300 m² of retail floorspace available to the local community.

The local community is currently served by a general store (approximately 135 m²) and a post office (approximately 100 m²), both of which are located within 150 metres of the subject site.

The BLC states, for Corindi Beach: “given the amount of land area zoned (at Tasman Street) and size of the surrounding population, the supply and demand analysis assumes that if developed, the site would possess a similar floorspace composition to Coramba, however as there is no existing activity this would need to be confirmed through local study (pg 73).”  The BLC acknowledges that Coramba has a main-street retail floor area of 5656 m².

The proponent submitted a Net Community Benefit (NCB) assessment with their PP supporting information. The submitted NCB generally addressed the potential benefit of additional business land in this location to the local community, however it did not address the issue of local supply and demand and an appropriate floorspace response in this location (given population projections and housing construction rates etc). This is a requirement of NSW P&E.   As indicated in the BLC, this specific issue will require clarification through local study, and this will be recommended to be included as part of the Gateway Determination issued by the NSW P&E.

·        Motel Development at this Location

The use of the subject land at 97 Pacific Street Corindi Beach for “motel and tourist accommodation” has been the subject of previous discussions between the landowner and Pristine Waters Council (2001) and Coffs Harbour City Council (2007).  Prior to the lodgement of this PP, no formal process was ever initiated to investigate this land use on this site.  From a locational perspective, the land is seen as a suitable location for a motel development for the following reasons:

-      suitable road network access, being located on a collector road;

-      availability of utility services;

-      large parcel of land;

-      the land is generally free of environmental hazards and constraints;

-      proximity to existing business lands (shops, bakery / café and post office);

-      proximity to the Corindi Beach North Coast Holiday Park; and

-      proximity to the coastline and beach.

·        Environmental Issues at the Site

Environmental sustainability issues are summarised in the PP (Attachment 1).  The Ecological Assessment submitted with the supporting information to the PP provides enough surety in relation to impacts to threatened species in order for the proposal to proceed to a Gateway Determination. Council staff have undertaken a preliminary assessment of these issues and further detailed assessment will need to be undertaken following the Gateway stage, including:

-      a detailed impact assessment based on the final concept design including the extent of affected vegetation (both on and offsite), impacts to the adjoining estuary and marine vegetation; and

-      additional flora and fauna surveys undertaken to account for seasonal and weather variations, which should include targeting amphibians and species that have been determined to possibly occur on the site.

Detailed site and development proposal specific environmental issues can also be addressed as part of a future development application should this PP be supported.  These measures could include retaining on-site vegetation, buffers to off-site vegetation, incorporating a Vegetation Management Plan, effective sediment and erosion controls during construction, excluding cats and/or dogs, local native landscaping, and impacts of pedestrian links.

Water quality and impacts to the adjacent Pipeclay Estuary system and the Solitary Islands Marine Park, will be one of the biggest issues for any type of urban development on this land.  Consideration was given to incorporating an environmental (E2 Environmental Conservation) zoning at the north-eastern extent of the site where the land naturally drains toward the estuary to address water quality issues.  However it is considered that a residential (R2) zone offers more flexibility in terms of amending the conceptual layout at the development stage to achieve compliance with Council’s Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) policy.  In this regard, one of the aims of WSUD is to blend urban infrastructure with a site's natural features in a way that reduces negative impacts on the natural water cycle and protect the health of aquatic ecosystems.

The Trunk Drainage / Flooding report submitted with the PP states that the proposed development would result in a 2% increase in peak runoff, however the report justifies this on the basis of an existing upstream detention basin over-compensating for the whole catchment.  The report acknowledges that there will be an increase in stormwater pollutants from the site but not ‘outside’ the scope of being able to be addressed by Council’s WSUD requirements.  Council staff support this view.

Mitigation actions at the development stage will focus on a development / lot layout that achieves little or no negative downstream impacts on the Solitary Islands Marine Park.  While Council staff are generally supportive of the concept of the current drainage channel being piped underground to a stormwater treatment method in proposed (conceptual) lot 1, Council needs to be assured that appropriate stormwater controls can be achieved on the site with regard to the area needed and the treatment proposed.  As mentioned above, an R2 zone would provide more flexibility in terms of amending the conceptual layout at the development stage to provide an acceptable outcome in terms of WSUD Policy compliance.

Options:

Council has a number of options in relation to this PP, including:

1.   Resolve to adopt the recommendation to support the PP and forward it to NSW Department of Planning and Environment seeking a ‘Gateway Determination’, to allow it to be placed on public exhibition and for consultation with relevant Government agencies.

Comment: This option provides a path for the desired rezoning of the site which will enable the proponent to obtain development consent for a low density residential subdivision, a motel development and an extension to an existing neighbourhood shopping area.

2.   Resolve to proceed with the PP with amendments or alternatives to the contents of this report.

Comment: These options, and their implications, have not been considered in this report.

3.   Resolve not to proceed with the PP.

Comment: This option will result in the lands remaining in their current zone arrangement, thereby not allowing the referenced development concept to proceed.

This report recommends that Council pursue Option 1 as outlined.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Environmental sustainability issues are summarised in the PP (Attachment 1).  The supporting information to the PP provides enough surety in relation to impacts to threatened species in order for the proposal to proceed to a Gateway Determination.

•     Social

Social sustainability issues referenced in the supporting information to the PP indicate that an expanded business zone will result in the creation of local jobs, both during construction and post construction.  The neighbourhood business area is also noted as being an asset to the local Corindi Beach community, with a medical centre proposed to be sited within this additional business area.

Aboriginal Cultural Heritage considerations are addressed in the PP.

•     Civic Leadership

The PP process will be undertaken in accordance with the provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment (EP&A) Act 1979, as well as the EP&A Regulation 2000.

The PP also seeks to implement appropriate and relevant objectives and associated strategies of the Coffs Harbour 2030 (Community Strategic) Plan.  Considering and implementing these community endorsed objectives and strategies as part of this PP ensures that the PP is consistent with the 2030 plan.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

In terms of capital investment, an expansion of the business on the site has the potential to generate additional income to the local economy.  The construction phase will employ local tradespeople, and the post construction phase will provide jobs that will further assist the local economy generally.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Given that this request for an amendment to Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 is a proponent led project, Council’s adopted fees and charges apply. In this regard there are no implications for Council’s Delivery Program or Operational Plan as this process is funded by the applicant.

Risk Analysis:

The PP has assessed and documented the constraints that affect the land, sufficient to allow Council to support the application to proceed to the Gateway application stage.  The PP has demonstrated that the constraints affecting the land can be managed effectively, therefore minimising associated risks.  Further rigorous risk analysis will be undertaken during the ongoing progression of the PP, and any subsequently lodged development application.

Consultation:

Should Council resolve to progress the PP and NSW P&E endorse public exhibition of it, all documents will be exhibited in accordance with the Gateway Determination and relevant provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (‘EP&A Act’). Consultation will also be undertaken with all relevant Government agencies in accordance with the Gateway Determination.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

The following policies and statutory documents have been considered in the preparation of this PP:

·      Coffs Harbour Local Environmental Plan 2013 and Development Control Plan 2015;

·      Coffs Harbour Local Growth Management Strategy component documents;

·      North Coast Regional Plan 2017 and Growth Area Maps;

·      State Environmental Planning Policies (SEPPs);

·      Section 117 Ministerial Directions;

·      Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Regulations; and

·      Coffs Harbour 2030 Plan.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Should Council resolve to progress this PP, it will be immediately forwarded to NSW P&E, requesting a Gateway Determination.  The timeframe for the completion of this PP is governed by the EP&A Act 1979 and will be determined by the NSW Department of Planning and Environment.

The projected timeline is as follows:

 

May 2017                                         PP referred to NSW Planning and Environment requesting a Gateway Determination.

June - August 2017                                   Gateway Determination issued and finalisation of additional information as requested by Council and NSW Planning and Environment.

September – October 2017                      Public exhibition/agency consultation period.

October - November 2017                        Review submissions and report to Council for determination of the planning proposal.

January - February 2018                          Council to exercise its delegation of plan making functions (if issued) under section 59 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 – that is, making the Plan.

Conclusion:

This report outlines a PP (Attachment 1) which seeks to change the zoning of 97 Pacific Street Corindi Beach from Zone RU2 Rural Landscape and B1 Neighbourhood Centre to part Zone R1 General Residential, part Zone R2 Low Density Residential and part Zone B1 Neighbourhood Centre.  The rezoning will enable a potential residential subdivision and motel development together with an extension to an existing neighbourhood shopping area and the establishment of a motel development on the site.

There is sufficient information to enable Council to support the PP and forward it to NSW P&E for its consideration and Gateway Determination.  Following receipt of the Gateway Determination and the satisfactory resolution of any requirements included with the Gateway Determination, the PP will be publicly exhibited to gauge public opinion on the PP, and the results of the public exhibition will be reported back to Council. 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

SI17/08         Traffic Committee Process

Author:                        Acting Section Leader Project Planning & Design

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

Coffs Harbour 2030:   MA2 We have a system of well-maintained and safe roads for all users

Attachments:              Nil

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

It is proposed that Council delegate approval of minor Local Traffic Committee (LTC) recommendations to the General Manager to increase efficiency and timely response to requests for regulatory signs and lines. Major items will continue to be submitted to Council for their approval.  LTC may also nominate minor items for Councillor approval at their discretion. The LTC report will list major items for Council approval and minor items for Council for noting.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Delegate authority to the General Manager to approve Minor Recommendations from the Local Traffic Committee.

2.       Note that all Major Recommendations, and any Nominated Minor Recommendations, from the Local traffic Committee will continue to be reported to Council for resolution.

3.       Note that all Minor Recommendations approved under the delegation will be reported to Council for note.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Council is given delegated authority to implement certain traffic control facilities/ prescribed traffic control devices on local road and road related areas by the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS). Under the Roads Act 1993 Council is required to seek the advice of the NSW Police and the RMS before exercising these functions. This is done via the Local Traffic Committee (LTC). The LTC is a technical review committee that makes recommendations to Council for Council’s final approval. There are four formal members of the LTC:

·    One representative of Council

·    One representative of the NSW Police

·    One representative of the RMS

·    The local State Member of Parliament (MP) or their nominee.

The Committee also includes additional informal (non-voting) members to provide expert subject matter advice. The LTC Meeting minutes, including all LTC recommendations, are presented to Council for Council’s approval every two months following the LTC’s bi-monthly meeting.

This process is very lengthy and often even minor matters such as a change in parking sign time limits can take up to four months to transit the LTC recommendation/Council approval process.

Many of the items which require LTC recommendations are routine and include for example minor modifications to signs and lines and traffic management plans for small events. It is possible to reduce the processing time for these issue types by delegating the approval process to the General Manager.

 

Section 50 of the Transport Administration Act 1988 permits RMS to delegate its functions to other public agencies such as Councils.

Many of the LTC recommendations are for minor regulatory items such as the modification of a ‘no stopping’ zone, or signs and lines for a new bridge. There are also approvals for small events such as traffic management plans for a local fun run. Some traffic management plans are for annual events that do not change, such as local area Anzac Day Parades. These would be classified as minor items.

This report is proposing that Council delegate approval of minor LTC recommendations to the General Manager in order to expedite the approval process for Minor Recommendations from the LTC.

Major items will continue to be submitted to Council for their approval. These would include approval for road closures and traffic management plans for large events. For example, a triathlon, or the Gold Cup Race Day. Also, decisions which have significant impact on the community, such as a parking plan for the multi-storey car park.

LTC members and the General Manager will both, and seperately, maintain the right to nominate and escalate any otherwise minor item for Council approval.

Issues:

Recommendations of the LTC relate to the authorisation of traffic control facilities and prescribed traffic control devices with the aim to improve road safety and traffic management on local roads.

Minor items are, by their nature low risk and are subject to the agreement of formal voting members of the LTC. Providing delegated authority to the General Manager provides an additional level of surety on Council’s behalf.

The Elected Member attending LTC would also have the discretion to nominate an item for approval by the Council.

Options:

1.   Do nothing: LTC will continue to report to Council as is the current practice.This would retain the existing implementation time delays.

2.   Adopt the recommendations: major items to be approved by Council and minor items to be noted. The implementation time for Minor items would be significantly reduced.

3.   Council could delegate authority to approve all LTC recommendations to the General Manager. Council’s role would be to note the decisions. The implementation time for all items, both Major and Minor, would be reduced.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Not applicable.

•     Social

LTC recommendations serve to maintain a high standard of road safety and traffic flow in the Local Government Area, including traffic management for events. The delegation of minor items for approval by a Council employee will expedite the process required to approve changes in traffic control facilities and prescribed traffic control devices, and reduce red tape.

•     Civic Leadership

Objective -  MA2 We have a system of well-maintained and safe roads for all users

                    MA 2.2  - Facilitate safe traffic, bicycle and pedestrian movement

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Not applicable.

•     Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

Council has an existing budget for works associated with traffic improvements. There will be savings in staff time by fast-tracking certain items for approval.

Risk Analysis:

A risk assessment has identified that delegation of minor Traffic Committee items would be low risk for the following reasons:

·    Major or contentious items would continue to be referred to Council.

·    The technical make up of the Local Traffic Committee ensures an informed decision-making process.

·    Sub-delegation would rest with the General Manager who provides surety that recommendations are low risk. The General Manager, or delegate, will also have the option to refer an item to Council if required.

Consultation:

The LTC are introducing measures to cut red tape and ensure the approval process is efficient. The members agree that sub-delegation for approval of minor items will achieve this goal with very low risk.

LTC members’ attendance is listed on the Minutes of each meeting.  Most of the matters raised are requests from the community.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

·           Traffic control facilities and prescribed traffic control devices may be authorised for use on a road or road related area, whether a public road or on private land, only by the RMS or Council.

·           Section 50 of the Transport Administration Act 1988 permits RMS to delegate its functions to other public agencies such as Councils.

·           Section 53A Part 6 permits RMS to give directions to Councils in relation to RMS functions.

·           The Road Transport (Safety and Traffic Management) Act 1999, incorporating the Road Rules 2008 provides for a system of traffic laws relating to all vehicles and pedestrians.

Implementation Date / Priority:

Delegation will be implemented from the date of the next LTC, being 13 June 2017.

Conclusion:

Council to delegate authority for the approval of minor items arising from the recommendations of LTC to the General Manager.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

SI17/09         Acquisition of Easement to Drain Water - 4 Beach Street and 5 Hastings Street, Woolgoolga

Author:                        Team Leader Property Development

Authoriser:                  Director Sustainable Infrastructure

Coffs Harbour 2030:   PL1 Our infrastructure and urban development is designed for sustainable living

Attachments:              ATT1  SI17/09     Plan of Proposed Easements and Piping Works  

 

Executive Summary

An agreement has been reached with two property owners at Woolgoolga in which Council will pipe an open drainage channel in exchange for being granted a formal easement for drainage of water over the completed works. Currently an unacceptable situation exists with an open drainage channel flowing diagonally across properties located at No 4 Beach Street and No 5 Hastings Street, Woolgoolga. The open drain receives channelled and concentrated water from Council’s existing road system. However as an open drain it provides a poor outcome in terms of community safety and ongoing erosion issues that may with time adversely affect Council infrastructure. Council officers have agreed to complete the works in a more suitable location on the properties on the basis the works and easement creation costs are paid for by Council and both owners agree to the proposal.

 

Recommendation:

That Council:

1.       Acquire an easement 3 metres wide for Drainage of Water over 4 Beach Street and 5 Hastings Street, Woolgoolga as shown in the location on the plan attached to this report.

2.       Pay all costs associated with creating the easements.

3.       As compensation for the grant of the easements construct a new piped drainage system on each of the properties affected as shown on the plan attached to this report.

4.       Execute all documents necessary to facilitate the matter under the common seal of Council.

 

Report

Description of Item:

Council officers have recently reached an agreement with the owners of 4 Beach Street and 5 Hastings Street, Woolgoolga to improve the existing drainage system that affects them. Both properties have an existing open drainage channel that diagonally bisects them taking concentrated water from the existing road network. The existing open drains do not have easements in Councils favour. The current situation is a safety hazard and may in time create erosion problems for nearby Council infrastructure.

Council have agreed to relocate the drainage over both properties in a piped system that will run parallel to the eastern boundary of each property as shown on the plan attached to this report. This plan also shows the location of the existing open drains.

The properties affected are owned by Inkcot Pty Ltd in respect of 4 Beach Street and The Roman Catholic Church in respect of No 5 Hastings Street. Both properties comprise vacant land and are zoned R3 Medium Density Residential under Coffs Harbour LEP 2013 and are suitable for further Development. The relocation and piping of the drainage system will improve the potential of the properties.

The piping of the drainage line will cost Council in the order of $120,000 based on preliminary estimates and will be allocated from Councils drainage programme for the 2017/18 financial year. Council will pay all costs of creating the easement over the properties on the basis that both owners agree to the proposal. It is envisaged that once formal Council approval is obtained the parties will enter into a legal deed that will be conditional on the agreement of both parties.

Issues:

Without obtaining a formal easement over the land affected the proposed works cannot proceed. Without the easement council rights to the drainage of water from its road system would be compromised and a degree of control lost.

Council has a responsibility to deal with concentrated water from its road system in urban areas.

Options:

Council has two primary options available:

 

1.   Council enters into a legal agreement to acquire the easements and complete the piping works as proposed.

2.   Council does not proceed to acquire the easement and does not complete the proposed piping works. If this occurred the existing situation would remain unchanged which may leave council in a compromised legal position. It would also leave in place a substandard drainage system which may be resolved by a future DA process but no specific timing could be relied upon to bring a resolution to the situation.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

The acquisition of the easement will in itself have little impact on the environment. All environmental issues will be considered as part of the planning and final design for the pipeline works. Currently the properties impacted have little vegetation apart from grassed areas.

•     Social

The acquisition of the easement and construction of the pipeline will improve the local road drainage network. Once completed, both on-going maintenance and safety issues will be improved for Council.

•     Civic Leadership

Councils 2030 Community Strategic Plan promotes continued investment and improvement to infrastructure and the road network. The acquisition of the easements is integral to the piped drainage works.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

Council has an allocation within its current and future budgets for upgrading drainage works. The preliminary estimates suggest the works will cost in the order of $120,000. The costs associated with the easement creation and transfer will be in the order of $6,000.

•     Economic - Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

There will be minimal impact as a result of the acquisition.

Risk Analysis:

The risk in relation to this matter is assessed as minor and insignificant and the current latent risk which Council faces will be mitigated. Future legal risk will be insignificant as the deed will be prepared by Councils legal adviser.

Consultation:

Relevant internal stakeholders have been consulted.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Council has in the past acquired easements where required and appropriate. Council procedures require legal tenure or access over land upon which it constructs new infrastructure.

 

Section 377(1) (h) of the Local Government Act 1993 requires the formal approval of Council in regard to the acquisition of land or property interests.

Implementation Date / Priority:

The matter will be actioned immediately upon resolution.

Conclusion:

This report addresses the requirements for the acquisition of two easements over private land for the purposes of drainage to facilitate the upgrading and construction of a piped system at Woolgoolga.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

T17/08          TRUST REPORT - Update on Former Deep Sea Fishing Club Site

Author:                        Manager Holiday Parks and Reserves

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

Coffs Harbour 2030:   LP1 Coffs Harbour is a regional centre for future-driven, innovative and green business and industry

Attachments:              ATT1  T17/08      Former DSFC EOI Expanded Site

ATT2  T17/08      Minister Blair Correspondence

ATT3  T17/08      DoI Lands Correspondence  

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This report provides an update on the former Deep Sea Fishing Club Site following the liquidation of the Coffs Harbour Deep Sea Fishing Club Limited and disclaiming of the lease by the liquidator.

 

Consultation has been ongoing with the Department of Industry – Lands at ministerial level to ensure as much as possible that a consistent approach is taken to advancing possible future use of the site in both the short and long term.

 

This report summarises recent activities, current issues and explores a range of options for progressing future use and/or development of the site consistent with the current Jetty Foreshores Plan of Management and broader strategic considerations for the area by the whole of government Jetty Foreshores Precinct Project Control Group.

 

The report recommends that the Trust approve the development of an Expression of Interest (EOI) for short-term use (up to three years) and the drafting of an EOI for long-term use and/or development of the expanded site.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council as Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust:

1.   Note the activities undertaken on the site since the disclaiming of the previous lease;

2.   Approve the development of an Expression of Interest (EOI) for short-term use (up to three years) of the existing facility; and

3.   Approve the drafting of an EOI for long-term use and/or development of the expanded site that will be subject to a further report to the Trust.

 

Report

Description of Item:

The Coffs Harbour Deep Sea Fishing Club (DSFC) was placed into liquidation by Administrators, Grant Thornton Australia, on 3 July 2016 and the Liquidators formally disclaimed the lease for the site on 24 August 2016.

 

As part of the liquidation process, the Trust purchased all Plant, Property and Equipment (PPE) of the club to ensure all options for future use of the site were kept available.  The PPE was also purchased to remove ‘make good’ requirements under the lease that were unlikely to be fulfilled by the Liquidator (e.g. damages caused to the building by the removal of the PPE would not be rectified and would be a cost incurred by the Trust).  The PPE included the kitchen and bar facilities, cool rooms, and furniture and fittings.

 

The Trust has issued several Temporary Licence Agreements for use of portions of the site including the fish cleaning and BBQ facilities to the Coffs Harbour Game Fishing Club, understorey storage area to the Pacifica Outriggers Club and sections of the main building have been licenced to Rally Australia for use as a corporate and public spectator point for the Jetty Foreshores Super Special Stage.  The Coffs Harbour Game Fishing Club are licenced to utilise the facility over the Easter period for their annual fishing tournament.  Further temporary licence applications will be considered on a case by case basis.

 

The Trust has also undertaken management and maintenance works on the site to ensure the facility remains in an operational condition and all PPE has been tested and cleaned in preparation for future use.  Substantial funds have been invested to date to rectify maintenance issues such as a major water leak under the carpark, the progressive failure of the security and fire systems and the general degradation of the building and the lack of maintenance undertaken by the previous lessee.

 

The future use opportunities are yet to be fully explored and it is recommended that any future use of the site, either in the short or long term, must be provided through an open market process.  Long standing advice from Department of Industry – Lands (DoI Lands) with regards to the leasing of Crown Land is that:

 

“One key condition [is] that unless inappropriate to do so, in all circumstances, the lessee must be selected through a competitive tender process“

 

The Trust has previously resolved on 14 May 2015:

 

“3.     That in the event the Lease of Lot 22 in DP 850150 to the Deep Sea Fishing Club is terminated the Trust then undertake an EOI process to identify suitable prospective lessee for the future occupation and operation of the premises”

 

Undertaking an EOI process will enable the Trust to ascertain the full potential for the site and determine the location’s highest and best use.  The EOI would then inform a competitive tender process (either select or open) and would comply with the requirements of DoI Lands.  The EOI also allows the Trust to include deliverables and non-negotiable items as part of the process and may include the provision of opportunities for community groups and clubs to retain access to any redevelopment undertaken on the site (e.g. the new facility would be required to provide a ‘home base’ for a recreational fishing focussed club or would need to incorporate a cultural or heritage facilities for use by the community).  Many of the broader opportunities for the site are captured in the Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Plan of Management (PoM) adopted June 2008, but there is scope for the Trust to include specific outcomes required of the EOI process.

 

The PoM identifies the former DSFC site as part of Management Precinct 2: South Coffs Island and Corrambirra Point, and describes the desired future character “as a high quality maritime, recreational and tourist oriented precinct in a rehabilitated natural coastal setting” and more specifically:

 

“The site occupied by the Deep Sea Fishing Club, extended if necessary, could be developed to create a more sympathetic built form, particularly in consideration of this unique location.  The functional character of the site should be retained i.e. a focus on recreational fishing including local, regional and international sports fishing events”.

 

In addition, the PoM goes on to state “...management precinct facilities could include tourist and visitor accommodation, public entertainment, convention/function centre, restaurants and, cafes and could also include retail and commercial space, including offices, to support maritime and tourist activities if commercially feasible.”  The PoM also states that “an indigenous cultural centre and gallery could be part of the mix of facilities”.

 

The PoM then identifies appropriate Land Use/Activity for the management precinct and addresses Planning Guidelines and Urban Design Guidelines including Height, Environmentally Sensitive Urban Design, Built Character, Traffic and Parking and Pedestrian Movement. A full copy of the PoM can be found here.

 

The Options Section of this report considers the various courses of action available to the Trust and includes:

 

·    Undertake additional masterplanning for the site to determine most appropriate long term use prior to any offer to the market;

·    No action in the short term whilst undertaking a long term EOI and tender process (open or select tender);

·    Short-term casual hire of the existing facility, managed by the Trust, whilst undertaking a long-term EOI and Tender process (open or select tender);

·    Short-term EOI for a licence to operate a community or commercial operation on the site (up to three years) whilst undertaking a long term EOI and tender process (open or select tender); and

·    Short-term EOI for a licence to operate a community or commercial operation on the site (up to three years) only at this time.

Issues:

Length of Major EOI/Tender

Whilst no formal timeframes have been established as yet there are indications that an EOI/tender process for the redevelopment of the site could take up to three years before a suitable proponent is secured and works commence on the site.  The timeframes are driven by the complex nature of the process and the need to ensure strong consultation and governance procedures are maintained at all times.  The major EOI/tender would be subject to several calls to the market, initially via an open EOI, followed by a competitive tender process.  The tender process used is dependent upon the outcomes of the EOI with options available to undertake a select tender or put the tender out to the open market.  Once a successful proponent is secured there are likely to be ongoing direct negotiations prior to the execution of any lease or other agreements.

 

Major Stakeholder

The Minister for Lands is considered a major stakeholder in the process and the Department of Industry – Lands will be heavily consulted throughout the entire process.  The Minister has final approval for any agreement entered into by the Trust and it is essential that Lands officers are given the opportunity to have input into the process.

 

Last year a meeting was sought with the Minister for Primary Industries and Minister for Lands and Water, the Hon. Niall Blair MLC, with the purpose being to ensure that Council’s considerations are consistent with the Minister’s forward strategic considerations. On Monday 21 November 2016 the Mayor, General Manager and Director Business Services met with Minister Blair in his Sydney offices. Also in attendance at this meeting were the Local Member Andrew Fraser MP, Mr Dennis Buttigieg, Director Crown Property Services with DoI Lands and James Piggott, Policy Officer in the Minister’s Office. The meeting was productive in that the parties were able to share their respective thoughts on the matter at hand and also to agree that it was critically important that the Minister and the Trust are informed, aware and as much as possible like-minded on the future direction of this iconic site. Following the meeting, Minister Blair issued correspondence (Attachment 2) summarising the Government’s position on the matter particularly given some of the considerations around options for the broader Jetty Foreshore precinct. As can be seen from the correspondence, the Minister expressed a view that further information would be available after February 2017 following further engagement around options for the broader Jetty Foreshore precinct.

 

The NSW Government have initiated a Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Precinct Project Control Group (PCG) which brings together a range of government agencies that hold interest in the Jetty Foreshores location.  The PCG is taking a multi-agency, whole of Government approach to the broad strategic direction of the Port of Coffs Harbour and is a strong indication from Government that the Foreshores are a high priority location.  It is important that the Trust consult with the PCG to ensure that the approach taken is consistent with the wider strategic direction of the location.

 

Council Officers have been in contact with the Department regarding the future direction to be taken for the site and the Department’s response (Attachment 3) indicated that a tender for short term use would be supported but also stated that “in relation to the longer term use of the site the preference at this point is to await further development of the of the broader strategic master planning for the precinct.” The recommendation in the report aligns with the Department’s concurrence for a three year short term EOI, but also recommends the drafting of a broader EOI for long term use to at least commence this process.

 

Range of Opportunities for the Site

The site represents a unique opportunity for the market.  The site is subject to the Jetty Foreshores Plan of Management (PoM) which has undergone significant public consultation.  However, given the high profile location and significance of the site, it is likely that further community consultation may be required before any long term commitments are made for the site.  The PoM enables a wide span of activities for the site encompassing a variety of community and commercial uses.  Additionally, it is proposed to make the scope of the initial EOI broad allowing consideration of a diverse range of opportunities including, but not limited to, repurposing the existing building on a similar lease footprint to the former DSFC through to a redevelopment of the site on an expanded footprint.

 

Maintenance Costs

As previously mentioned there are ongoing costs for the site that are not being funded through the commercial use of the facility. Major repairs to the water service, security system, fire and evacuation system as well as vandalism and general degradation are all costs being borne by the Trust without a regular income stream being derived from the facility.

Options:

Option 1 – Additional Masterplanning

The development of an additional masterplan, which would be adopted by the Trust, would assess and establish the highest and best use for the site before any call to the market.  The outcome would be that the Trust would establish the parameters for the site and offer an EOI/Tender for predetermined outcomes.

 

Pros:      The Trust establishes the direction for the site and controls the consistency and compliance with other planning instruments including the PoM.

Cons:     There is already an adopted PoM for the reserve and a Trust driven masterplan for the former DSFC site may not provide any further benefit in terms of planning outcomes.  A masterplan also has the potential to limit the markets creativity for the site and exclude valid proponents who have the skills and capacity to deliver positive outcomes for the community.  The masterplan option will also extend project delivery timeframes as there will still be a requirement to undertake an EOI/tender process.


 

 

Option 2 – Long-Term EOI with no Short-Term Options

Undertake an EOI in line with the timeframes indicated within the Issues Section of this report.  Under this option the Trust would focus upon the long-term EOI and would not consider any short-term usage of the site.  The EOI would offer the market the opportunity to present community or commercial business cases for the re-use/redevelopment of the existing facilities, for a development of a ‘greenfield’ project on an expanded footprint per Attachment 1 (e.g. demolish and rebuild) or a combination of these two options.

 

Pros:      Enables focus upon the long term goals for the site without the added responsibilities relating to the management of short-term casual hire or short-term licences.

Cons:     Does not save any time with regards to the EOI process but results in a loss of potential revenue through short term casual hire or short term licences.

 

Option 3- Short-Term Casual Hire with Concurrent Long-Term EOI

Under this option the Trust would undertake a long term EOI per above and concurrently offer the site for commercial and community activities on a short term casual hire basis. The day-to-day management and operations of the facility would be undertaken by the Trust and possible uses could include individual hiring for weddings and functions, use by community groups and special interest groups and use as a conference/event space.

 

Pros:      The site would generate an income during the long-term EOI process and contribute towards the ongoing management and maintenance of the site.  This option would also allow for the continuation of the existing temporary licences issued by the Trust.  The site would be widely available to a broad cross section of community groups and users whilst the EOI process is undertaken.

Cons:     There would be considerable human resources consumed in the delivery of this model with the cost of administration, operations and maintenance falling to the Trust.

 

Option 4 - Short-Term EOI (up to 3 Years) with Concurrent Long-Term EOI

Undertake long-term EOI per above but also undertake a short-term EOI to secure a licensee for a period of up to three years.  The license would be developed so that the three year period can be terminated at any time should the long term EOI process yield results inside the estimated timeframes.  Potential uses could include a wedding/conference/events centre, base for a community group/club, a licensed venue or a combination of these opportunities.

 

Pros:      The site would generate income during the long-term EOI process and apart for the cost of the short-term EOI and some administrative costs, all expenses would be incurred by the successful proponent.  This option has the highest potential to ensure continuity of use during the long-tern EOI process and there remains scope for the existing temporary license holders to continue occupation of the site in the short term.

Cons:     Short term nature of the occupation (up to three years) may limit the number of interested parties.

 

Option 5 - Short-Term EOI (up to 3 Years) Only at This Time

Undertake a short-term EOI to secure a licencee for a period of up to three years.  Potential uses could include a wedding/conference/events centre, base for a community group/club, a licensed venue or a combination of these opportunities. The long-term future of the site would be further considered based on advice from DPI Lands, including the outcomes of broader considerations by the PCG.

 

Pros:      The site would generate income and apart for the cost of the short-term EOI and some administrative costs, all expenses would be incurred by the successful proponent.

Cons:     Short term nature of the occupation (up to three years) may limit the number of interested parties. Also, the long-term future of the site and potential opportunities from a long-term EOI are not advanced immediately.

 

Although Option 5 is the option supported by recent correspondence from DoI Lands, it is considered appropriate to at least undertake preliminary work for a long-term EOI.  Any concerns with this work compromising the broader considerations of the PCG can be mitigated by ensuring reference is made to the group and their deliberations on a regular basis and before any firm decisions are made in the EOI process. Therefore Option 4 is recommended to the Trust.

Sustainability Assessment:

•     Environment

Any process selected must comply with the principles of Crown Land management and be in line with the adopted reserve Plan of Management.  The PoM identifies a range of values that must be considered when formulating the management strategies of the reserve.  Central to this is the management of the natural environment and heritage values.

 

The Jetty Foreshores has iconic visual amenity that needs to be preserved and any development should consider protecting the holistic visual amenity of the site.  The Foreshores also contain areas of natural vegetation that need to be preserved and contains, and adjoins, areas of high ecological value (including Muttonbird Island and the Solitary Island Marine Park) and whilst the EOI site does not impact on the natural vegetation or ecological areas directly, the broader impact of any redevelopment needs to be considered.

 

The Foreshores also contains areas of significant Aboriginal and European heritage that must be considered and where appropriate enhanced.  The EOI site adjoins the Heritage Listed Ferguson’s Cottage and is in close proximity to the culturally significant sites of Corrambirra Point and South Coffs Island.  Any redevelopment of the EOI site must be done in consultation with the Aboriginal community and foster positive outcomes in line with the PoM.

•     Social

The Jetty Foreshores is a key focal point for the Coffs Harbour community.  The location facilitates a diverse range of community and social opportunities and is a prime recreational hub for the district.  Any proposals for the future use of the former DSFC site must be developed in a manner that enhances the social outcomes for the community.  The PoM identifies the EOI site as a location that should support tourist and visitor accommodation, public entertainment, convention/function centre, restaurants and, cafes and could also include retail and commercial space, including offices, to support maritime and tourist activities.  This in turn will assist in achieving the goal of identifying the Foreshores as an outstanding destination that enhances recreation opportunities and provides improved public facilities and access.

•     Civic Leadership

Coffs Harbour City Council is the Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust and is charged with the care, control and management of the Jetty Foreshores including the former DSFC site.  Undertaking an open competitive process for the use of public land is considered the most appropriate manner with which to ascertain the highest and best use for the site and this course of action is supported by the DoI Lands. The open EOI/tender process will exhibit strong corporate governance in line with DoI Lands and ICAC requirements.

•     Economic – Broader Economic Implications

The EOI/tender process is expected to be a strong economic driver for the Foreshores and the wider Coffs Harbour community.  Whilst the market has yet to be tested there are strong indications that there is keen interest for the site from a variety of potential proponents.  The Coffs Harbour Local Aboriginal Land Council has publicly stated their interest in developing a community and cultural centre on the site and during the DSFC administration process there was interest in developing the site as a licenced premise.

 

An appropriately selected proposal has the potential to act as an economic driver and deliver increased interest in the location and stimulate investor confidence.  Council, the Trust and DoI - Lands are all investing significant funds into the Foreshore precinct through the provision of improved infrastructure (e.g. breakwalls) and recreational opportunities (e.g. .J4S Project Stages 1-5) and the EOI has the potential to complement and enhance these investments.  Any use and/or redevelopment of the site will also provide improved employment opportunities for the region, both during construction, and in the longer term.

•     Economic – Delivery Program/Operational Plan Implications

The EOI process will be funded by the Coffs Coast State Park Trust through operating surpluses.  The long term implications on Council’s Delivery Program/Operational Plan will be further clarified during the EOI/tender process but it is envisaged that any commercial activity on the site will generate a significant income for the Trust.

Risk Analysis:

There are a range of risks that are associated with the recommendation. These risks include:

 

1.   Proceeding to a long-term EOI ahead of broader planning process being undertaken by the PCG. The risk is two-fold with the first being that going to the long-term EOI is contrary to advice given by DoI Lands and secondly, any outcomes secured may not be in keeping with the broader intent established by the PCG. This risk is being ameliorated by ensuring any EOI would be in keeping with the adopted Plan of Management for the reserve and the recommendation is that the long-term EOI only be brought to draft stage before further consideration by the Trust. This will provide the Trust the opportunity to make a start on the process whilst still enabling the PCG to undertake their proposed suite of works concurrently. There remains the opportunity to review the integration of the two processes at a later date.

2.   Investment into the two EOI processes will not guarantee a suitable outcome. This risk will be managed through the preparation of specific project management plans for each EOI which will establish specific project parameters, including further risk analysis and involve the identification of key stakeholders for consolation and collaboration.

3.   The long-term EOI will be the first of its type offered at the Jetty Foreshores. There is an inherent risk that this project would be the first of its type in the location with no local precedents or similar projects to refer to. It is proposed to undertake a broad review of similar projects through NSW to capture best practice outcomes and establish guidelines for this project.

Consultation:

Consultation to date has been undertaken relevant Council stakeholders and DoI Lands. As the EOI is developed it is proposed that an internal Project Team be established which includes Local Planning, Governance Services and Financial Services and Logistics (Property and Procurement).  It is also essential that ongoing consultation is undertaken with DoI Lands and the Coffs Harbour Jetty Foreshores Precinct Project Control Group.

Related Policy, Precedents and / or Statutory Requirements:

Coffs Harbour City Council is Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust and is charged with the care, control and management of the reserve with incorporates the proposed EOI site.

Implementation Date / Priority:

The approved process(es) will commence upon the resolution of the Trust.

Conclusion:

The former Coffs Harbour Deep Sea Fishing Club site is currently underutilised and is not generating sufficient revenue to meet the ongoing maintenance costs for the facility. The site has had several temporary licence agreements issued for various uses which have ameliorated the costs but there is a predicted opportunity to secure a short term lessee for a period of three years.

 

This option is supported by DoI Lands and the implementation period is considered to be relatively short. During the period of the short term lease, it is recommended to develop a longer term, expanded opportunity for the site and undertake a staged competitive process to secure suitable proponents. This option is not supported by DoI Lands who have advised that their preferred course of action is to await the outcomes of the broader planning process being undertaken by the Coff Harbour Jetty Foreshores Project Control Group.

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                                                       27 April 2017


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                               27 April 2017

PDF Creator


Ordinary Council Meeting Agenda                                                             27 April 2017

T17/09          TRUST REPORT - Relocation of Marine Rescue Woolgoolga to Arrawarra Headland Facility - Progress Report

Author:                        Manager Holiday Parks and Reserves

Authoriser:                  Director Business Services

Coffs Harbour 2030:   LC1 Coffs Harbour is a strong, safe and adaptable community

Attachments:              Nil

 

 

Executive Summary

In accordance with Council’s resolution 2017/3 at its meeting held on 9 February 2017, progress reports are provided to each Council meeting on the relocation of Marine Rescue Woolgoolga to Arrawarra Headland.

 

 

Recommendation:

That Council, as Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust, note the progress report.

 

Report

Council, as Corporate Manager of the Coffs Coast State Park Trust, is continuing to work with Marine Rescue Woolgoolga (MRW) and Woolgoolga Surf Life Saving Club (WSLSC) to secure suitable bases of operation for each organisation.  After significant investigation work a suitable location for MRW has been found at the Arrawarra Headland Research Station, which is also a Crown Reserve.

The proposed relocations are vitally important to the future operations of both MRW and the WSLSC.  The WSLSC advised the Trust in early 2017 that funding sources are at threat due to the WSLSC project not being ‘spade ready’ by 30 June 2017.

Progressing the proposed relocations has required significant negotiations to change existing tenures and ensure the future operational requirements of all parties are considered.  The land tenure changes required to enable the MRW relocation to occur are complete.  Following initial design work, obtaining quantity surveying estimates and further negotiations, up to $600,000 funding from the Coffs Coast Trust has now been committed to the MRW relocation project.

This report provides progress on the MRW relocation project as at 13 April 2017 (Council/Trust reports due date) and is detailed by milestone in the following table.  It should be noted that the completion of milestones is at certain stages dependent on other parties.  Council officers recognise the critical importance of completing the MRW relocation project as quickly as possible to facilitate WSLSC’s relocation.


 

 

Milestone

Status as at 13 April 2017

Legal access to the Arrawarra Headland facility

Recent discussions with NPWS officers have indicated that a letter of consent could be issued to facilitate access until such time as the Coffs Coast Regional Park Plan of Management is adopted. Once adopted, it is envisaged that the Plan of Management will make the granting of an easement for access permissible. Council is waiting on confirmation from NPWS officers regarding this course of action with advice expected by 26 April 2017.

 

Final design of the Arrawarra Headland facility

Sub consultants have been engaged by the architect to progress the designs to the tender/construction stage.

 

Development consent for the Arrawarra Headland facility

Development Application submission was delayed one week on the previously reported date due to additional information requested. Consultant was engaged to facilitate the delivery of specialist information. DA has now been submitted.

 

Stakeholder meeting has been held with the Aboriginal community and outcomes and course of action has been established.

 

Vegetation Management requirements have been confirmed with Marine Rescue and included in environmental reports.

 

Tender and contract for construction of the Arrawarra Headland facility

Tender/construction contract documents are being progressed with consultants engaged to develop specifications. Deadline for sub consultants’ work has passed and architect is waiting on Hydraulic and Electrical specifications to be finalised. Once received the construction documentation can be completed. Tenders will be called concurrently with the development application assessment process.

 

Surrender of Marine Rescue lease at Woolgoolga Beach Reserve

Marine Rescue NSW has previously confirmed their intent to relinquish their existing lease once construction contract documentation is executed. They have recently provided written confirmation of this contingent upon Council meeting their requirements for the new base of operations at Arrawarra.

 

The preparation of a lease lot and lease for the WSLSC has progressed and Council is waiting for the survey plan to be received ready for lodgement.

 

Native Title assessments have been completed.

 

Woolgoolga Beach Reserve (South) Plan of Management

DoI Lands have confirmed that the Plan of Management for Woolgoolga Beach Reserve (South) has been adopted by the Minister. This is a significant milestone for the project and will provide voracity and strength to any WSLSC grant application. The adoption of the Plan of Management makes the plan a statutory document and under Part 5, Division 6, S114(2) of the Crown Lands Act 1989, “If a Plan of Management is adopted: a) the Reserve Trust shall carry out and give effect to it.” With the relocation of the WSLSC listed as a key strategy within the Plan, there is now strong evidence that the future location of the SLSC is assured.

 

In addition to progressing the project milestones, stakeholder engagement activities are continuing, including:

 

·     Meeting has been held with the Woolgoolga Surf Life Saving Club Working Group to provide a project update and to address any concerns arising;

·     Meeting has been held with Kevin Hogan MP to provide an update on project progress and to assist in securing existing grant funding. Mr Hogan will be forwarding to Council information direct from the funding body regarding the requirements to satisfy the body and secure the funds.

·     Meeting has been held, at Woolgoolga Reserve, with DoI Lands Officers to discuss lease and associated matters. The meeting gave Council some strong direction regarding these issues and also provided DoI Lands Officers with an update on the project’s progress.